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POETIC DEVICES

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Title: POETIC DEVICES & POETIC FORMS Author: peeplek2 Last modified by: Katherine Young Created Date: 3/17/2010 3:08:47 PM Document presentation format – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: POETIC DEVICES


1
POETIC DEVICES POETIC FORMS
  • Grade 8 ELA
  • K Peeples

2
POETIC DEVICES
PART ONE
3
Poetic Devices
  • Techniques, styles, or word choices
  • an author or poet makes in order to
  • communicate with the audience

assonance rhyme alliteration
refrain onomatopoeia imagery
4
POETIC DEVICES
  • ASSONANCE
  • Repetition of the same vowel sound(s) in a
    sentence or line.
  • Mark the examples of
  • assonance in 1 on your
  • worksheet.
  • ALLITERATION
  • Repetition of the same consonant sound(s) in a
    sentence or line.
  • Mark the examples of
  • alliteration in 2 on your
  • worksheet.

5
POETIC DEVICES
  • ASSONANCE
  • Repetition of the same vowel sound(s) in a
    sentence or line.
  • How soon unaccountable I became tired and sick,
  • Till rising and gliding out I wander'd off by
    myself.
  • (Walt Whitman,
  • When I Heard the Learnd Astronomer)
  • ALLITERATION
  • Repetition of the same consonant sound(s) in a
    sentence or line.
  • While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there
    came a tapping,
  • As of someone gently rapping, rapping at my
    chamber door.
  • (Edgar Allan Poe, The Raven)

6
POETIC DEVICES
  • ASSONANCE
  • Repetition of the same vowel sound(s) in a
    sentence or line.
  • Remember
  • Assonance begins with A, and
  • A is a vowel.
  • ALLITERATION
  • Repetition of the same consonant sound(s) in a
    sentence or line.
  • Remember
  • Tongue Twisters need alliteration!
  • Peter Piper picked

7
ONOMATOPOEIA
  • Using words that imitate (make) the same sound
    they describe.

8
ONOMATOPOEIA
  • Find the examples of onomatopoeia in the lines
    from Edgar Allan Poes poem The Bells.
  • (3 on your worksheet.)

9
ONOMATOPOEIA
What sound is being created?
bells
Which words are making that sound?
10
RHYME
  • RHYME SCHEME the pattern of end rhymes in a poem

END RHYME matching vowel or consonant sounds
at the end of each line (usually in at least 2
different schemes)
INTERNAL RHYME words or sounds within one or two
lines that rhyme with each other
11
RHYME SCHEME
  • To keep track of the pattern of rhymed
  • sounds at the ends of the lines of a poem, we
  • use letters to mark words that rhyme with each
  • other.

Twinkle, twinkle, little star How I wonder what
you are Up above the world, so high Like a
diamond in the sky
This is an example of end rhyme.
12
RHYME SCHEME (end Rhyme)
Twinkle, twinkle, little star How I wonder what
you are Up above the world, so high Like a
diamond in the sky
a
a
b
b
Which lines rhyme?
1 and 2 3 and 4
Mark the first pair with a.
Mark the second pair with b.
13
RHYME SCHEME (INternal Rhyme)
  • INTERNAL RHYMES are rhymed words that are
  • found in the same line of a poem. They are not
  • marked with letters, but they may be underlined
  • or circled.

Back into the chamber turning, all my
soul within me burning -Edgar Allan Poe,
from The Raven
This is an example of internal rhyme. Which words
rhyme in these lines?
14
REFRAIN
  • A repeated sound, word, phrase, line, or group of
    lines.

Refrains may be used to build rhythm, to increase
suspense, or to emphasize a theme.
Refrains can be found in just about any songs
lyrics religious songs, rock songs, country
songs, chorus songs, RB songs
15
REFRAIN
16
REFRAIN
17
IMAGERY
  • Using language (words phrases) that DESCRIBE
    places, people, etc

Author/poet tries to interest the readers
IMAGINATION
Might include descriptions about Color (visual
imagery) Sounds (onomatopoeia) Touch (rough,
smooth, cool, warm, etc) Smell (sweet, flowery,
perfumed, etc) Taste (bitter, sweet, sour, etc)
MOST COMMON
18
IMAGERY
  • Annotate the poem
  • Long Island Sound for examples of imagery.

HINT There are examples of VISUAL, SOUND, and
TOUCH imagery in this poem.
19
IMAGERY
20
POETIC FORMS
PART TWO
21
Poetic FORMs
  • Poems can take many forms.

Some poetic forms are named for the way that the
poem itself actually looks.
A diamante poem is shaped like a diamond
___ _____
___________ _______________ ___________
_____ ___
An acrostic poem has lines whose 1st letter
spells out the subject of the poem.
S_____________, C_____________,
H_____________, O_____________.
O______________, L______________.
22
LIMERICK
A limerick is a very short humorous or
nonsense poem. It always has exactly 5 lines and
an aabba rhyme scheme. It tells a brief story or
gives a short (sometimes rude!) description.
23
ode
An ode is a long poem that praises a
specific person, object, or event. It can be
rhymed or unrhymed.
24
Narrative POEM
A narrative poem tells a story. Just like any
other story, it has at least one main character,
a setting, and a plot.
25
Free Verse
A free verse poem has no regular meter and no
rhyme scheme. Free verse poems are meant to sound
like everyday speech or conversation. They often
use strong imagery, onomatopoeia, and other
poetic devices.
26
ELEGY
An elegy is a poem of mourning, written in
honor of someone who has died. (THINK EULOGY
same word root!!!)
Walt Whitman wrote this poem as an elegy for
President Abraham Lincoln, following his
assassination in 1865.
27
Haiku
A haiku is a poem with exactly 3 lines and
exactly 17 syllables. Haikus were first written
in ancient Japan. A haiku always has this pattern
5 syllables 7 syllables 5 syllables
Haikus are very often written about nature
seasons, animals, etc.
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