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Six Most Important Tips To Obtain Grant Funding

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Six Most Important Tips To Obtain Grant Funding 1. Gap/Match Match field s gap in knowledge, training, partnering, etc with what your project can do to bridge the gap – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Six Most Important Tips To Obtain Grant Funding


1
Six Most Important Tips To Obtain Grant Funding
  • 1. Gap/Match
  • Match fields gap in knowledge, training,
    partnering, etc with what your project can do to
    bridge the gap
  • Know the literature, current techniques, state of
    your field.

2
Six Most Important Tips To Obtain Grant Funding
  • 2. Internal consistency within your proposal
  • Literature review leads to Aims
  • Aims lead to Hypotheses
  • Hypotheses lead to methods
  • Methods lead to analyses

3
Six Most Important Tips To Obtain Grant Funding
  • 3. Match project idea to the agencys priority
  • Correct branch, agency and program
  • High program relevance
  • Do they target this area for discretionary
    funding?

4
Six Most Important Tips To Obtain Grant Funding
  • 4. Persistence
  • Develop a relationship with the program officer
  • Use email
  • Track them down at conferences
  • Obtain PILOT DATA to show you can do the project

5
Six Most Important Tips To Obtain Grant Funding
  • 5. Match made in heaven doesnt exist
  • Take criticism to heart
  • Good ideas will get funded, not poor science from
    known researchers/universities/pretty faces
  • Get feedback and clarify, revise, justify and/or
    add consultants, literature, data, measures

6
Six Most Important Tips To Obtain Grant Funding
  • 6. Buy a Ticket
  • Must apply
  • Best way to get a grant is to write a proposal

7
Barriers to Success(another list)
  • 1. "Trust me, I'm the expert
  • 2. Give me the money, then Ill design my
    project
  • 3. I'm going to develop a scale
  • 4. Camouflaging the real intention of the
    proposal

8
Barriers To Success(another list)
  • 4. "Is this a problem?" "Is this important?
  • Wheres the beef?
  • 5. Inappropriate tests or measures
  • 6. Avoiding input from others

9
Why Bother Writing A Proposal?
  • Interest and/or ambition
  • A researchable problem or need exists
  • Resources are needed
  • Plan can be developed
  • Environment will support the project
  • Professional stature
  • Material gains
  • Liabilities are less than benefits

10
Proposal Fundamentals
  • Major steps in proposal writing
  • Commonalities Across Agencies

11
Major steps in proposal writing
  • - Abstract
  • - Project Description or Narrative
  • - Preliminary Studies / Results
  • - Procedures / Methodology
  • - Evaluation Plan
  • - Dissemination Plan

12
Major steps in proposal writing
  • - Facilities and Equipment
  • - Personnel
  • - Budget and budget justification
  • - Special Agency Requirements
  • - Appendices / Attachments
  • - References
  • - Title

13
The Abstract
  • Lays out the project
  • The proposal builds from the abstract
  • Watch number of words/amount of space
  • Abstract must be consistent with the proposal -
    write this section last

14
Abstract
  • Include
  • Problem, issue or need to be addressed
  • Statement of the significance
  • Listing of the objectives or goals
  • Brief summary of the method and expected outcomes

15
Project Description The MAJOR Section
  • Introduction
  • Summary of what is proposed and why?
  • Define the Who, What, Why, Where, When, and How

16
Project Description The MAJOR Section
  • Text should address
  • Theoretical framework and rationale
  • Goals, objectives, or aims
  • Current status of the field
  • The innovation or improvement proposed by the
    project

17
Project Description The MAJOR Section
  • Significance --
  • Why do this?
  • What will it do the field?
  • How will it be better?

18
Project Description
  • Establishes
  • importance of problem or issue
  • parameters limitations
  • credibility and competence of the principal
    investigator
  • novelty of the approach
  • "Why?" for giving PI the money

19
Preliminary Studies / Results
  • Include for all proposals --
  • Pilot data and preliminary work is essential for
    showing that the design will work
  • Include tables and graphs if necessary

20
Procedures / Methods
  • Include design, participants, procedures
  • Aim by aim, experiment by experiment, tasks by
    task
  • Be VERY specific
  • Provide DETAILS
  • only routine tests, assessments, procedures may
    be noted without details

21
Methods/Procedures
  • Include statistical analyses, if appropriate
  • Link hypotheses to specific analyses
  • Have escape options if your hypotheses NOT
    supported
  • Project time line must show how parts fit
    together
  • Future studies or long range implications

22
Evaluation
  • Measures of success for the project design
  • Specifics on various evaluation or testing models

23
Dissemination Plan
  • How to communicate results why?
  • NSF looks at
  • Spread - large dissemination
  • Choice - alternative products or procedures
  • Exchange - sharing information
  • Implementation - use of new processes or
    procedures

24
Facilities and Equipment
  • What do you have already?
  • Describe research space, equipment, materials
    available
  • Describe laboratory specific general University
    facilities
  • Make this description consistent with budget
    request

25
Personnel
  • Establish the credibility of the PI other
    personnel
  • Publications
  • Prior work
  • Pilot data work

26
Personnel
  • Get connected with others though
  • Conferences, seminars, professional meetings
  • Correspondence, phone calls, lab visits
  • Reviewers of manuscripts or grant proposals
    (these are public knowledge)

27
Personnel
  • Include updated vita or biological sketch in
    proposal
  • Check all entries - include most recent / most
    relevant to fit page limits
  • Length content guidelines
  • Be accurate, DO NOT inflate

28
Personnel
  • What if key personnel are inexperienced or
    lacking in credentials?
  • How do we get a grant if we havent had a grant?

29
Budget and Budget Justification
  • Review budget elements justification carefully
  • What do you need for the project?
  • What is needed for the life of the project?
  • Be realistic and as accurate as possible
  • Carefully justify any unusual items

30
Special Agency Requirements
  • Partnerships
  • Compliances
  • Plans for continuation after grant ends
  • Other / Pending Support (related work)
  • Reviewers to /or reviewers not to include
  • Matching Funds
  • Countries eligible to apply

31
References
  • List all references cited in text
  • Be accurate in spelling, citations
  • Be complete
  • Consider how references are cited in text
  • By author date or by number

32
Appendices/attachments
  • - Letters
  • - Articles and manuscripts
  • - Reviewers discretion
  • - Employ a Table of Contents

33
Title
  • Clear, Concise, Communicative
  • Real World Understanding
  • Golden Fleece Award

34
The Final Step in Proposal Preparation
  • CHECK EVERYTHING CAREFULLY

35
Final Step
  • Proof Reproof-read the entire proposal
  • Check pagination
  • Recheck the budget
  • Recheck agency instructions
  • Obtain required signatures
  • Make perfect copies
  • Mail to meet deadline (postmarked or receipt)

36
Commonalities Across Agencies
  • They are more alike than they are different in
    proposal elements, review process, and in wanting
    to fund the best work

37
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38
Understanding Different Agency Cultures
  • How are reviewers chosen?
  • Where does review take place?
  • How many reviewers?
  • How many proposals?
  • What happens at proposal reviews?
  • How much time is involved for each proposal?
  • What is the role of the program officers?
  • Triage

39
Overview of Reviewer's Pet Peeves
  • Time-wasting hunt for information
  • Unconventional proposal organization
  • Writing to impress, not inform
  • Lack of specificity
  • Hard to read proposals sloppy, dense, boring,
    not scholarly

40
Overview of Reviewer's Pet Peeves
  • Inconsistency
  • Dated materials
  • Excessive support material
  • Over or under ambitious project
  • Budget is not cost effective

41
Visual Appearance
  • Who can read it? Baby Boomers Biggest Lament --
    Presbyopia
  • Layout
  • Use of figures and other graphics

42
Dealing With Rejection
  • - Obtain feedback from program officers
  • - Consider programmatic reasons
  • - Consider proposal issues
  • - Look for missing or confusing elements
  • - ALWAYS Revise Resubmit

43
Rare Possibility
  • Proposal reviewer - inexperienced or poor
    reviewer
  • Be nice -
  • Assertive but not aggressive
  • Inform without lecturing
  • Tone comes through in words

44
Watch Out What You Ask For
  • If it does get funded, you really do have to do
    the work!!

45
QUESTIONS ???
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