Elements%20of%20Fiction%20NCTE%20elements%20of%20fiction%201.%20Plot%202.%20Character%203.%20Conflict%204.%20Theme%205.%20Setting%206.%20Point%20of%20View%207.%20Tone%20and%20Mood - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Elements%20of%20Fiction%20NCTE%20elements%20of%20fiction%201.%20Plot%202.%20Character%203.%20Conflict%204.%20Theme%205.%20Setting%206.%20Point%20of%20View%207.%20Tone%20and%20Mood

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Elements of Fiction NCTE elements of fiction 1. Plot 2. Character 3. Conflict 4. Theme 5. Setting 6. Point of View 7. Tone and Mood Plot: a series of events, or ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Elements%20of%20Fiction%20NCTE%20elements%20of%20fiction%201.%20Plot%202.%20Character%203.%20Conflict%204.%20Theme%205.%20Setting%206.%20Point%20of%20View%207.%20Tone%20and%20Mood


1
Elements of FictionNCTE elements of fiction1.
Plot2. Character3. Conflict4. Theme5.
Setting6. Point of View7. Tone and Mood
2
Plot a series of events, or action, in the
story (what happens in the story)Main plot
vs.Subplot--a second story, or side story, that
is complete and interesting in its own right
3
  • FREYTAGS TRIANGLE

4
  • Freytags Pyramid
  • exposition--gives the background information for
    the story
  • inciting incident--an incident or event which
    begins the central conflict
  • rising action--the central conflict is developed
  • climax--high point of interest, or suspense in
    the story
  • crisis, or turning point--the point of the story
    at which something decisive happens to determine
    the future course of events and the working out
    of the conflict
  • falling action--the events that occur after the
    turning point
  • resolution--the point in the story where the
    central conflict is resolved
  • denouement--tells the final outcome of loose ends
    in the plot

5
  • Character--any person or figure in the story
  • Types
  • main characters
  • Protagonist
  • Antagonist
  • minor characters
  • static vs. dynamic--Does the character stay the
    same during the story or change?
  • round vs. flat--Is the character
    realistic/life-like or unrealistic (a
    caricature)?
  • How is a character revealed? Through
  • her or his appearance or appearance of her or his
    possessions
  • her or his thoughts (omniscient narrator (or
    first person))
  • her or his actions (what she or he does)
  • her or his own words (what she or he says)
  • others words (what others say about her or him)

6
  • Conflict--challenge that lies within the storya.
    types of conflicts 1. individual vs. him-
    or herself (internal conflict)
  • 2. individual vs. individual
  • 3. individual vs. society 4.
    Individual vs. nature 5. individual vs.
    God/Fate/Destiny
  • (external conflicts)

7
  • 4. Theme
  • a central idea that runs throughout the story
  • the message of the story or poem, what the story
    adds up to
  • Motif--a recurring image, symbol, or even event
    that occurs throughout a work of literature

8
  • 5. Setting
  • 1. definition the time and place of the story.
  • 2. examples
  • a. John Steinbecks Of Mice and Men takes place
    on a northern California ranch during the Great
    Depression of the 1930s
  • b. The Catcher in the Rye is set over a
    three-day period in late 1940s New York City.

9
  • 6. Point of View
  • 1. definition the angle from which the story
    is narrated
  • 2. three most common types
  • a. First Person
  • stories told with I as the narrator
  • usually the narrator is the protagonist, but not
    always (Catcher vs. Mockingbird) sometimes the
    narrator is a minor character
  • b. Third Person, Omniscient
  • stories where the narrator uses he and she
    and knows whats in every characters mind
    (omniscient all knowing)
  • most common form of narration (Of Mice and Men)
  • c. Third Person, Limited
  • the narrator cant see whats in the characters
    minds
  • the story is presented through the protagonists
    perspective (Animal Farm)

10
  • 7. Tone and Mood
  • 1. Tone the attitude of the author or narrator
    toward the story or characters (angry, playful,
    satirical)
  • 2. Mood the attitude or emotions of the reader
    toward the story or characters (sad, hopeful,
    nostalgic)
  • 3. Example
  • In The Catcher in the Rye, Holdens tone is
    sarcastic and angry, while Salinger wants the
    readers mood to be a sympathetic feeling and/or
    sadness for Holdens trouble
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