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Chapter 13 Voting and Elections

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Chapter 13 Voting and Elections To Accompany Comprehensive, Alternate, and Texas Editions American Government: Roots and Reform, 10th edition – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Chapter 13 Voting and Elections


1
Chapter 13Voting and Elections
?
To Accompany Comprehensive, Alternate, and Texas
Editions American Government Roots and Reform,
10th edition Karen OConnor and Larry J. Sabato ?
Pearson Education, 2009
2
Voting Behavior
  • Voting is a form of conventional political
    participation.
  • Turnout is the proportion of electorate who
    votes.
  • States regulate voter eligibility.
  • Voters are more educated and make more money.
  • Voters are likely to be middle-aged, women, and
    white.
  • The South traditionally has a lower turnout rate.

3
Why Is Turnout so Low?
  • In 2008, 62 percent of eligible voters turned
    out.
  • Most common reason for not voting is being too
    busy.
  • Registration can also be an unclear process.
  • Absentee voting can be difficult.
  • There are a lot of elections.
  • People are apathetic.
  • Political parties have less influence than in
    earlier years.

4
Ways to Improve Voter Turnout
  • Make registration and absentee voting easier.
  • Make Election Day a holiday.
  • Strengthen political parties.

5
Patterns in Vote Choice
  • Party Democrats largely vote for Democrats.
  • Ticket-splitting has increased.
  • Race minorities largely vote for Democrats.
  • Gender women largely vote for Democrats.
  • Income poor largely vote for Democrats.
  • Ideology liberals largely vote for Democrats.
  • Issues prospective and retrospective judgments.

6
Purposes of Elections
  • Legitimize government, even in authoritarian
    systems.
  • Organize government.
  • Choose issue and policy priorities.
  • Electorate gives winners a mandate.

7
Types of Elections
  • Primary elections can be open or closed.
  • Crossover voting or raiding can occur in open
    primaries.
  • Runoff primaries held if no candidate wins a
    majority.
  • General elections determine who will fill public
    offices.
  • Ballot measures initiative, referendum, and
    recall.

8
Nominating a President
  • Delegates to convention chosen by election or
    caucus.
  • Elections may be winner-take-all or
    proportional.
  • Caucuses are better for the party organization.
  • Elections allow for broader participation.
  • Trend toward front-loading.

9
Party Conventions
  • Each party has its own rules about delegates.
  • Democrats no longer subscribe to unit rule.
  • Delegates tied to candidate, except
    superdelegates.
  • Require representation of women and minorities.
  • Republicans do not bind delegates to candidate.
  • Media extensively cover happenings.

10
Electoral College
  • Representatives from each state who select
    president.
  • Electors equivalent to senators plus
    representatives.
  • Framers favored system to remove power from
    people.
  • Originally president and vice president selected
    alone.
  • Changed after Twelfth Amendment.
  • 1876 and 2000 elections demonstrate concerns.

11
Reforming the Electoral College
  • Three major proposals have been made.
  • Select the president by popular vote.
  • Each congressional district has a vote.
  • Keep the College, abolish the electors.

12
Congressional Elections
  • In Congress, incumbency has its advantages.
  • Support from a paid staff.
  • Media and travel budgets.
  • Scaring off other challengers.
  • Redistricting and gerrymandering to protect
    incumbents.

13
Why Incumbents Lose
  • Redistricting can pit incumbents against one
    another.
  • Scandals.
  • Presidential coattails.
  • Midterm elections presidents party usually
    loses seats.

14
2008 Congressional Elections
  • Democrats advantaged by momentum and money.
  • Used these to make gains in House and Senate.
  • Victories in South and West were particularly
    notable.

15
Reforming the Electoral Process
  • End front-loading with regional primaries.
  • Even the playing field with new campaign finance
    laws.
  • Increase turnout with online voting or voting by
    mail.
  • Make voting more accessible with a modern ballot.

16
AV- Turnout of Eligible Voters
?
Back
17
Figure 13.1- South v. Non-South
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Back
18
Figure 13.2- Why People Dont Vote
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Back
19
Figure 13.3- Registered Voters
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Back
20
Figure 13.4- Front-loading
?
Back
21
Figure 13.5- Electoral College
?
Back
22
Figure 13.6- Gerrymandering
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Back
23
Figure 13.7- Electronic Voting Machines
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Back
24
Table 13.1- Voter Eligibility
?
Back
25
Table 13.2- Women at Conventions
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Back
26
Table 13.3- Congressional Elections
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Back
27
Table 13.4- Election Results
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Back
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