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TEN THINGS NEW TEACHERS NEED FOR SUCCESS IN

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Working with NOT Doing to . . . This presentation looks at the . other side . of the classroom management problem: How children themselves view their roles as ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: TEN THINGS NEW TEACHERS NEED FOR SUCCESS IN


1
TEN THINGS NEW TEACHERS NEED FOR SUCCESS IN
CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT
  • SUSAN F. BELGRAD
  • ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF EDUCATION
  • CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSIY, NORTHRIDGE
  • Susan.belgrad_at_csun.edu
  • http//www.csun.edu/sb4310

2
Working with NOT Doing to . . .
  • This presentation looks at the other side of the
    classroom management problem
  • How children themselves view their roles as
    subordinate members of a classroom.

3
Some questions we will address are
  • Why is so hard to keep students attentive?
  • Why do rewards only work for so long?
  • Why do punishments always have to get harsher?
  • What are the true perspectives behind the
    ever-popular Assertive Discipline Strategies?
  • How do I reach the unmotivated student in a class
    of 30?

4
Some ideas we will share are
  • Promoting a sense of community in your classroom
    through
  • Cooperative learning strategies
  • Promoting Habits of Mind
  • Energizers and silent cheers
  • Room arrangement
  • Classroom Meetings
  • Jigsaws and graphic organizers

5
Consider in your classroom Are you working
with or doing to your students. It makes a
BIG difference!
6
THINK-PAIR-SHARE
  • 1. Why is so hard to keep students attentive?
  • 2. Why do rewards only work for so long?
  • 3. Why do punishments always have to get
    harsher?
  • 4.
  • 5.

7
Why is so hard to keep students attentive?
  • Kohn et al believe that curriculum and
    instruction are the major reasons why students
    tune out. If they find the curriculum empty of
    meaning or above their ability to comprehend,
    they can do nothing but tune out.
  • Health educators believe that many students are
    brain starved having not eaten breakfasts (or
    lunch and dinners) rich in protein and important
    nutrients for the brain and body.

8
Why do rewards only work for so long?
Behavioral theory is clear that interest in the
reward becomes extinguished if they are not
considered important or sufficient enough to the
subject. Psych 101 course work about
intermittent reinforcement is often lost on the
use of rewards in the classroom. The only option
is to escalate the value of the reward to the
subjects (students). Students often become inured
to or resistant to the reward. (fearing
everything they attempt nothing)
9
Why do punishments always have to get harsher?
  • Is the message of a punishment that the adult is
    demanding compliance?
  • If we have to keep using it then it isnt
    especially effective
  • Punishment seldom solves the problemit generally
    makes it worse. Thus, harsher punishment
  • THE PUNISHMENT WILL CONTINUE UNTIL MORALE
    IMPROVES!!

10
SOME THINGS TO CONSIDER ABOUT YOUR CLASSROOM
CLIMATE
  • Do you seek strategies to control or stop bad
    behaviors or to help children to become good
    people?
  • What do you believe children need from us to be
    successful participants in the classroom?

11
  • If the teacher isnt in control of the
    classroom, the most likely result is chaos.
  • Children need to be told exactly what the
    adult expects of them as well as what will happen
    if they dont do what theyre told.
  • You need to give positive reinforcement to a
    child who does something nice if you want him to
    keep acting that way.

12
  • Working independently is a euphemism for
    higher rates of disruption and time off task.
  • Children are not innately motivated to behave
    in school.
  • Offering a reward for compliance constitutes
    a bribe.
  • Without the powerful reinforcement of
    recognition students will likely revert to less
    cooperative ways.

13
FIVE THINGS EFFECTIVE TEACHERS DO TO PROMOTE
POSITIVE LEARNING CLIMATES
STRIVE TO CREATE A POSITIVE LEARNING CLIMATE
AMONG ALL STUDENTS
LEAD ENGAGED LEARNING CLASSROOMS
LEARN ABOUT AND INTEGRATE COOPERATIVE LEARNING
STRATEGIES
EXPLICITLY TEACH AND ASSESS SOCIAL SKILLS AND
INTELLIGENT BEHAVIORS
PROVIDE TIME AND OPPORTUNITY FOR STUDENTS TO TAKE
RESPONSIBILITY FOR THEIR CLASSROOM COMMUNITY
14
I A L A C
  • Use this strategy to begin the conversation about
    why the way we treat one another makes a BIG
    difference.

15
THE SOCIAL CONTEXT OF THE CLASSROOM
1
  • The effective teacher works within a
    learning community with both peers and students.
    The necessity for engagement of all learning
    community members in shared activity that values
    the processes of dialogue and inquiry is
    recognized and respected.

16
Why Effective Teachers Promote Community in
Their Classrooms
  • Consider the brighter side of human nature. . .
  • The evidence increasingly points to an
    innate disposition in children to be responsive
    to the plight of other people. Creating people
    who are socially responsive does not totally
    depend on parents and teachers. Such socializing
    agents have an ally within the child.

  • Martin Hoffman

17
EFFECTIVE TEACHERS LEAD ENGAGED LEARNING
CLASSROOMS
Engaged Learning Indicators Definition
1. Tasks 1. Challenging and authentic.
2. Assessment 2. Performance-based and an ongoing part of instruction.
3. Learning Outcomes 3. The learner is responsible for his/her own learning. Also, the learner collaborates with others.
4. Grouping is heterogeneous 4. Different ability levels and backgrounds.
5. Teacher Roles 5. Facilitator, guide and co-learner. The teacher is an explorer and helps students construct their own opinions.
6. Student Roles 6. Producer and teacher. They are encouraged to teach others and explore new ideas.
18
Turn Your Classroom into a Place Where
Students Recognize We Can Learn . . .
  • 95 of what we teach to someone.
  • 80 of what we experience personally.
  • 70 of what is discussed with others.
  • 50 of what we both see and hear.
  • 30 of what we see.
  • 20 of what we hear.
  • 10 of what we read.



  • William Glasser

19
  • To help students become ethical people, as
    opposed to people who merely do what they are
    told, we cannot merely tell them what to do. We
    have to help them figure out--for themselves and
    with each other--how one ought to act. That's why
    dropping the tools of traditional discipline,
    like rewards and consequences, is only the
    beginning. It's even more crucial that we
    overcome a preoccupation with getting compliance
    and instead involve students in devising and
    justifying ethical principles.

  • Alfie Kohn

20
(No Transcript)
21
Dimensions of Teaching, Learning and
Professional Authority 3 ADAPTIVE
DECISION-MAKING
MODES OF LEARNING INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES PROFESSIONAL AUTHORITY
STUDENT passive IMITATION EXPLORATION PREDICTION TESTING CONSTRUCTION Active TEACHER Active DIRECTING (DIDACTIC) INQUIRING BRIDGING FACILITATING Interactive LEADER Dominant AUTOCRATIC CONSULTATIVE PARTICIPATIVE DEMOCRATIC Interactive and facilitative
S.F. Belgrad, 1991
22
CHARACTERISTICS OF INTELLIGENT BEHAVIOR (Habits
of Mind)
  •                Persistence
  •  
  •               Decreasing impulsivity
  •  
  •               Empathic listening
  •  
  •               Flexibility in thinking
  •  
  •               Metacognitive awareness
  •  
  •               Checking for accuracy
  •  
  •               Questioning
  •       Problem posing
  •  
  •        
  •  
  •               Drawing on past knowledge
  •  
  •               Application to new situations
  •  
  •               Precision of language and thought
  •  
  •               Using all the senses
  •  
  •               Ingenuity, originality,
  • insightfulness and creativity
  •  
  •               Inquisitiveness, curiosity
  •  
  •               Enjoyment of problem solving

23
4 MANGEMENT PLAN
  • BE CONSISTENT ! BE FLEXIBLE!
  • DEVELOP TOOLS TO PROMOTE STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY
    AND AUTONOMY
  • Peer Mediation ?Conflict Resolution
  • ? Working with NOT Doing To Students!

24
SOCIAL SKILLS WE NEED TO TEACH IN THE
LEARNER-CENTERED CLASSROOM
  • FORMATION OF GROUPS
  • SUPPORT
  • COMMUNICATION
  • CONFLICT RESOLUTION

25
FORMATION OF GROUPS
  • FORM GROUPS QUIETLY
  • SIT EYEBALL TO EYEBALL
  • MAKE EYE CONTACT
  • USE EACH OTHERS NAMES
  • SHARE MATERIALS
  • FOLLOW ROLE ASSIGNMENTS

26
TEACH COMMUNICATION SKILLS
  • USE 6-INCH VOICES
  • TAKE TURNS
  • MAKE SURE EVERYONE SPEAKS
  • WAIT UNTIL SPEAKER IS FINISHED
  • BEFORE YOU SPEAK

27
TEACH AND ASSESS FOR CONFLICT RESOLUTION
  • DISAGREE WITH THE IDEA- NOT THE PERSON
  • RESPECT THE OPINIONS OF OTHERS
  • THINK FOR YOURSELF
  • EXPLORE DIFFERENT POINTS OF VIEW
  • NEGOTIATE AND/OR COMPROMISE
  • REACH CONSENSUS

28
ASSESS YOUR GROUP
  • ONE THING WE DID WELL . . .
  • ONE THING WE COULD DO BETTER ON . . .
  • SOCIAL SUPPORTING SKILLS
  • COMMUNICATING SKILLS
  • CONFLICT SOLVING SKILLS
  • ON A 1 (HIGH) TO 5 (LOW) SCALE OUR GROUP IS A
    ___.

29
5 - 6 CLUSTER STANDARDS INTO CONTENT AREAS
  • STANDARDS CAN BE YOUR FRIEND!!
  • LEARNING STANDARDS
  • TPES TO TPAS TO NBCT!
  • THINK OF YOURSELF AS THE HEAD LEARNER
  • PUF--YOUR KNOLWEDGE BUILDING AS AN EFFECTIVE
    TEACHER IS NEVER DONE!!

30
7 FAIL SAFE LESSON DESIGN
  • TEACH THEM.
  • THEN COACH THEM

31
RUBRIC FOR DEVELOPING A CONSTRUCTIVIST LEARNING
LESSON OR UNIT
NOT YET ALMOST THERE GOT IT
ORGANIZATION Hook Engagement Reflection Self-Assessment Dimensionality Hook is not present or ineffective Learners dont get it No plan for student reflection No plan for self assessment No opportunity to move from passive to active learning Hook is somewhat effective Learners get it Good plan for student reflection Good plan for self assessment Good plan for moving from passive to active learning Hook is exceptional in capturing student involvement Learners really get it Exceptional plan for student reflection Exceptional plan for self assessment Exciting plan for moving from passive to active learning
CONSTRUCTIVIST OBJECTIVES Satisfying (intrinsically motivating) Variable (multiple intelligences) Multiple effects (outcomes can lead to varied study) Only 1 - 2 characteristics result in an unsatisfying lesson Only one or two intelligences --limited variability limited effects little or no continuity-integration little or no breadth and depth of content exploration/construction 3 - 6 characteristics result in a motivating lesson Three to four intelligences --some variability Variable effects are visible Good continuity-,integration Good breadth and depth of content exploration/construction 7 - 12 characteristics result in a highly motivating lesson 5 -8 intelligences --exceptional variability Widely -varied effects Excellent continuity-,integration effective breadth and depth of content exploration/construction
COOPERATION Plan for Assigning Teams Plan for Defining Group Roles Plan for Assessing Group Performance If there is a plan for assigning teams and defining roles it is confusing or inappropriate No plan for assessing group performance Good plan for assigning teams Good plan for defining group roles Good plan for assessing group performance Excellent plan for assigning teams Excellent. well devised plan for defining group roles Well conceived plan for assessing group performance
EVALUATION Assessment of learning objectives Assessment of learning dispositions, social skills, intelligent behaviors Assessment of lesson effectiveness Assessment plan is ineffective No plan for assessing dispositions, social skills or intelligent behaviors No plan for assessing lesson effectiveness Assessment of learning objectives is effective Assessment of social skills, learning dispositions, intelligent behaviors is effective Good assessment plan of lesson effectiveness Assessment of learning objectives is exceptional Assessment of social skills, learning dispositions, intelligent behaviors is very well designed Assessment plan of lesson is highly effective
SBELGRAD 1999
32
8 - BUILD YOUR REPERTOIRE OF TEACHING STRATEGIES
  •  Encourage and accept student autonomy,
    initiative and leadership.
  •       
  • Whenever possible, use raw data and primary
    sources along with manipulative, interactive and 
    physical materials.
  • When framing tasks, use cognitive terminology
    like classify, analyze,
  • predict, and so on.
  • Allow student thinking to drive lessons.  Shift
    instructional strategies of alternative content
    based on student responses.
  • Ask students for their theories about the
    concepts before sharing the
  • facts or background of these concepts.
  • Encourage students to engage in dialogue both
    with the teacher and
  • with one another.

  • Brooks
    Brooks, 1999

33
BUILD YOUR REPERTOIRE OF TEACHING STRATEGIES
  • Seek elaboration of students initial responses.
  • Pose contradictions to students hypotheses (in
    diplomatic ways) and
  • then encourage alternative responses.
  • Encourage student inquiry by asking thoughtful,
    open-ended questions
  • and encouraging them to ask questions of others.
  • Allow wait time after posing questions.
  • Provide time for students to discover
    relationships and to create
  • metaphors about the topics of their learning
    experiences.
  • Encourage students to reflect on experiences and
    actions, and then
  • participate in deciding future activities or
    predicting future outcomes


  • Brooks Brooks, 1999

34
9 BECOME AN EXPERT AT AUTHENTIC ASSESSMENT
  • Teacher Made Tests Learning Logs
  • Graphic Organizers Journals
  • Performance Rubrics Checklists
  • Project Rubrics Learning Lists
  • Portfolios, Showcases and Exhibitions


  • Burke, Belgrad
    Fogarty, 2002

35
10 DEVELOP SKILL WITH PARENTS/GUARDIANS
  • Involve parents in the teaching/learning process
  • ? Family/school assignments
  • ? Technology supported lessons
  • ? Parent volunteers to work with children.
  • ? Take a course! Take several workshops!
  • Find early childhood teachers who can share how
    to create winning relationships with parents
    and guardians
  • E. H. Berger Parents as Partners in Education
    Families and Schools Working Together (5th
    Edition)

36
Professional Development of Pedagogical Knowledge
Learn about
37
TEACHER EFFICACY AND REFLECTIVE PRACTICE
  • The teacher is a reflective practitioner who
    continually evaluates the effects of his/her
    choices and actions on others (students, parents,
    and other professionals in the learning
    community) and who actively seeks out
    opportunities to grow professionally.

  • INTASC STD.9

38
Why Effective Teachers Promote Dialogue and
Inquiry
  • INQUIRY IN THE LEARNING COMMUNITY
  • Sharing What is Learned
  • At some point, learners need to go public
    with what they currently know and understand
    about their inquiry sharing what has been
    learned from in-depth investigations.
  • Planning New Inquiries
  • Opportunities for learners to reflect on what
    they know (content), how they came to know
    (process), and why they inquire (purpose and
    goals) an important context for taking a
    reflective stance.

39
DIALOGUE
  • Dialogue is the most fundamental form of
    communication.
  • Dialogue is a social exchange characterized by
    multiple perspectives that encourage the
    construction of deep meaning.
  • Dialogue is central to the development of
    community and of membership within that community.

40
Critical Friends Group Work
  • Four beliefs from Critical Friends Networks that
    are applied in schools that promote teacher
    efficacy
  •  
  •         that school people, working together,
    can make real and lasting improvements in their
    own schools
  •         that teachers and administrators must
    help each other turn theories into practice and
    standards into actual student learning
  •         that the key to this effort is the
    development of a learning community that
    regularly conducts public, collaborative
    examinations of both adult and student work and
  • that to create such a community, practitioners
    need high-quality training and sustained support.

  • Houston Annenberg Challenge

41
TEACHER RESOURCES
  • CLICK HERE
  • TO ACCESS ONLINE LINKS
  • FOR CLASSROOM/INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES AND SUPPORT
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