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Teaching Engineers

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Teaching Engineers everything you wanted to know in 90 minutes or less College of Engineering New Faculty Orientation August 24, 2011 Thomas F. Wolff Richard W ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Teaching Engineers


1
  • Teaching Engineers
  • everything you wanted to know in 90 minutes or
    less
  • College of Engineering
  • New Faculty Orientation
  • August 24, 2011
  • Thomas F. Wolff Richard W. Lyles
  • Associate Dean Professor, CEE
  • wolff_at_egr.msu.edu lyles_at_egr.msu.edu
  • 355-5128 355-2250

2
Overview
  • The role of teaching in the college
  • Nuts and bolts, rules and regulations
  • Accreditation, Assessment and Evaluation
  • Tips and tricks How to survive, succeed,
    facilitate learning, and inspire

3
The Role of Teaching
  • Your priorities
  • Teaching vs. research
  • Teaching in the promotion and tenure process
  • Teaching? Or facilitating learning?
  • College is moving aggressively in reaching out to
    freshmen

4
Nuts and Bolts -- Rules and Regulations
  • Admission to Engineering
  • Grading systems and policies
  • Semester calendars
  • Code of Teaching Responsibility
  • Syllabus
  • Attendance
  • Exams
  • Privacy
  • Accommodations for Persons with Disabilities
  • Academic Dishonesty

5
Admission to Engineering
  • New freshmen are admitted to the university and
    may freely declare any major, regardless of
    academic preparation
  • Students are admitted to engineering (access to
    3rd and 4th year classes) after
  • Completing six core courses
  • Attaining a required GPA

6
Grading systems
  • Grades may be 4.0, 3.5, 3.0, 2.5, 2.0, 1.5, 1.0,
    0.0, I
  • For grades below 2.0, 1.0 provides credit but is
    repeatable, 0.0 fails, but is repeatable.
  • Maximum repeat credits is 20, unless approved by
    Associate Dean (delegated to Advising Director)
  • When course is repeated, second grade replaces
    the first in the GPA, both show on transcript.
  • Students with 2.0 and 2.5 grades sometimes
    request a lower grade (?)

7
Semester Calendars
  • During first five class days, students may freely
    add classes for which they have prerequisites,
    and for which there are seats. Prerequisite and
    space overrides require department approval.
  • During the first four weeks of class, students
    may drop a class without a grade, and receive a
    full refund.
  • Until mid-semester, students may drop a class
    without a grade.
  • After that date, students may only drop based on
    extenuating circumstances with approval of
    Associate Deans office.
  • Incomplete (I) grades may be awarded in certain
    extenuating circumstances.

8
Code of Teaching Responsibility
  • Ombudsmans web site
  • www.msu.edu/unit/ombud
  • Code of Teaching Responsibility
  • https//www.msu.edu/unit/ombud/CodeofT.html
  • Faculty are bound to the code. It is one of the
    few real codified obligations of faculty
  • Faculty have much leeway around attendance,
    grading, etc., but are required to communicate
    what they will do and expect
  • Includes syllabus, attendance and work ownership
    policies. More to come about syllabi

9
Exams
  • Classes meet for two hours during final exam
    week, whether a final exam is given or not
  • If a final exam is given, it must be given at the
    scheduled time (and NOT the last day/week of
    classes)
  • Final exam times rotate from year to year
  • Students are not required to take more than two
    exams in the same calendar day, and there are
    rules for make-up times

10
Privacy
  • Federal Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)
  • University policies (somewhat more strict)
  • Course work, performance, etc. are a private
    matter between you and student not classmates,
    roommates, friends, or even other faculty or
    parents

11
Accommodations
  • Persons with disabilities have the right to a
    reasonable accommodation under the Americans with
    Disabilities Act (ADA)
  • Certification of these rights are handled by the
    Resource Center for Persons with Disabilities
    (RCPD).
  • Student is obligated to give you prior notice of
    the need for an accommodation with a VISA form
  • Accommodation may mean additional time on exams
    or a separate test location
  • Questions should be referred to Dr. Wolff or the
    RCPD

12
Academic Dishonesty
  • If you believe academic dishonesty has occurred,
    you may
  • Award a penalty grade on the assignment or exam
  • Award a 0.0 for the course
  • The action is reported to the University with an
    electronic form linked from the Registrars
    Instructor System
  • This is copied to the student student has rights
    of appeal
  • Instructor may choose to recommend additional
    sanctions
  • If a report is filed, student is required to take
    a zero-credit remedial course, with significant
    deliverables, unless the charge is successfully
    appealed

13
Accreditation, Assessment, and Evaluation
14
Accreditation
  • ABET (formerly the accreditation board for
    engineering and technology)
  • Made up of representatives from various technical
    societies (e.g., ASCE, ASEE, ASME)
  • ABET accredits degree programs (not departments),
    primarily at the undergraduate level
  • ABET normally visits on a 6-year cyclethe next
    general visit to MSU is in fall 2016!
  • used to be that ABET was of concern every now and
    thennow, generally continuous (check for the
    ABET person in your department

15
AssessmentEvaluation
  • There are different levels of assessment and
    evaluation
  • in the context of accreditation and general
    program review.
  • in the context of evaluating faculty for
    advancement.
  • They are (or should be) related!

16
AssessmentEvaluation
  • Faculty and programs/departments continually
    monitor the delivery of the program and
    achievements of its students and alumni.
  • Program Educational Objectives (PEOs)broad
    longer-term goals of the program
  • Program Outcomesmore specific goals achieved by
    the time of graduation
  • Course Learning Objectives (CLOs)what is to be
    learned in a specific course

17
AssessmentEvaluation
  • Example of PEOs
  • The Departmentprovides opportunities to obtain
    the knowledge, skills, and professional
    perspective needed for
  • advancement in civil or environmental engineering
    practice and the pursuit of advanced studies
  • life-long learning
  • professional practice consistent with the
    principles of sustainable development

18
AssessmentEvaluation
  • Example of program outcomeslargely defined by
    ABET and a relevant technical society. Not an
    exhaustive list, but includes things like
  • apply knowledge of math, science, and engineering
  • design system, component, or process with
    realistic constraints
  • knowledge of contemporary issues

19
AssessmentEvaluation
  • Example of course learning objectives (CLOs)
    from intro to civil engineering (not exhaustive)
  • measure and compute horizontal and vertical
    distances
  • explain the difference between engineering
    analysis and design in the context of defining
    and solving ill-posed problems
  • describe basic principles of sustainability
    (e.g., carbon footprint, green design, LEED
    certification)

20
AssessmentEvaluation
  • Various departments do assessment and/or
    evaluation differently!
  • Achievement of CLOs and/or program outcomes is
    tracked using evidence from class (e.g.,
    achievement on exams, homework assignments, term
    papers).
  • Shortcomings (e.g., a CLO is not being covered or
    covered adequately) are highlighted and remedied.

21
AssessmentEvaluation
  • Teaching effectiveness and quality are also
    assessed on an ongoing basis
  • Student Instructional Rating System
    (SIRS)students anonymously provide feedback at
    end of semester
  • e.g., rate the instructor on the following scale
  • (0.0 ? 4.0)
  • currently used in annual reviews, tenure and
    promotion deliberations
  • HOLD ON TO YOUR SIRS FORMS!

22
AssessmentEvaluation
  • Student Opinion of Courses and Teaching (SOCT)
  • overall, was the instructor effective?
  • summary statistics made available on-line to all
    for each instructor by courseNOT used in TP or
    annual reviews
  • department-based assessments of
    teachingmethod/extent varies by department

23
Tips and Tricks how to survive, succeed,
facilitate learning, and inspire
24
Tips and Tricks Preparing a class
  • We all want to be remembered as the professor who
    made a major impact on students lives and was an
    inspiration
  • How we do that is a mixture of the mundane and
    the unique.

25
Tips and Tricks Preparing a class
  • Syllabus
  • Clear and concise
  • Expectationsyours and theirsbe clear!
  • Means of communicatione-mail, office hours,
    appointmentsbe honest!, then do it!
  • Grading
  • Meeting with TAs

26
Tips and Tricks Delivering a class
  • Freshmen vs. other undergraduates vs. graduate
    studentsthey ARE different!
  • Mutual respect
  • Posting course materials
  • ANGEL www.angel.msu.edu
  • Course web site
  • Others
  • Course presentation
  • Powerpoint issues (death by powerpoint)

27
More Tips, More Tricks
  • Should we call it teaching or learning?
  • Active learning
  • Clickers
  • Forced feedback
  • Heres what I am telling you vs. Tell me what
    you have found

28
More Tips, More Tricks
  • Cooperative learning
  • Assigning groups
  • Group issues
  • You need to figure out what works for you!
  • Can you use humor?
  • Are you a traditionalist?
  • Whatever your approach, you really need to get
    comfortable

29
So, youve been diligent, youve really tried,
and it still goes to hell!
  • Now what?
  • First, be honest in your own assessment of your
    performancedont be defensive!
  • If youre not sure, have someone come into your
    class and give you an honest appraisal.

30
TAKE ACTION!
  • Seek help! Weve all been there at one time or
    another.
  • Talk to your department chairperson
  • Talk to your mentor (and/or get one!)
  • Use formal resources like the Office of Faculty
    and Organizational Development (FOD)
  • Use informal resources like other faculty in your
    department or the college!

31
But, dont do nothing!
  • If all else fails, do what the kids do
  • (googling teaching effectiveness returns 2.3
    million resultssurely theres something there
    that will help the first result is enhancing
    your teaching effectiveness)

32
Resources
  • MSU Registrar
  • www.reg.msu.edu
  • MSU Ombudsman
  • www.msu.edu/unit/ombud
  • MSU Resource Center for Persons with Disabilities
    (RCPD)
  • www.rcpd.msu.edu
  • MSU Counseling Center
  • www.couns.msu.edu
  • Office of Faculty and Organizational Development
    (FOD)
  • www.fod.msu.edu/Mission.asp

33
Resources
  • Engineering Undergraduate Studies
  • www.egr.msu.edu/undergraduate/
  • ASEE
  • www.asee.org
  • Rich Felders website
  • http//www4.ncsu.edu/unity/lockers/users/f/felder/
    public/
  • Watch for other college and university seminars
    and presentations
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