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Addressing the Downward Prospective Student Market Trends for Engineering Majors: UMR

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... Grow to 6500-7000 Students TOTAL Enrollment 5400 Undergraduate Students 4100 Graduate Students 1300 Freshman class ... process, but with a little ... 10th ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Addressing the Downward Prospective Student Market Trends for Engineering Majors: UMR


1
Addressing the Downward Prospective Student
Market Trends for Engineering Majors UMRs New
Pipeline
  • A Strategy for Growing Engineering Enrollments of
    Women and Underrepresented Students
  • Cecilia Elmore, Womens Leadership Institute
  • Jay Goff, Enrollment Management
  • Marcus Huggans, PH.D., Student Diversity Programs
  • University of Missouri-Rolla
  • www.umr.edu

2
Overview
  • Quick introduction to UMR
  • Student Market Data focused on Women and
    Underrepresented Students
  • How UMR has Responded to Embrace an Aggressive
    Strategic Plan for Campus Wide Diversity

3
Program Deliverables
  • Current, National Student Market Data for
    Engineering Fields
  • A Review of Recruitment Data Tools and Reports
  • An Enrollment Model Position for Expanding
    Diversity Programs in Light of Shrinking Budgets
  • Ideas for Regular Program Assessment

4
Rolla, Missouri In the Middle of Everywhere
  • Population 17,000
  • South-Central Missouri
  • 95 miles to St. Louis
  • 100 miles to Springfield
  • 90 miles to Columbia
  • 35 miles to Ft. Leonard Wood
  • Top 100 U.S. Small Towns
  • Not Overly Diverse
  • White persons 93.2
  • African American 1.5
  • American Indian and Alaska Native 0.6
  • Asian-American 2.4
  • Not reported 2.3

5
History
  • Founded in 1870 as the University of Missouri
    School of Mines and Metallurgy
  • The first technological institution west of the
    Mississippi River and one of the first in the
    nation.
  • Became the University of Missouri-Rolla in 1964
  • curricula expanded to encompass the full range of
    engineering and scientific subjects BS, MS,
    Ph.D.
  • Grew to include 18 engineering degrees
  • 2001 UM Board of Curators approved a new school
    of management and information systems

6
EnrollmentSTRATEGIC PLAN GOAL Grow to 6500-7000
Students
  • TOTAL Enrollment 5400
  • Undergraduate Students 4100
  • Graduate Students 1300
  • Freshman class 900
  • 2003, 2004 Largest New Student Classes in 15
    years
  • Class Locations
  • Campus 91
  • Distance 9

7
UMR's Academic Major Distribution by Headcount
8
Enrollment Trend
New Enrollment Management Plan initiated in 2001
9
Undergraduate Demographics
  • Average Age 21.6 years old
  • Gender
  • 23 Female
  • 77 Male
  • First Generation College Students
  • 2004-05 39
  • Residency
  • Missouri Residents 76
  • Out-State Students 24
  • Ethnicity
  • African-American 4
  • Asian-American 3
  • Caucasian 83
  • Hispanic 2
  • Native-American 1

10
On-Campus EnrollmentBy Gender
11
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12
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13
Current Student Success
  • Retention Rates, 2004
  • General Student Body 85
  • Female Students 90
  • Minority Students 91
  • CAMPUS GOAL 87
  • Graduation Rates, 2004
  • General Student Body 63
  • Female Students 69
  • Minority Students 71
  • CAMPUS GOAL 70

14
Student Market Data
15
Projected Change in High School
Graduates 2002-2012
9
-17
-11
-20
-4
-10
7
-10
11
-6
-11
4
-2
-22
-2
-1
-3
-8
0
-7
53
-3
10
3
5
7
5
4
-7
3
12
6
-6
-4
3
-10
13
8
20
-8
2
-1
-3
2
16
-1
-12
7
9
9
gt 20 11 to 20 0 to 10 Decreases
-10
16
Additional Need to Focus on Diversity Pipeline
Markets
SOURCE U.S. Department of Education, National
Center for Education Statistics, State Public
Elementary and Secondary Enrollment Model, and
State Public High School Graduates Model. May
2002.
17
ACT Policy Report, May 2003
18
ACT Social Policy, May 2003 Maintaining a Strong
Engineering Workforce Report
  • Study and comprehensive policy report examining
    twelve-year trends and including over 750,000 ACT
    test takers.
  • "The future of engineering in the U.S. may be in
    jeopardy," said Richard J. Noeth, director of
    ACT's Office of Policy Research and a co-author
    of the study. "We don't have the numbers of
    prospective students, and many of those students
    aren't prepared. The science of engineering
    impacts many important aspects of our day-to-day
    lives... so these findings should not be taken
    lightly.
  • The future of diversity in U.S. engineering is
    also in question. Not only have fewer students
    expressed interest in engineering careers, but
    also fewer females and minorities.
  • "Engineering is a good, high-paying occupation
    which is likely to be growing in the future,"
    Noeth said. "It should be a very attractive and
    popular field of study for today's top high
    school students. Unfortunately, that doesn't
    appear to be the case."
  • "If we want a viable engineering workforce in the
    future, we must work diligently to better prepare
    and recruit more able females and minorities to
    the field so that it better represents our
    changing population.

19
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20
High School Graduates Interested in Engineering
Majors
21
of College Bound Students Selecting an
Engineering Major
22
Female High School Graduates Interested in
Engineering Majors
23
Potential Minority Engineering Majors
24
AIM Using ACT Data to Improve Recruitment
Yield through Predictive Modeling
25
Missouris 2004 Student Funnel for All
Engineering Fields
  • High School Seniors 61,378
  • High School Graduates 57,573
  • ACT Testers/College Bound 42,862
  • Any Engineering Interest, all scores 1,599
  • Engineering Interest, 21 comp. score 1,102
  • (21 MO average score / 50)
  • Engineering Interest, 24 comp. score 807
  • (24 UM minimum for auto admission)
  • UMRs Freshmen Engineering Majors 520
  • from Missouri

26
Missouris 2004 Female Student Funnel for
Engineering
  • High School Seniors 30,332
  • High School Graduates 26,692
  • ACT Testers/College Bound 23,571
  • Any Engineering Interest, all scores 236
  • Engineering Interest, 21 comp. score 182
  • (21 MO average score / 50)
  • Engineering Interest, 24 comp. score 138
  • (24 UM minimum for admission)

27
Missouris 2004 African-American Student Funnel
for Engineering
  • High School Seniors 8561
  • High School Graduates 7536
  • ACT Testers/College Bound 3850
  • Any Engineering Interest, all scores 167
  • Engin. Interest, 21 comp. score 36
  • (21 MO average score / 50)
  • Engin. Interest, 24 comp. score 15
  • (24 UM minimum for auto admission)

28
Understanding Psychographic Data Lifestyles of
Female Engineering Students
  • Lifestyle Segmentation SystemPRIZM is the most
    widely used neighborhood target marketing system
    in the United States. Claritas founded the U.S.
    geodemographic industry when it launched the
    first PRIZM segmentation system in 1974.
  • UMR students studied Claritas reports which
    categorized current and prospective female
    students by PRIZM segments to attempt to develop
    an interest segmented marketing approach.
  • http//www.clusterbigip1.claritas.com

29
PRIZM segments
  • Consumer segmentation and targeting systems used
    to classify U.S. households
  • Based on demographic, socioeconomic, housing, and
    consumer demand data
  • Groups of people with similar common interests,
    behaviors, and purchasing patterns at similar
    points in their lives
  • Also called Clusters
  • There are 60 different cluster groups in
    existence among the women of UMR.
  • The majority of women at UMR fall into 11 major
    clusters.

30
Top UMR Female PRIZM Segments
  1. (20) Fast-Track Families Landed Gentry
  2. (33) Big Sky Families Country Comfort
  3. (51) Shotguns Pickups Middle America
  4. (37) Mayberry-ville Country Comfort
  5. (13) Upward Bound 2nd City Society
  6. (5) Country Squires Landed Gentry

31
Summary of Female Prospects
  • Demographics
  • Mostly white, with some Asian and American Indian
  • Come from a variety of class families (36,165 to
    80,044)
  • Predominantly from suburban or rural areas.
  • Psychographics
  • Enjoy variety of activities, ranging from hunting
    and fishing to country club sports to staying
    home watching TV.
  • Buy a lot of electronics and sporting equipment.

32
Best Communication Topics to Reach the
Prospective Female Tech Students
  • Technology
  • Sports
  • Outdoors
  • Reading

33
Results from 2003-04University Wide Diversity
Initiative Student Diversity Programs
Womens Leadership Institute Center for
Pre-College ProgramsTaking One 30 year-old
Program and Expanding it to Three
34
Strategic Plan Enrollment Goals
  • GOALS Enrollment Diversity
  • Overall Enrollment of 6000 (5500 on campus, 500
    off campus programs)
  • New Student Goals
  • 900 students first-time freshmen
  • 425 transfer students
  • 425 graduate students
  • total of 1750 new students overall

35
GOAL for Diversity Initiative
  • Create a University-wide recruitment and support
    system to further increase the number of
    under-represented minority and female students
    attending and graduating from UMR.
  • The new program will work to preserve and learn
    from the successful elements developed in UMRs
    long-standing MEP model.
  • Ultimately the new programs will coordinate with
    other campus units to match or exceed the
    enrollment and retention goals defined in UMRs
    Strategic Enrollment Plan and provide support for
    students in all UMR majors.

36
University Wide Student Diversity
InitiativeFocus Points
37
New Diversity Initiative Structure
38
Programming Focuses
  • Market Specific Recruitment Plans
  • Retention Academic Support Plans
  • Student Organizations
  • Scholarships Fundraising
  • Mentoring Advising
  • Summer Camps Workshops
  • Student Resource Areas

39
Student Diversity Programs Mission Statement
Goals
  • The SDPs mission is to identify, enroll, and
    develop talented under-represented students, and
    prepare them for corporate and community
    leadership. The SDP provides a number of
    activities and programs for students to learn how
    to obtain academic and professional success. Its
    goals encourage student involvement and strategic
    leadership in campus and community organizations
    through involvement.
  • Objective Create a more diverse culture at
    UMR.
  • Goal 1 (Recruitment/Enrollment) Increase
    enrollment of underrepresented students at UMR to
    10 of Total Undergraduate Student Population by
    2010.
  • Goal 2 (Fundraising) Develop and execute
    strategies to raise scholarship funding and
    endowments as to provide
  • Goal 3 (Retention) Provide appropriate Academic
    Personal Support Systems that enhance student
    success. This activities should Develop a
    culture that compels students to return,
    contribute, and mentor. (7 Week Bridge and
    Master Student)
  • Goal 4 (Full-Circle) Leverage MEPs graduates
    for mentoring, contributions, leadership, and
    campus involvement.
  • The ultimate goal of the four year program is to
    enable more students to be ready to persist
    through the rigors of academia and equip them
    with the necessary leadership skills to
    immediately be an asset to corporations and the
    community.

40
SDP STRUCTURE
Master Student Program
Outreach, Recruitment Retention
Student Mentors
UMR Student Diversity Programs (SDP)
Scholarships
Special Campus Programs, Speakers, Resources
MEP (Minority Science Engineering Program)
41
SDP Activities
  • Fundraising - Scholarship Fundraising and
    Distribution
  • Retention 7 Week Summer Bridge Program, Master
    Student Classes, 3.0 Banquet, Mentoring/Student
    Academic Counseling, Welcome Back Picnics, etc.
  • Recruitment NSBE PCI,SHPE Se Si Puede,
    Admissions Diversity Showcase/Open House/PRO, 37
    High School visits in St. Louis and Kansas City,
    and Student Professional Conferences (i.e. NSBE,
    SHPE, etc.)
  • Encourage Residential College Learning
    Communities
  • Guest Lecturers Dr. Pamela McCauley-Bell, Mr.
    Kenneth Morgan, etc.
  • Alumni Spotlight/ MEP 30th Anniversary
  • MEP/Student Organizations NSBE, SHPE, SWE
  • Resource Center Alcoa Study Center
  • Corporate Professional Growth Night to Network,
    Professional Society Meeting, etc.

42
MEP WEBSITE
43
SDP WEBSITE
44
Under-represented Student Websites
  • Student Diversity Programs Website
  • http//campus.umr.edu/studiv/
  • Minority Science Engineering Program Website
  • http//campus.umr.edu/mep/
  • Information about Under-represented Minority
    Students Programs and Funding
  • Events Calendar
  • Scholarship Applications
  • Scholarship Criteria

45
A Womens Leadership Institute?
  • Developing an umbrella unit from a
    strengths-based assessment

46
Womens Leadership Institute Mission Statement
Goals
  • The WLIs mission is to serve as an Educational
    and Professional Development Resource Center for
    all UMR Students. The WLI provides a number of
    activities and programs for students to learn
    about leadership from the female perspective.
    Its goals encourage student involvement and
    strategic leadership in campus and community
    organizations.
  • The ultimate goal of the two year program is to
    enable more students to be ready to assume
    leadership and management positions after
    completing their studies at UMR.
  • Goals
  • 1. Increase the number of female first-time
    freshman to 285 for FS2005
  • Increase the female first year retention rate to
    92
  • Increase the 6-year graduation rate to 70 for
    female students
  • Increase the number of students participating in
    the Women As Global Leaders Class and Living
    Learning Community to 90 students

47
Women As Global Leaders Class/ Res College
Outreach, Recruitment Retention
Scholarships
UMR Womens Leadership Institute (WLI)
Speakers Bureau
Special Campus Programs, Mentoring Resources
WISE (Women in Science Engineering)
48
WLI Activities
  • Scholarship Fundraising and Distribution
  • Women as Global Leaders Class
  • Residential College Learning Communities
  • Guest Lecturers
  • Womens Hall of Fame/WISE 30th Anniversary
  • Recruitment Events-EYH, Lock-Ins, Summer
    Programs, Joint events with Admissions and PRO
  • Workshops and joint events with SDP/MEP-Nightto
    Network, Welcome Back Picnic, Graduation
    Receptions, Craft Nights
  • WISE/Student Organizations-SWE
  • Resource Center/Library
  • Mentoring Programs-MentorNet
  • Professional Development-Conferences, workshops

49
Enrollment Progressfor Fall 2005
  • WLI
  • 336 admitted women
  • 142 with enrollment deposits
  • 62 WISE scholarship accepts
  • SDP
  • 104 admitted minority students
  • ?? with enrollment deposits
  • 36 MEP scholarship accepts

50
WLI WEBSITEhttp//wli.umr.edu
51
WISE WEBSITEhttp//wise.umr.edu
52
How Campus Can Help the Diversity Initiative
Prosper
Challenging the Campus Community
  • Support Activities through attendance, internal
    promotion, and encouraging the campus community
    to participate.
  • Serve on the SDP or WLI Campus Advisory Boards
    and Committees
  • Include a diversity component in your research
    and gift proposals that incorporates the SDP
    WLI programming
  • THINK Diversifying UMR is not an overnight
    process, but with a little extra thought and
    effort, we can change the campus for a better
    future.

53
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