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Academic Vocabulary

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Academic Vocabulary & the Common Core (Am I Doing this Right? ) Erie I BOCES November 21, 2013 Facilitator: Mary Jo Casilio – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Academic Vocabulary


1
Academic Vocabulary the Common Core (Am I
Doing this Right? )
  • Erie I BOCES
  • November 21, 2013
  • Facilitator Mary Jo Casilio

2
Power of Words
  • Test your word knowledge

3
Rhetoric is language at play language plus. It
is what persuades cajoles, inspires and
bamboozles, thrills and misdirects. It causes
criminals to be convicted, and then frees those
criminals on appeal. It causes governments to
rise and fall, best men to be ever shunned by
their best friends brides, and perfectly
sensible adults to march with steady purpose
toward machine guns. Sam Leith, Words Like
Loaded Pistols
4
But
  • . we cant do any of this without words
  • without vocabulary

5
What are the categories for the Anchor Standards
in Language?
Reading Writing Speaking/Listening Language
Key Ideas and Details Text Types and Purposes Comprehension and Collaboration Conventions of Standard English
Craft and Structure Production and Distribution of Writing Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas Knowledge of Language
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas Research to Build and Present Knowledge Vocabulary Acquisition and Use
Range of Reading Level of Text Complexity Range of Writing
6
Shifts in ELA/Literacy
Shift 1 Balancing Informational Literary Text Students read a true balance of informational and literary texts.
Shift 2 Knowledge in the Disciplines Students build knowledge about the world (domains/ content areas) through TEXT rather than the teacher or activities
Shift 3 Staircase of Complexity Students read the central, grade appropriate text around which instruction is centered. Teachers are patient, create more time and space and support in the curriculum for close reading.
Shift 4 Text-based Answers Students engage in rich and rigorous evidence based conversations about text.
Shift 5 Writing from Sources Writing emphasizes use of evidence from sources to inform or make an argument.
Shift 6 Academic Vocabulary Students constantly build the transferable vocabulary they need to access grade level complex texts. This can be done effectively by spiraling like content in increasingly complex texts.
7
Why are we here?
  • Yes, the Common Core the Shifts
  • Yes, the NYS Assessments
  • But also.

8
Objectives / Overarching Questions
  • What is meant by academic vocabulary?
  • Why is direct vocab instruction so significant?
  • How do we choose the right words?
  • What would a research-tested process(es) look
    like in action?

9
So where might we begin?
  • How do children gain words?
  • How can teachers help? Remediate?
  • How is SED guiding?

10
Language begins at Home Correlations SES,
Talk, Vocab IQ Source Adapted from Hart
Risley, 1996
Professional Families Working Families Welfare Families
Parent Utterances / Hour 487 301 176
Childs Recorded Vocabulary Size 1,116 749 525
IQ Score at Age 3 117 107 79
11
The Word Gap SED, Talk, Vocab IQ Source
Adapted from Hart Risley, 1996
Professional Families Working Families Welfare Families
Parent Utterances / 4 years 45 million words 26 million words 13 million words
12
Connection Oral Written
  • Beginning reading instruction is typically
    accomplished by teaching children a set of rules
    to decode printed words to speech. If the words
    are present in the childs oral vocabulary,
    comprehension should occur as the child decodes
    and monitors the oral representations.
  • HOWEVER, if the print vocab is more complex than
    the childs oral vocab, comprehension will NOT
    occur. Kamil Heibert, 2005

13
Thus uneven growth rates By end of second
grade Source Biemiller Slonim research
Lowest Vocabulary Quartile of Students Highest Vocab Quartile of Students
Root Word Acquisition 1.5 root words / day 3 root words / day
Total Word Bank 4,000 root word meanings 8,000 root word meanings
14
The Matthew Effect The rich get richer
  • Because poor readers tend to read less than
    better readers, the gap between good and poor
    readers in absolute number of words read becomes
    progressively greater as the child advances
    through school Children who are good readers
    become better readers because they read more and
    also more challenging texts, but poor readers get
    relatively worse because they read less and less
    challenging texts. Stahl, 1999

15
Turn Talk
  • What do these trends tell us?

16
Can direct vocabulary instruction help? (As
cited in Marzanos Vocab for the Common Core)
Meta-Analysis Focus Effect Size Percentile Gain
Haystead Marzano, 2009 Effects of building vocab on academic achievement .51 19
Elleman, Lindo, Morpho, Compton, 2009 Effects of vocab instruction on comprehension .50 for words taught directly 19
17
What are the characteristics of effective
direct vocab instruction? (Isabel Beck
colleagues)
  • Frequent exposure to words
  • Encounters in multiple texts (emphasized in CCLS
    materials, modules)
  • Active processing of the words

18
Defining the Shift / Direct Instruction in
Practice
  • Shift 6

19
So Tier II Academic Vocab but which words?
  • Importance utility
  • Instructional potential
  • Conceptual understanding
  • . Easier said than done!
  • Lets try it!
  • Beck sample

20
What Not to Teach (Beck)
  • No formula for picking words
  • Must be able to explain the meaning of the words
    with known terms
  • Must be useful, i.e. student must be able to
    find a way to use this word in everyday life

21
Marzanos Six Step Process (see handouts)
  1. Teacher provides definition
  2. Student re-states in own words (in writing)
  3. Student creates non-linguistic representation
  4. Student engages in activities with words
  5. Student discuss words
  6. Students participate in word play

22
Frayer Model
Definition
Characteristics
Concept
Examples
Non-Examples
23
Sample Modified Frayer Model
Jo Robinson How to Get More Out of Your Core
Reading Program
24
(No Transcript)
25
Identifying Similarities and Differences
Analogies A is to B as C is to D A B C D


is to
Relationship_____________________________________
__


as
is to
Analogies A is to B as C is to D A B C D


is to
Relationship_____________________________________
__


as
is to
26
Identifying Similarities and Differences
Analogies A is to B as C is to D A B C D
Benevolent

Good
is to
Relationship_first is more nuanced, implies tad
more________________________
Malevolent
Bad
as
is to
Analogies A is to B as C is to D A B C D


is to
Relationship_____________________________________
__


as
is to
27
Semantic Feature Analysis
28
(No Transcript)
29
Word Walls / Root Words (ELA eg spec)
30
Generative Sentences
  • Given a word and conditions about the placement
    of the word, write a sentence.
  • Forces attention to grammar, word meaning, and
    academic language

31
Volcanoes in the 4th Position
32
Volcanoes in the 4th Position
33
Volcanoes in the 4th Position
34
Lets try it 7 word sentence that begins with
I believe and has volcanoes in the 7th
position
35
7 word sentence that begins with I believe and
has volcanoes in the 7th position
  • I believe that there are many volcanoes.
  • I believe gases erupt from shield volcanoes.

36
Lets try it . . . .
  • Write/say a 7 (or greater) word sentence that
    begins with The text states and uses the word
    volcanoes.
  • Write/say a 9 (or greater) word sentence that
    uses Contrary as the first word, has a comma,
    and uses the word volcanoes.
  • Write/say a 13 (or greater) word sentence that
    begins with Despite the fact that, has a comma,
    and uses the word volcanoes.

37
(No Transcript)
38
Oral Language Inside/Outside Circles
  • Class is divided (some students face out, some
    students face in).
  • Teacher asks a question, students think of an
    answer.
  • Outside circle shares with partner first.
  • Inside circle shares.
  • Teacher monitors.
  • Outside circle moves to the right ONE person and
    the process is repeated.
  • Post SENTENCE FRAMES
  • Think SPEED DATING!

39
Sentence Framing
  • Do you agree that_______________________?
  • Why or why not?
  • I do/do not agree that _________ because
    _______________ .
  • Even though _____________ , I think ___________
    .

40
  • How do you get students to use school language in
    your classroom?
  • Since _____________ , effective teachers
    ___________________ .
  • Contrary to _______________ , I believe that
    __________________ .

41
More Sentence Framing (They Say, I Say Graff)
  • In discussions of ____________________, a
    controversial issue is whether to ____________.
  • While some argue that ______________, others
    contend that _________________.
  • Of course, some object that _______________.
    Although I concede that _______________, I still
    maintain that ________________________.

42
But so many words What about indirect
instruction? Wide Reading?? Thematic building?
43
But so many words What about indirect
instruction? Wide Reading?? Thematic building?
  • Yes!
  • Marilyn Jager Adams Advancing Our Students
    Language Literacy, The Challenge of Complex
    Texts

44
Introducing Vocab / Building Thematically
45
Additional Resources
  • EngageNY.org
  • Questions?
  • Feel free to contact me
  • Mary Jo Casilio
  • mcasilio_at_e1b.org
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