Latino%20Immigrants%20and%20Refugees%20%20by:%20Andria%20Henrie - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Latino%20Immigrants%20and%20Refugees%20%20by:%20Andria%20Henrie

Description:

Latino Immigrants and Refugees by: Andria Henrie * Welcome class to another day of history. Today we are going to be learning about a few people in Latino history. – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:40
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 20
Provided by: yola360
Learn more at: http://andriahenrie.yolasite.com
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Latino%20Immigrants%20and%20Refugees%20%20by:%20Andria%20Henrie


1
Latino Immigrants and Refugees by Andria
Henrie
2
Introduction
  • As part of my presentation I am going to have you
    watch this slide show as if you are taking a high
    school history class. You will read in the notes
    section exactly what I would say to my class.
  • My lesson plan
  • Welcome and instructions
  • Note taking from power point presentation
  • After taking notes start
  • Episode 1 Foreigners in their own land PBS Video
    Latino Americans

3
A look at Latino's in history
  • Many people have this popular vision of Latinos
    as people who arrived the day before yesterday.
    But when you think about the first European
    settlement in what would become the United
    States, it's St. Augustine, in 1565. That
    predates Jamestown in 1607, by almost 40 years.
    The first European language spoken, in what would
    become the United States, it's Spanish.
  • Vicki Ruiz, Chicano Scholar and historian.
  • Foreigners in their own land, Latino Americans
  • PBS Special Latino Americans Episode 1

4
Vaqueras/Cowgirls
  • Cowgirls/Vaqueras.
  • Circa early 1900s. Courtesy
  • of Ocampo Family Collection.
  • Department of archives and manuscripts,
  • Arizona State University, Tempe.

5
Famous Latino/Latina Voices
  • Apolinaria Lorenana
  • Captain Nepomuceno Seguin
  • Mariano Vallejo
  • Carlos Juan Finlay

6
Apolinaria Lorenzana (La Beata, the Pious one)
1790-1884
  • Apolinaria was seven years old and an orphan when
    sent by the Spanish Colonial Government of Mexico
    to help populate to the farthest reaches of it's
    American Empire. Apolinaria has said that when
    the group of twenty two orphan girls reached the
    capital at Monterey, the government gave them all
    away like puppies to the local residents. All of
    the orphans were given the last name Lorenzana,
    which was the last name of their benefactor the
    Arch Bishop of Toledo. Alpolinaria later became
    known as Apolinaria la Cuna. By the time that she
    had settle in Montery the Spanish had dominated
    the New World for over three centuries. By 1808,
    Apolinaria had reached her teenage years and
    brought to Mission, San Diego, it was the first
    Mission founded by Spanish Priests. As a young
    child in Mexico she was taught to read, however
    she had always wanted to learn to write. When she
    was a young girl she taught herself to write by
    copying letters from various books. She would
    practice on any piece of paper she could find,
    even old cigarette wrappings.
  • She was largely responsible of a school owned by
    a Californio widow's where children were taught
    various skills, such as reading, writing, cooking
    and sewing. Apolinaria never married, but was a
    god parent to numerous children.
  • Apolinaria Lorenzana
  • (La Beata, the Pious one) 1790-1884
  • Page 2

7
Apolinaria Lorenzana
  • Apolinaria was the recipient of two government
    land grants, Santa Clara de Jamacha in 1840 and
    Buena Esperanza de los Coches in 1843. She was a
    sponsor to close to 200 children both
    Californio's and Indian children. She was given
    quite a few responsibilities from teacher,
    seamstress, supervising the sick, training women
    to wash and sew the church linens. She had the
    authority to select goods that were not included
    on lists from the missionaries. She also played a
    role in helping to transform the indigenous
    population of San Diego area into Spanish
    subjects. One of her greatest grievance was
    associated with the arrival of US Troops. Not
    only was she a witness to American invasion but
    she also suffered the fate of many Californios as
    a consequence of American domination, she had
    lost her land.
  • At the end of her life, she was nearly blind and
    knew she didn't have much time left, Apolinaria
    shared her memories with Thomas Savage an
    American Historian. In the end of her life she
    was blind, penniless and a charge of the country.
    She is remembered as a true example of the high
    level of authority and respect achieved by some
    mixed-race women of the Caliornia Frontier.
  • Lorenzana, Apolinaria, 1878. Memories de dona
    Apolinaria Lorenzana La Beata dictadas por ella
    en Sanda Barbara en marzo de 1878 a Thomas
    Savage, Bancroft Library.

8
Captain Juan Nepomuceno Seguin 1806-1890
  • Juan Seguín was born in San Antonio, and married
    the daughter of one of the area's wealthiest
    ranching families. They had ten children. He held
    a variety of regional political positions until
    becoming involved in the military, supporting the
    Federalist government in 1835.
  • Seguín was a strong supporter of the federalist
    principles which Santa Anna betrayed. A man more
    of action than words, he organized a company of
    Tejano soldiers that would play an invaluable
    role in the Texan cause. Seguín's Tejano unit
    fought bravely at the Battle of San Jacinto, and
    followed the defeated Centralist to the Rio
    Grande, ensuring their departure.
  • A thoughtful and literate man, Seguín kept
    careful memoirs of the events at San Jacinto. In
    the Personal Memoirs of John N. Seguín, he
    recalled the gallantry and passion with which his
    unit fought. Indeed, the service of Tejano troops
    was indispensable throughout the revolution.
  • Seguín served his country in a number of
    political roles including Congressman and
    Senator, and as the Mayor of San Antonio (two
    consecutive terms). Caught in escalating tensions
    between Mexican and Anglo Texans, he was
    eventually incriminated in a Mexican plot to
    re-take San Antonio.
  • He fled his beloved homeland for Mexico where he
    tried to build a new life for his family. During
    the Mexican War, he was forced by the Mexican
    government to take up arms against the United
    States. He returned to Texas as soon as possible,
    where he continued his political service.
  • Seguín died in Nuevo Laredo in 1890. His remains
    were returned to Texas in 1974, and buried at
    Seguin, the town named in his honor.
  • "San Jancinto Museum of History." San Jacinto
    Museum of History. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Mar. 2014.

9
Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo, 1807-1890
  • If he was not actually the founder of
    California's diversity, Vallejo was certainly
    one of it's chief architects

July 4, 1807. The eighth of thirteen children.
1822 - 1826. Vallejo served as personal secretary
to Governor Arguello entered military service as
a cadet at Monterey and became a member of the
territorial legislature. 1829. Vallejo defeated
a large force of Miwok Indians at Indian Mission
Estanislao 1832. He married Francisca Benicia
Carrillo after waiting two years for official
approval. They were to become the parents of 16
children and at least two adopted children
(Vallejo's illegitimate children). His land
acreage (175,000 acres) was comprised of gifts,
purchases, and awards for services or debts owned
him. 1833. Vallejo became Military Commandant
of the San Francisco Presidio "Sonoma State
University." Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo North
Bay Regional Special Collections SSU
Library. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Mar. 2014.
10
Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo, 1807-1890

"Sonoma State University." Mariano
Guadalupe Vallejo North Bay Regional
Special Collections SSU Library. N.p., n.d.
Web. 16 Mar. 2014.
  • 1834. At his own expense, he outfitted and fed
    the Mexican troops at Sonoma for the next ten
    years. He began building his new home, La Casa
    Grande, on the Sonoma plaza
  • 1835. Vallejo became director of colonization
    (the only person empowered to grant land) in the
    Northern frontier.

June 10, 1846. Bear Flag Revolt. Vallejo was
arrested in his own home by American
frontiersmen. After signing articles of
capitulation, Mariano and his brother Salvador
(and others) were jailed for two months at
Sutter's Fort. The Bear Flag was raised at
Sonoma, signifying the separate Republic of
California. Less than a month later it was
replaced with the Stars and Stripes. Vallejo's
health was seriously jeopardized during
imprisonment and much of his property stolen.
11
Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo, 1807-1890
  • 1849. Vallejo was a delegate to the state
    constitutional convention and elected state
    senator. At the convention he promoted
    permitting Indians to vote, making slavery
    illegal in California, allowing wives to hold
    separate property, both real and personal.
  • Vallejo became an honored guest or speaker at
    most public events but declined an offer to run
    for Lt. Governor he visited native Californios
    and collected their reminiscences for Hubert H.
    Bancroft he learned sign language so that he
    could communicate with students at a school for
    the handicapped and he commissioned artists,
    such as, Oriana Day, to depict California history
    and the mission era.
  • Bottom left hand photo is Vallejo with his
    daughters.
    Bottom Right hand photo is Vallejo with wife
    Francisca Benicia Carrillo de Vallejo.
  • "Sonoma State University." Mariano Guadalupe
    Vallejo North Bay Regional Special
    Collections SSU Library. N.p., n.d. Web. 16
    Mar. 2014.

12
Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo, 1807-1890 If he was
not actually the founder of California's
diversity, Vallejo was certainly one of it's
chief architects
1855. Vallejo is granted only 48,700 of the
117,875 in claims against the US government for
damages incurred during the war with Mexico.
Meanwhile his lands were occupied by squatters,
some milking his cows in the middle of the night!
To make financial ends meet, his wife, Francisca
sold produce to local hotel. Most income would
come from the water company that supplied
Sonoma. 1866. Vallejo lost ownership of his home
in Sonoma and had to pay rent to remain. Several
years later, son-in-law John Frisbie, Vallejo's
power of attorney and manager of Vallejo's funds,
purchased Lachryma Montis and deeded it to
Francisca. 1867. Vallejo's former home, La Casa
Grande, burned to the ground, taking with it his
original five-volume manuscript, History of
California . January 18, 1890. Vallejo died at
Sonoma. His only remaining property was his home.
"Sonoma State University." Mariano Guadalupe
Vallejo North Bay Regional Special
Collections SSU Library. N.p., n.d. Web. 16
Mar. 2014.
  • Detail from a 19th century lithograph showing
    Lachryma Montis. (Bancroft Library, University of
    California Berkeley)
  • 1850's. Vallejo donated a five square mile tract
    of land for development of a port at Benicia and
    donated 156 acres for a state capitol at Vallejo
    (originally proposed to be named "Eureka"). He
    offered 370,000 for construction of public
    buildings (including a university, governor's
    mansion, capitol building, orphanage, and insane
    asylum). The Vallejo family moved to a new home
    in Sonoma, Lachryma Montis (Tear of the Mountain)
  • Carlos Juan Finlay 1833-1915

13
Cuban Epidemiologist
  • Carlos Juan Finlay solved the mystery of what
    caused yellow fever. This deadly disease had no
    known cure just over 100 years ago and killed
    thousands of people.
  • In 1881, he discovered that mosquitoes spread
    yellow fever, but he could not prove it. Other
    scientist did not believe him and made fun of him
    calling him the mosquito man. Eventually, because
    of the work that Finaly and Walter Reed, another
    important physician, scientists were able to
    develop a vaccine using diseased mosquitoes and
    conquer this disease.
  • Finlay was appointed chief of sanitation officer
    of Cuba (1902-09), and after his death the Finlay
    institute for investigations in Tropical medicine
    was created in his honor by the Cuban government.
  • The Editors of Encyclopedia Britannica. "Carlos
    J. Finlay (Cuban Physician)." Encyclopedia
    Britannica Online. Encyclopedia Britannica, n.d.
    Web. 16 Mar. 2014.
  • Latinos in Utah

14
Strike- breakers and Agricultural
  • November 1912- Thousands of Mexicans, most of
    them single men, got off the train in Bingham,
    Utah. They had come to work in the Utah Copper
    mine as strikebreakers. Most were there to
    replace miners who were refusing to work until
    management improved working conditions and
    salaries. Most lived in boardinghouses and sent
    money back home to families. The striking miners
    despised them for working while they were
    striking. Most of them returned home when the
    strikes were over.
  • In the early 20th century many Hispanic/Latinos
    came to San Juan County to work with sheep and
    other livestock. Many worked on the railroad.
    Sugar beet farming drew many Latino families to
    northern Utah, especially during World War I.
  • Taking care of sugar beets is back-breaking work,
    from planting, to thinning, to weeding, to
    harvesting. Field workers labored long hours in
    the heat, bent over most of the day and they
    didn't get paid very well. Many pulled their
    children out of school to help work.
  • When things got worse during the Great
    Depression, many more Latino workers and their
    families left Utah. For those who remained life
    was hard. On top of already low wages, falling
    prices of sugar beets, Utah experience a drought
    in the 1930s.
  • In the picture to the right you see The Rogue
    Garcia Family in Montiello, Utah, in 1927.
  • "Utah State History." Latinos in Utah. N.p., n.d.
    Web. 16 Mar. 2014.

15
Latinos in Utah Railroads and Mines
  • Large numbers of Latino immigrants worked on the
    railroad or in the mines.
  • Men called traqueros worked in crews that
    repaired the rail lines and helped with their
    upkeep. Some of their families lived in old rail
    cars that weren't being used anymore, next to or
    near the tracks.
  • In Utah during the 1920s and 1930s Utah had set
    up their hiring and firing policies based on who
    was in the state first. So the earliest settlers
    were paid higher wages and were able to work for
    job with higher prestige. Then as different
    groups settled or moved to Utah they would take
    the lowest paying, and most dangerous jobs, such
    as mining, agriculture and railroads.
  • This all came with a lot of resentment and racial
    prejudice, usually targeted at the last group
    through the door of Utah. So at this time, even
    though Utah once belonged to Mexico, one of the
    last groups to come in before the Depression was
    the Latinos, and they were the first to be fired.
  • "Utah State History." Latinos in Utah. N.p., n.d.
    Web. 16 Mar. 2014.

Traqueros worked to maintain railroad tracks.
16
Puerto Ricans
  • The onset of World War II disrupted many Latino
    families in Utah. The army and navy drafted
    husbands and brothers in response, some Latinas
    and their daughters moved to Salt Lake City
    looking for jobs that allowed them to support
    their families. With the shortage of men in the
    state led government officials to recruit
    hundreds of Puerto Ricans from New York City.
    This group of Spanish-speaking people increased
    the diversity of the Latino population. Like the
    Mexicans of the 1910s, Puerto Ricans of the 1940s
    were mainly single males who left their families
    behind.
  • Not accustomed to mine labor or to the
    intra-ethnic conflicts with Mexicans, Mexican
    Americans, and Spanish Americans, most Puerto
    Ricans left the state. Only ten Puerto Rican
    families settled down and remained in Utah. These
    families became very successful and were able to
    buy houses. A few became leaders of the civil
    rights movement of the 1960s and 1970s in Utah.
  • In 1967 there were no more than ten Latino
    students at the University of Utah the majority
    of them lacked financial support and worked as
    busboys in sorority houses as janitors, as
    ditch-diggers, for the county or similar jobs.
    Mike Melendez, who was born in Bingham Canyon,
    later said that his parents only contributed five
    or ten dollars per month to his academic
    expenses. In spite of these barriers, Melendez
    graduated and became a minority adviser at the
    University of Utah. As an adviser, he was
    especially interested in recruiting Latinas. He
    believed education would be an asset to woman in
    case something happened to their husbands, and it
    was a good thing to pass on to children.
    Melendez's mother had been perhaps the first
    Latina to graduate from the University of Utah
    she obtained a nursing degree in 1942.
  • Beehive History 25 Families. Salt Lake City, UT
    Utah State Historical Society, 1999. Print.

17
Latina's in Utah
  • Nominated as a Women of Charity, Edith Roblez
    Melendez, Prominent civic and community leader,
    particularly with regard to Hispanic concerns.
    Melendez was integral in the founding of Jordan
    School District Cultural Awareness as well as
    SOCIO (Spanish Organization for Community,
    Integrity, and Opportunity). She was also
    Outreach Director for the Utah State Food Stamp
    Program, adviser to the University of Utah
    College of Sciences program for Ethnic Affairs,
    and a member on the Governors Hispanic Council
    under Governor Scott Matheson.
  • Nominated as a Women in the Arts, Ruby Chacon,
    Rising Utah artist most notable for her paintings
    of the Mexican family, particularly the stories
    and traditions of her multicultural background
    and -- in Chacón's words -- her experience as a
    Utahna, a Chicana, and an Artist. A graduate of
    the University of Utah, Chacón has been featured
    in many of the states most widely circulated
    newspapers, magazines, and books. She also has an
    extensive list of gallery shows and exhibitions
    in Utah, California, England, and Japan. Chacón
    was named one of Salt Lake Tribunes Utahns of
    the Year in 2006. She has also received the
    Governors Mansion Award and the Mayors Award,
    both for visual arts.
  • Nominated as a Women of Charity, Maria L. Salazar
    y Trujillo, Lifelong advocate of foster children
    who personally mothered nearly 100 children,
    including some with severe behavioral problems,
    from the early 1950s until her death in 1987.
    Trujillo not only devoted her life to foster
    children, she also recruited other foster
    mothers. Trujillo was an active member of the
    Catholic Women's League and the Third Order of
    St. Francis. She was also involved in the early
    organization of La Morena Café, which provides
    food, fellowship, and job training to vulnerable
    citizens as well as funding for other outreach
    programs.
  • Welch, Michele. "Utah Womens Walk." Utah Womens
    Walk. Honoring Women in Utah, n.d. Web. 16 Mar.
    2014.

18
Summary
  • This part of the summary is for me. I have
    learned more than I bargained for in doing this
    assignment. I could have added so many more pages
    about the wonderful and amazing Latino people.
    Researching about this culture has given me an
    insight that I needed in order to become a
    Multicultural teacher. I am going to be able to
    take away from this project not just knowledge
    but a new perspective of how differences can be
    made into a positive. After all of the research I
    did, the main feelings I have were of sadness,
    that we as humans feel we have a right to take
    land, voices, languages, heritage, and culture
    from certain people. You might notice that I had
    a little more information about Vallejo in my
    presentation. That was on purpose, I had watched
    a video about him and I couldn't help but feel
    the sadness he felt at being betrayed by people
    he thought were his allies. He had always
    considered himself a very hospitable person and
    could not imagine that anyone would want to take
    from he. He was a generous person who gave a lot
    to the community and the land that he loved. It
    never even entered his mind that the very people
    he was helping was the first to imprison him.
    Unfortunately, their story of heartache and
    betrayal was all too familiar. Through out
    history it seems, there are people who are the
    victors and people who are the victims. It is
    amazing that even today we have so many trying to
    fight for the exact same rights that is entitled
    to all, not just some!

19
References and Resources
  • Vicki Ruiz, Chicano Scholar and historian.
    Foreigners in their own land, Latino
    Americans,PBS Special Latino Americans Episode 1
  • Department of archives and manuscripts, Arizona
    State University, Tempe.
  • Lorenzana, Apolinaria, 1878. Memories de dona
    Apolinaria Lorenzana La Beata dictadas por ella
    en Sanda Barbara en marzo de 1878 a Thomas
    Savage, Bancroft Library.
  • "San Jancinto Museum of History." San Jacinto
    Museum of History. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Mar. 2014.
  • "Sonoma State University." Mariano Guadalupe
    Vallejo North Bay Regional Special
    Collections SSU Library. N.p., n.d. Web. 16
    Mar. 2014.
  • "Utah State History." Latinos in Utah. N.p., n.d.
    Web. 16 Mar. 2014
  • Beehive History 25 Families. Salt Lake City, UT
    Utah State Historical Society, 1999. Print.
  • Welch, Michele. "Utah Womens Walk." Utah Womens
    Walk. Honoring Women in Utah, n.d. Web. 16 Mar.
    2014.
  • PBS Latino Americans Episode 1 Foreigners in
    their own land
  • PbS. org
About PowerShow.com