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Museum Entrance

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Welcome to the Museum of Space Race The Beginning U.S. Success U.S. Struggles Decade Goal Artifact 23 Museum Entrance Extra missions Curator s Offices – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Museum Entrance


1
Museum Entrance
Welcome to the Museum of Space Race
Artifact 23
U.S. Struggles
Decade Goal
The Beginning
U.S. Success
Extra missions
Curators Offices
2
Curators Office
Ben Greif
Ben attends Clear Springs High School. He is in
10th grade, and this power point is a project for
World History Pre-Ap.
Contact me at 0001041015_at_students.ccisd.net
Return to Entry
Note Virtual museums were first introduced by
educators at Keith Valley Middle School in
Horsham, Pennsylvania. This template was designed
by Dr. Christy Keeler. View the Educational
Virtual Museums website for more information on
this instructional technique.
3
Room 1
The Beginning Room
Return to Entry
4
Room 2
U.S. Struggle Room
Return to Entry
5
Room 3
The Decade Goal Room
Return to Entry
6
Room 4
U.S. Success Room
Return to Entry
7
Room 5
Extra missions Room
Return to Entry
8
V-2 Rocket
  • Developed by German scientists.
  • It was developed in the second World War
  • This rocket was the first rocket to use a liquid
    propellant.
  • It is considered the ancestor rocket of all space
    rockets.

"V-2 Rocket." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 23
Apr. 2014. Web. 24 Apr. 2014.
Return to Exhibit
9
Sputnik I
  • Launched into orbit on October 4, 1957 by the
    Soviet Union.
  • Its news of reaching space stunned the whole
    world. The fact that they beat the U.S. was even
    more impressive.
  • This small polished metal sphere triggered the
    Space Race.
  • While in space it could be seen from all over the
    world, which scared many Americans.

"Sputnik 1." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 24
Apr. 2014. Web. 24 Apr. 2014.
Return to Exhibit
10
Sputnik 2
  • Sputnik 2 was launched on November 3, 1957 by the
    Soviet Union.
  • It was a 4 meter high cone-shaped capsule.
  • Not only did this rocket go into space, but a dog
    named Laika was able to ride inside of it. She
    was the first mammal in space.
  • Sadly, Laika only survived for about 2 days while
    in space due to thermal problems.
  • Although Soviets were able to launch a mammal
    into space, they didnt a have a plan for
    returning it safely.

http//nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/nmc/spacecraftDisplay.d
o?id1957-002A N.p., n.d. Web
Return to Exhibit
11
Vanguard Rocket
  • In response to the Soviet Unions Sputnik 1 and 2
    The U.S. attempted to launch the Vanguard on
    December 6, 1957.
  • The rocket rose about 4 feet and crashed back
    into the launch pad.
  • Some people called it the flopnik or the
    kaputnik.

"The Space Race and the Cold War." Science and
Its Times. Ed. Neil Schlager and Josh Lauer. Vol.
7. Detroit Gale, 2001. U.S. History in Context.
Web. 24 Apr. 2014.
Return to Exhibit
12
Explorer 1
  • Finally on January 31, 1958, the United States
    launched its first satellite, Explorer I. The
    space race had officially begun.
  • It was the first satellite launched by the U.S.
    into space.
  • The explorer made over 58000 orbits before it
    finally burned up in the atmosphere on March 31,
    1970.
  • They attached a Cosmic Ray Detector to measure
    the amount of radiation in space.

"The Space Race and the Cold War." Science and
Its Times. Ed. Neil Schlager and Josh Lauer. Vol.
7. Detroit Gale, 2001. U.S. History in Context.
Web. 24 Apr. 2014.
Return to Exhibit
13
N.A.S.A.
  • National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
  • Established by president Eisenhower to oversee
    the space program.
  • Became operational on October 1, 1958.
  • Space missions and plans like the Apollo-moon
    landing, Skylab, and the Space Shuttle were later
    led by NASA.

"The Space Race and the Cold War." Science and
Its Times. Ed. Neil Schlager and Josh Lauer. Vol.
7. Detroit Gale, 2001. U.S. History in Context.
Web. 24 Apr. 2014.
Return to Exhibit
14
Pioneer Probes
  • The pioneer probes were the first rockets that
    were used by the U.S. to try and land on the
    moon.
  • Every single one of the rockets were
    unsuccessful.
  • Meanwhile the Soviet Union was getting to
    everything first like the first orbit and moon
    impact. They also took the first pictures, which
    allowed to name most of the moons geological
    features.

"The Space Race and the Cold War." Science and
Its Times. Ed. Neil Schlager and Josh Lauer. Vol.
7. Detroit Gale, 2001. U.S. History in Context.
Web. 24 Apr. 2014.
Return to Exhibit
15
Project Mercury
  • The project began in 1958, with the goals of
    orbiting a manned spacecraft around the Earth.
  • They also wanted to study a mans ability to
    function in space, and be able to recover both
    the man and spacecraft.
  • In this plan they set guidelines for themselves
    like
  • Use simple designs.
  • Use existing technology.
  • Give the pilot altitude control.
  • Be able to separate the crew from the rocket in
    case of failure.

Dunbar, Brian. NASA. NASA, n.d. Web. 24 Apr.
2014.
Return to Exhibit
16
Yuri Gagarin (1934-1968)
  • On April 12, 1961, Yuri Gagarin (1934-1968), a
    Russian cosmonaut, became the first man in space.
  • Yuri Gagarin was one of 19 other pilot enrolled
    in the Russian space program.
  • Yuri Gagarin had to be small in order to fit in
    the space shuttle. He was 52 tall

"The Space Race and the Cold War." Science and
Its Times. Ed. Neil Schlager and Josh Lauer. Vol.
7. Detroit Gale, 2001. U.S. History in Context.
Web. 24 Apr. 2014.
Return to Exhibit
17
Commander Alan Shepard (1923-1998)
  • On May 5, 1961, Commander Alan Shepard
    (1923-1998) of the U.S. Navy became the first
    American in space, orbiting earth in the Mercury
    7 capsule.
  • He later became the fifth person to walk on the
    moon.
  • He also hit two golf balls off of the moon.

"The Space Race and the Cold War." Science and
Its Times. Ed. Neil Schlager and Josh Lauer. Vol.
7. Detroit Gale, 2001. U.S. History in Context.
Web. 24 Apr. 2014.
Return to Exhibit
18
President John F. Kennedy
  • In a speech given on May 25, 1961, Kennedy
    rallied the nation around the space program.
  • In hi famous quote he said, If we are to win the
    battle that is now going on around the world
    between freedom and tyranny, now it is the time
    to take longer strides--time for a great new
    American enterprise--time for this nation to take
    a clearly leading role in space achievement,
    which in many ways may hold the key to our future
    on earth.
  • Then he famously challenged the U.S. with, "I
    believe that this nation should commit itself to
    achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of
    landing a man on the moon and returning him
    safely to earth.

"The Space Race and the Cold War." Science and
Its Times. Ed. Neil Schlager and Josh Lauer. Vol.
7. Detroit Gale, 2001. U.S. History in Context.
Web. 24 Apr. 2014.
Return to Exhibit
19
Gherman Titov
  • He spent more than 25 hours in space, orbiting
    the earth 17 times while in the Vostok 2 capsule
    on August 6, 1961.
  • He was the fourth person in space.
  • His flight proved that people could live and work
    in space.
  • He was the first person to sleep in space and
    develop space sickness.
  • He was also able to take manual photographs using
    a movie camera, that providing the best known
    photographs of Earth at the time.

"The Space Race and the Cold War." Science and
Its Times. Ed. Neil Schlager and Josh Lauer. Vol.
7. Detroit Gale, 2001. U.S. History in Context.
Web. 24 Apr. 2014.
Return to Exhibit
20
John Glenn
  • On February 20, 1962, John Glenn (1921-) became
    the first American in orbit.
  • He went into orbit after Gherman Titov.
  • He was the fifth person to go into space.
  • Later on he went to space in the Space Shuttle.

"The Space Race and the Cold War." Science and
Its Times. Ed. Neil Schlager and Josh Lauer. Vol.
7. Detroit Gale, 2001. U.S. History in Context.
Web. 24 Apr. 2014.
Return to Exhibit
21
Valentina Tereshkova(1937-)
  • The Soviets put the first woman into space in
    1963(Valentina Tereshkova).
  • Before her recruitment to become a cosmonaut
    Valentina was a factory textile worker, but after
    she became a prominent member of the communist
    party.
  • By going into space she dissoluted ideas of women
    being weak politicians in Russia.

"The Space Race and the Cold War." Science and
Its Times. Ed. Neil Schlager and Josh Lauer. Vol.
7. Detroit Gale, 2001. U.S. History in Context.
Web. 24 Apr. 2014.
Return to Exhibit
22
Apollo 11
  • Nail Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin were the first
    humans to land on the moon on July 20 1969, and
    they were from the U.S.. Americans won the space
    race.
  • Neil Armstrong was the first man to step foot on
    the moon.
  • Both astronauts walked on the moon for about 2
    and a half hours. In that time they collected
    about 47.5 lbs. of lunar material to research.
  • Michael Collins, piloted the command spacecraft
    alone in orbit until they returned a day later.

"The Space Race and the Cold War." Science and
Its Times. Ed. Neil Schlager and Josh Lauer. Vol.
7. Detroit Gale, 2001. U.S. History in Context.
Web. 24 Apr. 2014.
Return to Exhibit
23
Salyut Program
  • It was the first space station program undertaken
    by the Soviet Union.
  • It consisted of a 4 crewed scientific space
    stations and two crewed military reconnaissance
    space stations over a period of 15 years.
  • This program was used to find the problems of
    living in space for long periods of time.
  • This space station paved the way to multi-modular
    space stations in the future and set many records.

"The Space Race and the Cold War." Science and
Its Times. Ed. Neil Schlager and Josh Lauer. Vol.
7. Detroit Gale, 2001. U.S. History in Context.
Web. 24 Apr. 2014.
Return to Exhibit
24
Skylab
  • The United States sent up the space station
    Skylab in 1973. It was launched by a modified
    Saturn V rocket.
  • Orbited in space between 1973-1979. It included a
    workshop, a solar observatory, and other systems.
  • During its launch two solar panel arrays were
    broken, which threatened it usability, but in the
    first mission astronauts were able to repair it.
  • Thousands of pictures were taken of Earth, and
    scientists were able to confirm the existence of
    coronal holes(colder areas of the sun found in
    polar regions) in the sun.

"The Space Race and the Cold War." Science and
Its Times. Ed. Neil Schlager and Josh Lauer. Vol.
7. Detroit Gale, 2001. U.S. History in Context.
Web. 24 Apr. 2014.
Return to Exhibit
25
First automatic sampling
  • Luna 16 of the Soviets was the first machine to
    automatically take samples from the moon.
  • Done on September 24, 1970.

"The Space Race and the Cold War." Science and
Its Times. Ed. Neil Schlager and Josh Lauer. Vol.
7. Detroit Gale, 2001. U.S. History in Context.
Web. 24 Apr. 2014.
Return to Exhibit
26
Lunokhod 1
  • Created by the Soviets, Lunokhod 1 was the first
    remote-controlled vehicle on another celestial
    body(moon).
  • This was completed on November 23,1970.

"The Space Race and the Cold War." Science and
Its Times. Ed. Neil Schlager and Josh Lauer. Vol.
7. Detroit Gale, 2001. U.S. History in Context.
Web. 24 Apr. 2014.
Return to Exhibit
27
Uhuru
  • On December 12, 1970 NASA launched the first
    X-ray orbital observatory into space.
  • It was used for the observation of distant stars
    and galaxies.

"The Space Race and the Cold War." Science and
Its Times. Ed. Neil Schlager and Josh Lauer. Vol.
7. Detroit Gale, 2001. U.S. History in Context.
Web. 24 Apr. 2014.
Return to Exhibit
28
Venera 7
  • Conducted the first soft landing on another
    planet(Venus).
  • It also sent the first signals from another
    planet.

"The Space Race and the Cold War." Science and
Its Times. Ed. Neil Schlager and Josh Lauer. Vol.
7. Detroit Gale, 2001. U.S. History in Context.
Web. 24 Apr. 2014.
Return to Exhibit
29
Pioneer 10
  • The first human made object sent on escape
    trajectory away from the sun.
  • This was done in March 3, 1972.

"The Space Race and the Cold War." Science and
Its Times. Ed. Neil Schlager and Josh Lauer. Vol.
7. Detroit Gale, 2001. U.S. History in Context.
Web. 24 Apr. 2014.
Return to Entrance
30
SAS 2
  • First orbital gamma ray observatory.
  • It was sent off into space on November 15,1972.

"The Space Race and the Cold War." Science and
Its Times. Ed. Neil Schlager and Josh Lauer. Vol.
7. Detroit Gale, 2001. U.S. History in Context.
Web. 24 Apr. 2014.
Return to Entrance
31
Some Say Official end of Cold War
  • Some experts consider the official end of the
    space race to be 1975, when the Soviet Soyuz
    craft docked with the American Apollo 18, the
    first-ever international space rendezvous.
  • This meant no further space races were going to
    happen.

"The Space Race and the Cold War." Science and
Its Times. Ed. Neil Schlager and Josh Lauer. Vol.
7. Detroit Gale, 2001. U.S. History in Context.
Web. 24 Apr. 2014.
Return to Exhibit
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