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Title: Select Committee on Education and Recreation


1
Select Committee on Education and Recreation
  • 24 February 2010
  • Dr Mafu S Rakometsi

2
  • WHAT CAN WE LEARN FROM THE NSC RESULTS?
  • WHAT CAN WE LEARN FROM THE NSC RESULTS?
  • Prof. John Volmink - Chairperson of Umalusi

3
  • The Class of 2009
  • Second cohort of candidates to write the new
    National Senior Certificate (NSC)
  • Completely new qualification based on the
    National Curriculum Statement
  • The NSC replaces the Senior Certificate which was
    written at the end of 2007 and which will finally
    be phased out in 2011
  • Some 552 073 sat for the NSC (620 192 enrolled
    including repeater candidates)
  • Approximately 60,25 of all those who have
    written have met the requirements of a pass

4
Comparing the NSC with that of previous years
  • The NSC differs from the previous Senior
    Certificate both in structure as well as in
    grading
  • A critical feature of the Senior Certificate was
    that what determined a pass or fail was based on
    the aggregate score
  • The NSC determines a pass or fail by 40 in at
    least three subjects and 30 in three others
  • Not completely appropriate to compare overall
    results between the two qualifications

5
Some criteria for comparison
  • The number of candidates passing
  • The quality of the results
  • The standardisation of the exam
  • The predicative quality of the exam for
    performance at HE level

6
The number of candidates passing
  • Massification is a natural outcome of an
    education system that is non-racist, non-sexist
    and democratic
  • It is the clear that there has been a steady
    increase over the last decade in the number of
    learners who enrolled for and wrote the Senior
    Certificate
  • It is also significant that almost 66 000 of the
    Class of 2009 did not pass because they narrowly
    missed the pass mark in one or two subjects
  • They qualify to write supplementary examinations
    and if half of these candidates pass, the final
    pass mark may go beyond the 67 mark
  • The underlying philosophy of the NCS had been
    designed to ensure that most people achieve the
    minimum requirement for a pass

7
The number of candidates passing Trends in
senior certificate enrolment and passes
Senior Certificate examination results, all
schools, 1994-2009
Year No. of Candidates No. of Candidates Passes Passes
Year Number Change in number () Number Change in passes ()
1995 531 453 7 283 742 -1
1996 518 032 -3 278 958 -2
1997 555 267 7 261 400 -6
1998 552 384 -1 272 488 4
1999 511 159 -7 249 831 -8
2000 489 941 -4 283 294 13
2001 449 371 -8 277 206 -2
2002 471 309 5 324 752 17
Sources DoE, 2004, 2005a, 2005b, 2005c, 2007,
2008, 2009
8
The number of candidates passing Trends in
senior certificate enrolment and passes
Senior Certificate examination results, all
schools, 1994-2009
Year No. of Candidates No. of Candidates Passes Passes
Year Number Change in number () Number Change in passes ()
2002 471 309 5 324 752 17
2003 440 267 -7 322 492 -1
2004 467 985 6 330 717 3
2005 508 363 9 347 184 5
2006 528 525 4 351 503 1
2007 564 775 7 368 217 5
2008 533 561 -6 333 604 -9
2009 552 073 3.5 334718 0.33
Sources DoE, 2004, 2005a, 2005b, 2005c, 2007,
2008, 2009
9
The quality of the results
  • Concerns about quality has become a thorny issue
    and the subject of much debate albeit uninformed
    at most times.
  • SA public uses the matric results as the main
    indicators of quality of the education system and
    so there is an understandable concern about what
    these new results of a new qualification is
    saying about the current state of education
  • It is important however that we interrogate some
    of our assumptions that inform our beliefs about
    standards and quality

10
Assumptions that affect our perceptions Assumption
1
  • The first assumption is that more means less or
    more means worse
  • Stellenbosch University Website
  • In the light of phasing out of matriculation
    exemption and of the distinction between subjects
    on the higher and standard grade, a significant
    number of learners will probably qualify for
    basic admission to university on the basis of
    their subject combination..The implication is
    that many more learners may be able to apply for
    admission to Stellenbosch University. . With
    this background, it becomes clear why it is
    necessary for the University to have its own
    measure to interpret the meaning and value of the
    new NSC and also to generate additional
    information in order to make finer distinctions.

11
Assumption 2 Trustworthiness The standardisation
of the exam
  • Another assumption is that we now use vastly
    different methods of standardising the results
  • Responsibility for matriculation results has
    changed hands
  • JMB (1918 - 1992)
  • SAFCERT (1992 2001)
  • Umalusi (2002 to date)
  • The one constant has been the standardisation
    process used for the examinations.
  • This is crucial to
  • Obtain equivalence of the standard of the SCE
  • Across years, subjects and examination
    authorities
  • It is also necessary in order to deliver a
    relatively constant product to the HE sector and
    to the workplace

12
  • There is an assumption that we are at a much
    worse place today than in 1995

13
Senior Certificate examination results
Senior Certificate examination results, all
schools, 1994-2009
Sources DoE, 2004, 2005a, 2005b, 2005c, 2007,
2008, 2009
14
Umalusis research on comparisons of NSC with
NATED 550
  • Another assumption is that the NCS is of a lower
    standard than the previous curriculum.
  • Research completed by Umalusi into the standard
    of the NCS curriculum confirms that in most cases
    the NCS presents a greater cognitive challenge
  • The NCS also represents modern, updated and more
    demanding versions of previous subjects

15
The NCS philosophy
  • It needs to be said however that the National
    Curriculum Statement represents different sets of
    standards for all
  • Not only does it reflect the new values embedded
    in the Constitution but also aims to develop
    learners who can respond to the growth and
    development of knowledge and technology and the
    demands of the 21st century

16
What is the NCS?
  • Nationally set curriculum
  • Internationally benchmarked
  • Modern and relevant 21st Century skills
  • Reflect the progressive values of the
    constitution
  • Focus on Africa and South Africa

17
The design of the NCS
ASs
leaves of the tree
LOs
branches of the tree
COs and DOs
trunk of the tree
10 FUNDAMENTAL VALUES roots of the tree
CONSTITUTION soil
in which the Fundamental Values are grounded
18
Nine principles of the NCS
  • Social transformation
  • Outcomes-based education
  • High knowledge and skills
  • Integration and applied competence
  • Progression
  • Articulation and portability
  • Human rights, inclusivity, environmental and
    social justice
  • Valuing indigenous knowledge systems
  • Credibility, quality and efficiency

PRINCIPLES nutrients that feed the tree
19
Five critical and seven developmental outcomes
  • Solve problems
  • Work with others
  • Manage self
  • Communicate early
  • Use science and technology
  • Understand world as a set of related systems
  • Strategies to learn
  • Citizenship
  • Cultural and aesthetic sensitivity
  • Education and career opportunities
  • Entrepreneurial opportunities

20
  • Can HE Trust the NSC Results?

21
Senior Certificate examination results and HE
Senior Certificate examination results, all
schools, 1994-2009
Year No. of Candidates Passes Passes University Exemption University Exemption
Year No. of Candidates Number Rate () Number Rate ()
1994 495 408 287 343 58 88 497 18
1995 531 453 283 742 53 78 821 15
1996 518 032 278 958 54 79 768 15
1997 555 267 261 400 47 69 007 12
1998 552 384 272 488 49 69 856 13
1999 511 159 249 831 49 63 725 12
2000 489 941 283 294 58 68 626 14
2001 449 371 277 206 62 67 707 15
2002 471 309 324 752 69 75 048 16
2003 440 267 322 492 73 82 010 19
2004 467 985 330 717 71 85 117 18
Sources DoE, 2004, 2005a, 2005b, 2005c, 2007,
2008, 2009
22
Senior Certificate examination results and HE
Senior Certificate examination results, all
schools, 1994-2009
Year No. of Candidates Passes Passes University Exemption University Exemption
Year No. of Candidates Number Rate () Number Rate ()
2004 467 985 330 717 71 85 117 18
2005 508 363 347 184 68 86 531 17
2006 528 525 351 503 66 85 830 16
2007 564 775 368 217 65 85 454 15
2008 533 561 333 604 63 107 642 20
2009 552 073 334 718 60 109 697 20
Sources DoE, 2004, 2005a, 2005b, 2005c, 2007,
2008, 2009
23
Senior Certificate examination results and HE
Senior Certificate examination results, all
schools, 1994-2009
Year No. of Candidates No. of Candidates University Exemption University Exemption
Year Number Change in number () Number Change in exemptions ()
1995 531 453 7 78 821 -11
1996 518 032 -3 79 768 1
1997 555 267 7 69 007 -13
1998 552 384 -1 69 856 1
1999 511 159 -7 63 725 -9
2000 489 941 -4 68 626 8
2001 449 371 -8 67 707 -1
2002 471 309 5 75 048 11
2003 440 267 -7 82 010 9
Sources DoE, 2004, 2005a, 2005b, 2005c, 2007,
2008, 2009
24
Senior Certificate examination results and HE
Senior Certificate examination results, all
schools, 1994-2009
Year No. of Candidates No. of Candidates University Exemption University Exemption
Year Number Change in number () Number Change in exemptions ()
2003 440 267 -7 82 010 9
2004 467 985 6 85 117 4
2005 508 363 9 86 531 2
2006 528 525 4 85 830 -1
2007 564 775 7 85 454 0
2008 533 561 -6 107 642 26
2009 552 073 4 109 697 2
Sources DoE, 2004, 2005a, 2005b, 2005c, 2007,
2008, 2009
25
Senior Certificate examination results
Senior Certificate examination results, all
schools, 1994-2009
Sources DoE, 2004, 2005a, 2005b, 2005c, 2007,
2008, 2009
26
  • Maintaining Standards Research Project
  • Purpose of the Research
  • To provide Umalusis Assessment and
    Statistics Committee with information on the
    comparability of the old NATED 550 and new
    National Curriculum Statement curricula, and on
    the comparative difficulty of the exams
    associated with each.

27
  • Methodology
  • Comparing curricula
  • In-depth policy analysis of content, skills and
    assessment
  • Design features i.e. outcomes, assessment
    standards, sequencing, progression, etc.
  • Benchmarking NCS exams
  • Comparison NATED 550 HG SG (2005-7) and 2008
    2009 NSC exam papers
  • Analysis of NSC 2009 examination in correlation
    with SAG

28
Subjects Considered in 2008
Subjects Curriculum Evaluation Exam Analysis
English FAL v v
Geography v v
Life Sciences v v
Mathematics v v
Mathematics Literacy v v
Physical Sciences v v
  • Reports are available

29
Subjects Considered in 2009
Subjects Curriculum Evaluation Exam Analysis
English FAL v
Geography v
Life Sciences v
Mathematics v
Mathematics Literacy v
Physical Sciences v
Accounting v v
Business Studies v v
Economics v v
History v v

30
The case of Mathematics
  • This special role of mathematics has seen it
    continuously singled out in discussions on
  • Curriculum reforms
  • Examination results
  • Historically 30 to 40 of secondary schools in
    the country simply did not offer any mathematics
    beyond grade nine
  • In 2009 all 620,000 learners took some form of
    mathematics

31
Mathematics and the Class of 2009
  • The Class of 2009 had 52 866 learners who passed
    mathematics at the 50 level or higher
  • The Class of 2008 had 63 038 learners who passed
    mathematics at the 50 level or higher
  • This stands in contrast to the 25,000 who passed
    Higher Grade mathematics in 2007
  • A further 207 326 learners passed mathematical
    literacy, most of whom would not have done any
    mathematics in the previous system.
  • A total of 8 460 passed ML at the level of 80 or
    higher

32
Math pass rate
Number passing Math at different thresholds
Wrote Passed at 30 Passed at 40 Passed at 50 Passed at 60 Total did not pass
2008 298 821 136 503 89 788 63 038 42 323 162 318
2009 290 630 133 789 85 491 52 866 31 786 156 736
Sources DoE, Abdridged Report on the 2008 NSC
Examniation Results, December 2008 Doe,
Technical Report NSC, December 2008
33
Trends in HG Math pass rate
Number passing HG Math
Year No. Wrote Math in 000s No. Wrote Math HG in 000s No. Passed Math HG in 000s
1995 200,000 60,000 29,000
1996 215,000 65,000 22,000
1997 231,000 68,000 20,000
1998 280,000 60,000 20,000
1999 281,000 50,000 20,000
2000 284,000 39,000 19,000
2001 264,000 35,000 20,000
2002 261,000 35,000 21,000
2003 258,000 36,000 23,000
2004 276,000 40,000 24,000
  • Pass at 50 or higher

Sources Vithal, 2008, Table constructed from
data in CDE Research Report No 13 Kahn 2007, DoE
Senior Certificate Technical Report 2006 DoE
Senior Certificate Report 2007. Figures rounded
off
34
Trends in HG Math pass rate
Number passing HG Math
Year No. Wrote Math in 000s No. Wrote Math HG in 000s No. Passed Math HG in 000s
2004 276,000 40,000 24,000
2005 303,000 44,000 26,000
2006 318,000 47,000 25,000
2007 348,000 46,000 25,000
2008 298,821 n.a. 63,038
2009 290,630 n.a. 52,866
  • Pass at 50 or higher

Sources Vithal, 2008, Table constructed from
data in CDE Research Report No 13 Kahn 2007, DoE
Senior Certificate Technical Report 2006 DoE
Senior Certificate Report 2007. Report on the
National senior Certificate Examination results
2009 Figures rounded off
35
Some remarks about Mathematics and the Class of
2008
  • The cognitive challenge for mathematics for the
    class of 2008 was closer to the old SG level as
    judged by the Umalusi research panel
  • Furthermore there was a mismatch between the
    suggested cognitive demand as provided by the
    SAGs and the cognitive challenge in the exemplars
    and the final mathematics examination
  • Only about 46 of learners met the minimum
    requirements for a pass in mathematics

36
Some remarks about mathematics and the Class of
2009
  • 2009 exam was more challenging than the 2008 exam
  • 2009 aligned to the exam guideline
  • Provided a challenge at the top end
  • Only about 44 of learners met the minimum
    requirements for a pass in mathematics

37
Cognitive demand for HG and SG Mathematics
of marks at each level of cognitive demand on
HG and SG Math papers
2005-7 SG 2005-7 HG 2008 NSC 2009 NSC
Knowledge () 21 10 9 18
Routine procedures () 53 42 62 36
Complex procedure () 20 40 24 35
Problem solving () 7 8 4 11
Sources Draft Composite Exam Analysis Report
Maths, Umalusi Research, 2008
38
The case of Physical Science
  • Curriculum needs urgent attention
  • Content overload
  • Selection of examinable content (especially
    Chemistry)
  • 2009 exam was of a similar standard to 2008
  • Difficult for both top and lower achieving
    learners

39
Physical Science and the Class of 2009
  • The Class of 2009 had 45 452 learners who passed
    Physical Science at the 40 level or higher
  • The Class of 2008 had 62 530 learners who passed
    Physical Science at the 40 level or higher
  • This stands in contrast to the 28 122 who passed
    Higher Grade Physical Science in 2007

40
Physical Science pass rate
Number passing Physical Science at different
thresholds
Wrote Passed at 30 Passed at 40 Passed at 50 Passed at 60 Total did not pass
2008 217 300 119 206 61 480 32 524 16 620 98 042
2009 220 957 81 507 45 531 22 329 10 308 139 450
Sources DoE, Abdridged Report on the 2008 NSC
Examniation Results, December 2008 Doe,
Technical Report NSC, December 2008
41
Trends in HG Physical Science pass rate
Number passing HG Physical Science
Year No. Wrote Phys. Sc in 000s No. Wrote Phys. Sc in 000s No. Passed Phys.Sc HG in 000s
2006 69,302 29,781
2007 71,172 28,122
2008 217,300 n.a. 32,524
2009 220,957 n.a. 22,329
  • Pass at 50 or higher

Sources Vithal, 2008, Table constructed from
data in CDE Research Report No 13 Kahn 2007, DoE
Senior Certificate Technical Report 2006 DoE
Senior Certificate Report 2007. Report on the
National senior Certificate Examination results
2009 Figures rounded off
42
Cognitive demand for HG and SG Physical Science
of marks at each level of cognitive demand on
HG and SG Physical Science papers
2005-7 SG 2005-7 HG 2008 NSC 2009 NSC
Factual () 21 12 12 15
Conceptual () 29 30 38 39
Problem Solving () 50 58 50 46
Sources Draft Composite Exam Analysis Report
Maths, Umalusi Research, 2008
43
Results of other Critical Subjects
  • Life Sciences
  • 2009 exam was more difficult for below-average
    candidates, but not so challenging for
    above-average candidates
  • Accounting
  • curriculum
  • NCS content more than Nated 550 content
  • Examination guidelines cover 40 -50 of new
    disciplines
  • 2009 exam was of a similar standard to 2008
  • difficult for both top and lower achieving
    learners

44
  • Quality Assurance of the 2009 National Senior
    Certificate Examination
  • Dr Mafu S Rakometsi CEO of Umalusi

45
2009 Quality assurance processes
  • Moderation of the question papers
  • Moderation of Site-Based Assessment (SBA)
  • Monitoring of the conduct of the NSC examination
  • Verification of marking and
  • Standardization of marks.

46
Scope of the quality assurance processes
  • Number of NSC 2009 question papers moderated

Number of subjects Number of papers Approved/ Conditionally approved at 1st moderation Approved/ Conditionally approved at 2nd moderation Approved/ Conditionally approved at 3rd moderation
38 130 44 73 13
47
Scope of the quality assurance processes
  • Moderation of SBA

Subjects Provinces Provinces Provinces Provinces Provinces Provinces Provinces Provinces Provinces
EC FS GP KZN Limp MP NW NC WC
Accounting v v v v
Business Studies v v v
Economics v v v
English First Additional Lang v v v
Geography v v v
History v v v v
Life Sciences v v v v
Life Orientation v v v v v v v v v
Mathematics v v v
Mathematical Literacy v v v
Physical Science v v v
48
Scope of the quality assurance processes
  • Monitoring of the NSC examination writing phase

Province No of exam centres No of candidates enrolled No of exam centers monitored by Umalusi No of Umalusi monitors per province No of exam centers monitored by Umalusi staff
EC 908 76 242 17 04 01
FS 314 31 412 17 04 01
GP 787 109 535 14 02 01
KZN 1 670 132 931 29 04 01
Limp 134 101 658 30 04 01
MP 528 58 759 34 04 01
NC 135 11 461 14 02 01
NW 382 32 420 22 03 01
WC 416 48 198 12 03 01
Total 5 272 602 616 169 30 09
49
Scope of the quality assurance processes
  • Monitoring of the NSC examination marking

Province No of marking centres No of marking centers visited by Umalusi monitors No of marking centers visited by Umalusi staff
EC 14 05 01
FS 15 06 01
GP 07 02 01
KZN 31 08 01
Limp 19 08 01
MP 16 08 01
NC 03 03 01
NW 14 03 -
WC 02 02 -
Total 121 45 07
50
Scope of the quality assurance processes
  • Moderation of marking
  • Memoranda discussion meetings
  • Approved and signed off finalized memoranda/
    marking guidelines for all the NSC subjects
  • Centralised moderation (see next slide)

51
Scope of the quality assurance processes
  • Centralized moderation of marking

Non language subjects Language subjects
Accounting Afrikaans First Additional Language P1, P2, P3
Agricultural Science P1, P2, P3 English First Additional Language P1, P2, P3
Business Studies IsiXhosa Home Language P1, P2, P3
Economics Sesotho Home Language P1, P2, P3
Geography P1, P2 Setswana Home Language P1, P2, P3
History P1, P2
Life Sciences P1, P2
Mathematics P1, P2, P3
Mathematical Literacy P1, P2
Physical Science P1, P2
52
Areas of good practice
  • Generally papers catered for both the weaker
    high performing candidates,
  • In many cases the Nov 2009 March 2010 were
    presented at the same time for moderation, this
    ensured comparability of standard,
  • External moderators signed the final papers off
    before dispatch to provinces for printing,
  • Great improvement observed in the monitoring of
    exams by provinces,
  • Security measures were intensified in the
    majority of centers across provinces,

53
Areas of concern
  • Moderation of SBA
  • Majority of provinces do not conduct actual
    moderation of SBA tasks learner portfolios
    moderation exercise is limited to a compliance
    audit.
  • Majority of the SBA tasks reflect over reliance
    on past examination papers, educators lack
    creativity in developing suitable tasks,
  • SBA tasks developed by educators focus mainly on
    assessing the lower cognitive skills,
  • Educators battle with the development use of
    rubrics used for scoring learners,

54
Areas of concern
  • Implementation Assessment of Life Orientation
    (LO) requires serious attention. LO is 100
    internally assessed and standards vary from one
    province to the other, and even within provinces.
  • Monitoring of exams
  • Incidents of improper registration of candidates
    resulted in duplications and some candidates not
    registered or registered for the incorrect
    subjects,
  • The appointment of suitable trained Invigilators
    and Chief Invigilators is essential. This will
    address problems relating to the flouting of even
    basic examination regulations.
  • The security systems in Mpumalanga during the
    printing, distribution, and storage of question
    papers require urgent attention.
  •  

55
Areas of concern
  • Criteria for the appointment of markers should be
    strictly adhered to so as not to disadvantage
    candidates.
  • Moderation of marking
  • Memoranda discussion meetings for small subjects
    did not receive the same attention as that given
    to the gateway subjects. These memorandum
    discussions were poorly attended. Added to this
    was the absence of input from the provinces.
  • The problems with the improper translation of
    question papers into Afrikaans is still of great
    concern.

56
Areas of concern
  • Additions were made to the final memoranda
    without the consent of the DoBE and Umalusi. A
    few incidents of non-adherence to the final
    memoranda were observed, (pg 37, 38 of the NSC
    report).
  • Some markers do not have the ability and
    experience to handle higher-order cognitive level
    questions that required insight and logical
    reasoning.
  • There were instances of inaccurate totaling of
    marks and incorrect transferring of marks to the
    cover page during marking.

57
Areas of concern
  • Standardization of marks
  • Data on the raw mark distribution for 2008 did
    not correspond with data contained in the 2009
    standardization booklets. The number of
    candidates reflected in the pairs analysis was
    also not accurate.
  • The data sets submitted for verification of the
    resulting process was incomplete and sometimes
    not in accordance with the Umalusi
    specifications. This resulted in a delay of the
    verification process.
  • Poor learner performance especially in
    Mathematics, Physical Science Accounting point
    to problems with the curriculum as well as
    teaching and learning.

58
Recommendations
  • Moderation of SBA
  • Moderation of the standard of SBA must be
    implemented at the school and cluster levels.
    Checks for compliance can still be part of the
    moderation process to ensure adherence to policy.
  • All the assessment bodies should ensure that all
    educators are familiar with the policy
    requirements to ensure the meeting of national
    standards.
  • Monitoring of exams
  • The appointment of suitably trained Chief
    Invigilators is essential. This will address
    problems relating to the flouting of even basic
    examination regulations.

59
Recommendations
  • Verification of marking
  • Criteria for the appointment of markers should be
    strictly adhered to so as not to disadvantage
    candidates.
  • Standardization of marks
  • Data submitted for standardisation purposes must
    be accurate and in the specified format.

60
Recommendations
  • There is a need to establish a basis for the
    standardization of Life Orientation (LO). Umalusi
    recommends that an externally-written component
    be introduced for LO with a view to set standards
    for the assessment of this subject.
  • There is an urgent need for very intensive
    teacher training focusing on the content of the
    new Accounting curriculum. This must then
    translate into the effective teaching, learning,
    and assessment of the subject.
  • The Physical Science curriculum appears to be
    challenging in terms of breadth and needs to be
    reviewed.
  • Teaching and Learning of Mathematics needs to be
    strengthened

61
Examination Irregularities
  • The majority of irregularities were of a
    technical nature and these were reported to
    Umalusi in terms of established processes.
  • Some irregularities were as a result of
    registration-related problems, eg candidates not
    appearing on mark sheets, some registered for
    incorrect subjects.
  • Major irregularities
  • Leakage of the 5 papers in Mpumalanga
    Mathematics P1 2, Physical Science P1 2 and
    Accounting. These were reported to Umalusi in
    October 2009. Back-up papers were moderated under
    tremendous time pressure.

62
Examination Irregularities
  • On 20 December 2009, Umalusi was informed that
    the DoE investigations revealed that other papers
    may have been compromised in Mpumalanga.
  • An official report from the DoE was sent to
    Umalusi on 29 Dec.
  • Umalusi EXCO constituted on 30 Dec and agreed
    that the matter be investigated further.
  • Based on the information in the DoE report,
    Umalusi decided not to approve the release of
    Mpumalanga results at its approval meeting of 04
    Jan 2010.

63
Examination irregularities
  • The Assessment Standards Committee of Umalusi was
    tasked to do a thorough verification of the
    Mpumalanga results between 04 and 06 Jan 2010.
  • Method used
  • comparison of the average performance of schools
    in 2009 with their average performance in 2008
    per subject and based on their raw marks scored
    in both years.
  • the Standard deviations of these raw marks were
    also compared as well as the difference between
    the raw examination mean the raw SBA mean
    between 2008 2009. Small positive differences
    in these means from 2008 to 2009 would mean that
    there were positive interventions. Significant
    (high) differences would indicate that there were
    possible irregularities.

64
Examination irregularities
  • The investigation showed that most of the
    differences were negative, indicating that there
    was a downward trend in the performance of
    candidates in Mpumalanga.
  • Based on the investigation, the Assessment
    Standards Committee concluded that their was no
    indication of any patterns to suggest systemic
    inflation of results.
  • Umalusi EXCO presented the Umalusi findings to
    the Minister on the 6th January 2010.
  • Based on this Umalusi Council took a decision to
    approve release of Mpumalanga results.

65
Conclusion
  • The findings of the quality assurance processes
    are a clear indication of a maturing system that
    has, on the one hand, made positive strides
    towards improvement in certain areas of
    assessment and examination, but, on the other
    hand, still has a few challenges that need to be
    addressed.
  • The quality assurance of each of these processes
    presented above was conducted based on Umalusi
    criteria. Umalusi uses criteria that are
    subjected to constant review and refinement, to
    ensure that they are in line with current trends
    in assessment and examinations.

66
Conclusion
  • As a final quality assurance measure, Umalusi
    moderated the final marks awarded to the
    candidates. This is done through a rigorous
    standardization process carried out in line with
    established principles and procedures. Through
    this process, Umalusi ensures the consistency of
    the NSC examination over time and across the
    provinces.
  • Apart from the statistical inputs presented,
    Umalusi considered qualitative inputs, as well as
    very sound educational reasoning to arrive at the
    2009 standardization decisions. Umalusi is proud
    to indicate that in the main, the candidates raw
    marks were accepted. There were very few
    instances where it was necessary to perform minor
    adjustments to the candidates raw marks.

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Conclusion
  • In general Umalusi is pleased with the manner in
    which the 2009 NSC examination was administered.
  • Umalusi acknowledges that a number of technical
    irregularities were reported, but these were
    addressed in a fitting manner.
  • The few serious irregularities reported were also
    afforded proper investigation and resolution to
    ensure that the credibility of the 2009 NSC
    examination is maintained.
  • Umalusi takes this opportunity to express
    appreciation to the national provincial
    departments of education for their concerted
    effort in ensuring a credible examination.
  • Umalusi expresses appreciation also to all the
    relevant stakeholders for the necessary support
    given in line with Umalusi quality assurance
    initiatives.

68
  • Thank you!
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