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Administration and Supervision of Gifted Programs

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Title: Gifted and Talented Academy year 1 Author: Agency Staff Last modified by: Agency Staff Created Date: 2/25/2011 3:00:47 PM Document presentation format – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Administration and Supervision of Gifted Programs


1
Administration and Supervision of Gifted Programs
  • Weekend 1
  • February 25-6, 2011

http//aea11gt.pbworks.com/Admin-of-GT-Programs
2
  • Look with favor upon a bold beginning.
  • --Virgil, Roman poet

3
Winnie the Witch
  • Why do children need gifted services?
  • Winnie the Witch
  • Winnie on the Web
  • Shes even on Facebook!

4
Agenda
  • Welcome and Introductions
  • Goals
  • Norms
  • Iowa Code
  • Foundation
  • Vision
  • Mission
  • Beliefs
  • Program Goals
  • Home Play
  • Closure

5
Course Outcomes
  • To deepen understanding of the components of
    comprehensive gifted and talented programming
  • To determine the extent to which g/t services are
    infused in the total education program
  • To construct and/or improve a written
    comprehensive gifted and talented program plan
  • To determine how to set priorities for g/t
    programming and students served
  • To identify and use data necessary to provide,
    drive, and improve g/t programming

6
Group Norms
  • Talk freely - think out loud
  • Questions establish a culture of curiosity
  • Freedom to change your mind
  • Connect to Iowa Core, previous learning and
    district initiatives
  • Support one another in the learning

7
Introductions
  • Name
  • School
  • Current role/gifted aspiration
  • One important thing you hope to gain from this
    class

8
Reflections
9
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10
What Are You?
  • Enthusiast?
  • Explorer?
  • Sightseer?
  • Vacationer?
  • Prisoner?

11
Iowa Code, NAGC Program Standards, PK-12
National Gifted Education Standards
  • Iowa Code provides requirements in law for
    minimum compliance (Chs. 12 59)
  • NAGC PK-12 Gifted Programming Standards provide
    guidance toward best practices
  • PK-12 National Gifted Education Standards
    identify essential knowledge and skills for
    teachers of gifted

12
Comprehensive Gifted and Talented Programming
  • Comprehensive
  • Including many things
  • Having a wide scope or full view
  • Extensive wide large full compendious
  • (dictionary.com)

13
So what is it?
  • Work with a partner to list the
    components/characteristics of comprehensive
    gifted and talented programming.
  • Think comprehensive physical, comprehensive exam

14
Comprehensive Gifted and Talented Programming
  • Includes and integrates multiple domains of
    giftedness
  • Provides multiple programming options matched to
    student need
  • Addresses both cognitive and affective needs
  • Is articulated K-12
  • Is evolutionary in nature
  • Is essential to and embedded in an effective
    educational program
  • Is based on student need
  • Identifies children with unmet educational needs

15
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16
CONSENSUS
17
Managing Complex Change

Change Confusion


Anxiety

Resistance

Frustration

False Starts
Adapted from Knoster, T., Villa R., Thousand,
J. (2000). A framework for thinking about systems
change. In R. villa J. Thousand (Eds.),
Restructuring for caring and effective education
Piecing the puzzle together (pp. 93-128).
Baltimore Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.
18
Consensus-Building Tool 3 Managing Complex
Change
19
Consensus-Building Tool 3 Managing Complex
Change
20
Consensus-Building Tool 3 Managing Complex
Change
21
Consensus-Building Tool 3 Managing Complex
Change
22
Consensus-Building Tool 3 Managing Complex
Change
23
Talk About It
  • With regard to g/t programming in your district
  • which areas are strengths?
  • which areas need attention/work?

24
Survey Results
  • Download Excel sheet from Wiki
  • Transfer item values
  • Section 1 Vision
  • Section 2 Skills
  • Section 3 Incentives
  • Section 4 Resources
  • Section 5 Action Plan

25
It All Starts With
Vision
Mission
Beliefs
26
Vision
  • What we aspire to
  • Requires stretch
  • Example
  • ITAG envisions a time when all students,
    including the gifted and talented, are given an
    appropriate educational experience that matches
    their abilities and potential, where they have
    abundant opportunities for their intellectual and
    creative challenge and growth, and those who work
    with them are effectively trained to appreciate,
    understand, and nurture their unique talents and
    needs.

27
Sample Vision
  • Waukee New learning all day every day for each
    identified gifted child.
  • Consider In what ways will vision impact
    programming?

28
Victory Circle
  • Three years from now, the DE awards your district
    the Outstanding GT Program distinction for the
    state.
  • What would we see, hear, experience, etc. that
    would give credence to the award?

Group 1 Group 2 Group 3
29
Creating Stretch
  • What aspects of your victory are worthy of
    achieving but would require significant stretch?
  • Consider these ideas to help you write a
    statement of vision.

30
S-W-O-R Analysis
  • What are the strengths in our school that would
    help us achieve our victory?
  • What weaknesses do we need to overcome?
  • What opportunities exist if we achieve our
    victory?
  • What risks do we face along the way?

31
Mission/Philosophy
  • Answers the questions
  • What is our purpose?
  • Why does the program(ming) exist?
  • What it does
  • Creates cohesiveness, commitment, and
    understanding
  • Gives meaning to our work
  • Choosing how well work
  • What work we choose to do
  • --Conzemius ONeill, 2002

32
Traits
  • Comprehensiveness
  • Rationale
  • Consistency
  • Clarity
  • --Purcell Eckert, 2006

33
Sample Mission/Philosophy
  • The mission of the Iowa Talented and Gifted
    Association is to recognize, support, and respect
    the unique and diverse needs of talented and
    gifted learners through
  • ADVOCACY
  • by encouraging informed educational
    professionals, parents, policy makers, and all
    other stakeholders to take appropriate action for
    the benefit of talented and gifted learners.
  • EDUCATION
  • by strengthening and encouraging the recognition
    and implementation of practices that support
    identification of talented and gifted learners
    and accommodation of the social, emotional, and
    intellectual levels.
  • NETWORKINGby increasing opportunities for
    collaboration and cooperation among all
    stakeholders with the goal of advancing the
    abilities and developing the potential of
    talented and gifted learners.

34
Beliefs
  • are firmly held
  • guide what we do
  • influence practice

35
Assumptions
  • What assumptions do you hold about gifted
    children? ( or -)
  • What assumptions do classroom teachers,
    administrators, and parents in your
    district/building hold?

Group 1 Group 2 Group 3
36
Putting It All Together
  • Consider
  • desired state (victory)
  • components requiring stretch
  • current state (S-W-O-R)
  • why your program exists
  • assumptions which drive beliefs
  • Create a draft of your vision, mission/philosophy,
    and beliefs.

37
Evaluating Your Mission/Philosophy
  • Rate your mission/philosophy with regard to
  • Comprehensiveness
  • Rationale
  • Consistency
  • Clarity

38
Sample
  • Academically talented children in Jonesville may
    possess characteristics that necessitate
    qualitatively different instruction. Our program
    is designed to provide the atmosphere for
    stimulating above-average-ability students.

Trait 5 4 3 2 1
Comprehensiveness
Rationale
Consistency
Clarity
--Purcell Eckert, 2006
39
Sample
  • Academically talented children in Jonesville may
    possess characteristics that necessitate
    qualitatively different instruction. Our program
    is designed to provide the atmosphere for
    stimulating above-average-ability students.

Trait 5 4 3 2 1
Comprehensiveness X
Rationale X
Consistency X
Clarity X
--Purcell Eckert, 2006
40
Makeover
  • The mission of the Jonesville School District is
    to ensure that each child has equal opportunity
    to receive a suitable program of educational
    experiences. The school board recognizes that
    some students possess, or are capable of
    possessing, extraordinary learning ability and/or
    outstanding talent. These students come from all
    socioeconomic, cultural, and ethnic backgrounds.
    The school board affirms the following

41
  • Curricular modifications as described in our
    comprehensive program design will occur in the
    regular classroom to provide continuous levels of
    challenge for all students, including those with
    unique gifts and talents.
  • In addition to the regular classroom, a range of
    instructional settings, both within the school as
    well as the community, will be available for
    specialized instruction that is integrated with
    the regular curriculum and the intellectual and
    social and emotional needs of gifted and talented
    children.
  • It is the responsibility of the school district
    and the larger community to ensure the following
  • Ongoing identification of gifted and talented
    children
  • Provision of appropriate and systematic
    educational services to meet the unique learning
    needs of gifted and talented children.
  • --Purcell Eckert, 2006, p. 18-19

42
Building Consensus
  • Determine
  • With whom you will share
  • How you will determine/build consensus
  • Reflect on
  • How the message was received
  • Further work needed

43
Program Evaluation
  • Baseline data
  • Complete Self-Audit/Reflection section(s)
  • Bring results to next session
  • Basis for program goals
  • Means to improve programming

44
Goals and Performance Measures
  • Program Goals
  • Provide focus for evaluation and planning
  • Provide direction toward a particular purpose
  • living - will be revised as needed
  • Based on clear mission and definition of
    giftedness (target population)
  • --Purcell Eckert, p. 63

45
Goals and Performance Measures
  • Performance Measures
  • What does success look like?
  • How will we know when we get there?
  • What data will we collect?
  • How good is good enough?

46
Traits
  • Alignment
  • Validity
  • Comprehensiveness
  • Clarity
  • Purcell Eckert, p. 64-5

47
Using SART to Establish Program Goals
  • Complete selected sections of the
    Self-Audit/Reflection Tool.
  • Identify area(s) most in need of improvement.
  • Target goal(s) to the area.
  • At the end of the year review the SART section
    and data to ascertain goal attainment.

48
Sample Program Goals
  • Urbandale
  • District 196, Minnesota
  • Based on NAGC Program Standards

49
Examine Your Program Goals
  • Do you have program goals?
  • Are they program goals or student outcomes?
  • Whats the difference?
  • Why is each important?
  • How do they stack up against the traits of
    high-quality goals on p. 64?

50
Memory Mingle
  1. How has the information youve engaged with so
    far pushed your thinking?
  2. Share in triads
  3. Identify connections and/or conclusions
  4. Share with large group

51
Gifted and Talented Identification
  • What is it?
  • Why do it?
  • What then?

52
The Target Population
  • Definition of gifted
  • Multiple Criteria used/analyzed

53
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54
State of Iowa Definition
  • General Intellectual Ability
  • Specific Ability Aptitude
  • Creativity
  • Leadership
  • Visual and Performing Arts

55
Characteristics
  • With your team
  • Review areas in your target population
  • Talk about the assessments that help you find
    kids in each category
  • How is that working?
  • What other assessments might you need?

56
Starting the Process
  • Screening
  • Use existing data sources
  • Nomination/Referral
  • Who may/should refer?
  • How will they do it?
  • How will they know they can?

57
Digging Deeper
  • What stands out about the child?
  • What more do you need to know?
  • Cast a wider net
  • No single piece of data screens a child in or
    out
  • Are the criteria valid for the construct being
    measured?
  • How will you analyze the information?
  • At what point can you make a decision with
    confidence?
  • Notification

58
Multiple Measures?
59
Multiple Hurdles?
60
Activity
  • Consider the list of multiple criteria
  • Identify which area(s) of giftedness for which
    each would be a valid criterion to consider.
  • Are all the criteria appropriate at all grade
    spans?
  • Add other examples at the bottom.
  • Share with someone you havent yet worked with
    today.

61
Matrix
62
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63
Placement
  • Which children need which services?
  • Not about assigning a label
  • According to need

64
Some Things to Ponder
  • Once identified, always identified?
  • Procedure for staffing out?
  • Your questions?

65
Gap Analysis
  • With your team
  • Study Guiding Principles, Attributes That Define
    High-Quality Identification Procedures (p. 51-2),
    and SART results
  • Identify desired state
  • Outline your current identification procedures
    (current state)
  • List steps needed to move toward desired state

66
Home Play
  • Complete two sections of SA/RT
  • Program Goals
  • Identification
  • Share draft of Mission/Philosophy with GT
    Advisory, Administrative Team, and/or School
    Board
  • Get input
  • Get mission/philosophy approved
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