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GREEK/ROMAN ALLUSIONS in THE FINANCIER

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GREEK/ROMAN ALLUSIONS in THE FINANCIER&THE TITAN LILIAN Mrs. Semple read a little--not much. She had a habit of sitting and apparently brooding reflectively at ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: GREEK/ROMAN ALLUSIONS in THE FINANCIER


1
GREEK/ROMAN ALLUSIONS in THE FINANCIERTHE TITAN
  • LILIAN
  • Mrs. Semple read a little--not much. She had a
    habit of sitting and apparently brooding
    reflectively at times, but it was not based on
    any deep thought. She had that curious beauty of
    body, though, that made her somewhat like a
    figure on an antique vase, or out of a Greek
    chorus.

2
GREEK/ROMAN ALLUSIONS in THE FINANCIERTHE TITAN
  • AILEEN
  • She paused, looking at him with a straight,
    clear, vigorous glance. He liked the medallion
    sharpness of her features--their smooth, Greek
    modeling.

3
GREEK/ROMAN ALLUSIONS in THE FINANCIERTHE TITAN
  • ANTOINETTE
  • Her head had some of the sharpness of the old
    Greek coinage, and her hair was plaited as in
    ancient cut stone.
  • BERENICE
  • One of her chief delights was to walk alone in
    her room--sometimes at night, the lamp out, the
    moon perhaps faintly illuminating her
    chamber--and to pose and survey her body, and
    dance in some naive, graceful, airy Greek way a
    dance that was singularly free from sex
    consciousness--and yet was it?

4
GREEK/ROMAN ALLUSIONS in THE FINANCIERTHE TITAN
  • For Berenice, also, was a music-rack full
    ofclassic music and song collections, a piano, a
    shelf of favoritebooks, painting-materials,
    various athletic implements, and severaltypes of
    Greek dancing-tunics which she had designed
    herself,including sandals and fillet for her
    hair.

5
GREEK/ROMAN ALLUSIONS in THE FINANCIERTHE TITAN
  • Berenice and Braxmar
  • She paused, perfectly poised, yet quite moved
    really, as charminga figure as one would have
    wished to see--part Greek, partOriental--contempla
    tive, calculating.

6
GREEK/ROMAN ALLUSIONS in THE FINANCIERTHE TITAN
  • PALACE ROMAN/ITALIAN/GREEK TUNES
  • In the new house, on a scaffold one day, a
    famous sculptor and hisassistants were at work on
    a Greek frieze which represented dancingnymphs
    linked together by looped wreaths.

7
GREEK/ROMAN ALLUSIONS in THE FINANCIERTHE TITAN
  • PALACE ROMAN/ITALIAN/GREEK TUNES
  • After the passing of the years neithera modified
    Gothic (such as his Philadelphia house had been),
    nora conventionalized Norman-French, after the
    style of his MichiganAvenue home, seemed suitable
    to him. Only the Italian palaces ofmedieval or
    Renaissance origin which he had seen abroad now
    appealed to him as examples of what a stately
    residence should be.

8
GREEK/ROMAN ALLUSIONS in THE FINANCIERTHE TITAN
  • CELLINI
  • BENVENUTO CELLINI was one of the enigmatic,
    larger-than-life figures of the Italian
    Renaissance a celebrated sculptor, goldsmith,
    author and soldier, but also a hooligan and even
    avenging killer.
  • Much of Cellini's notoriety, and perhaps even
    fame, derives from his memoirs, begun in 1558 and
    abandoned in 1562, which were published
    posthumously under the title The Autobiography of
    Benvenuto Cellini. As noted by one biographer,
    "His amours and hatreds, his passions and
    delights, his love of the sumptuous and the
    exquisite in art, his self-applause and
    self-assertion, make this one of the most
    singular and fascinating books in existence."

9
METHODS
10
OUTERINNER FORCES
11
ROMEO AND JULIET PROLOGUE
  • Two households, both alike in dignity,
  • In fair Verona, where we lay our scene,
  • From ancient grudge break to new mutiny,
  • Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean.
  • From forth the fatal loins of these two foes
  • A pair of star-cross'd lovers take their life
  • Whole misadventured piteous overthrows
  • Do with their death bury their parents' strife.
  • The fearful passage of their death-mark'd love,
  • And the continuance of their parents' rage,
  • Which, but their children's end, nought could
    remove,
  • Is now the two hours' traffic of our stage
  • The which if you with patient ears attend,
  • What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to
    mend.

12
CRITICS ABOUT FATECHANCE
  • the illiterate servant who sought Romeos aid in
    reading names of those invited would never guess
    the connection between his request and the
    catastrophe.

13
CRITICS ABOUT FATECHANCE
  • Mercutio found himself quite by chance in this
    place that was to be fatal to him only an
    unhappy sequence of events causes Tybalt to hit
    to him

14
ROMEO
  • Why, then, O brawling love! O loving hate!
  • O any thing, of nothing first create!
  • O heavy lightness! serious vanity!
  • Mis-shapen chaos of well-seeming forms!
  • Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick
    health! Still-waking sleep, that is not what it
    is! This love feel I, that feel no love in this.

15
ROMEO
  • I fear, too early for my mind misgives
  • Some consequence yet hanging in the stars
  • Shall bitterly begin his fearful date
  • With this night's revels and expire the term
  • Of a despised life closed in my breast
  • By some vile forfeit of untimely death.
  • But He, that hath the steerage of my course,
  • Direct my sail! On, lusty gentlemen.

16
ROMEO
  • A torch for me. Let wantons light of heart
  • Tickle the senseless rushes with their heels,
  • For I am proverbed with a grandsire phrase
  • I'll be a candle holder and look on,
  • The game was ne'er so fair, and I am done.

17
ROMEO
  • Amen, amen! but come what sorrow can,
  • It cannot countervail the exchange of joy
  • That one short minute gives me in her sight
  • Do thou but close our hands with holy words,
  • Then love-devouring death do what he dare
  • It is enough I may but call her mine.

18
FRIAR LAURENCE
  • Virtue itself turns vice, being misapplied
  • And vice sometimes by action dignified.
  • Within the infant rind of this small
    flower Poison hath residence and medicine power
  • For this, being smelt, with that part cheers each
    part Being tasted, slays all senses with the
    heart.
  • Two such opposed kings encamp them still
  • In man as well as herbs, grace and rude will
  • And where the worser is predominant,
  • Full soon the canker death eats up that plant.

19
FRIAR LAURENCE
  • Before Laurence had begun to undertake something,
    he could have approached a predisposition of the
    situation by using some positional/relational
    parameters.(All the parameters are taken from
    SelecteTopics in Indeterministic Systems by
    Aron Katsenelinboigen.)
  • 1 Proximity - remoteness
  • The 'enemies' live in the same city that
    determines the frequency of their conflicts.
    (-10)
  • 2 Permeability
  • The householders did not erect any borders
    between their possessions. They also did not make
    any difference in their clothes in purpose to
    distinguish the 'enemy'. And, of course, they did
    not have on any identification marks leading by
    the same reason. (-10)
  • 3 Compatibility
  • At least, the householders had no religion
    disagreement which was the most important problem
    of incompatibility at those times. (8)
  • 4 Preponderance
  • There are not any urges towards numerical
    superiority and not any struggle of sphere of
    influence in the play. (8)
  • At the same time, no one takes into account the
    prince of Verona's fighting prohibition. The
    people also do not obey their leaders. (-10)

20
FRIAR LAURENCE
  • 5 Traditionalism
  • There are no other explanations about the
    character of the hostility but its
    traditionalism. (-10)
  • 6 Sensitiveness
  • The 'leaders' are 'sensitive' to the quarrels.
    They are involved in to them. (-10)
  • 7 Jumpiness - smoothness
  • The hostility can be characterized by
    'jumpiness'. It is determined by the characters
    which are predisposed to fighting.(-5)
  • 8. Mobility the stationary.
  • The hostility is stationary. (-10)
  • 9. Alternatives
  • All the participants have an alternative not to
    be involved into quarrels. (10)
  • 10. Localization-distribution
  • The 'feud' is spread around Verona. (-10)
  • 11. Specifics
  • The hostility has no specific field. (-10)

21
FRIAR LAURENCE
  • 12. Monopolization
  • Prince of Verona is presented as a person who has
    a power to judge. (10)
  • 13. Diversity - uniformity.
  • There is a little doubt about the only method of
    solving the problem of the hostility. Probably
    for such heroes as Tybald Juliet's marriage would
    not have been an obstacle to proceed fighting.
    (-10)
  • 14. Orderliness - disorderliness.
  • There are no tactics or strategies elaborated by
    the leaders. The hostility goes spontaneously.
    (-10)
  • 15. Reversibility - irreversibility.
  • The hostility has predisposition to be
    reversible. (10)

22
FRIAR LAURENCE
  • In analyzing such parameters friar Laurence could
    have realized that hostility in Verona was
    nothing but an old tradition and may be his task
    was to change the tradition. He had to understand
    the unconditional high value of tradition for
    everybody in order to apply a new peaceful
    tradition to Verona. The hostility was nothing
    else but the situation with dangerous potential.
    If some one was predisposed to fight he could do
    it easily because of the tradition. As we
    remember the heroes given to fighting used any
    trifling occasion to start fighting. Changing of
    the tradition obviously can not entail an
    essential change of the characters but is able to
    shift heroes' behavior.

23
FRIAR LAURENCE
  • Even if he had thought probabilistically, he
    would have referred to prince of Verona as the
    most powerful person who was able to maintain him
    seriously. He was needed to get such a support
    because the marriage could not have relieved all
    the conflicts. It was necessary to make some
    additional arrangements to influence the
    extremely warlike inhabitants. Also Friar
    Laurence could have hidden them even before
    marriage in order not to marry them
    illegitimately and send his messenger to the
    prince. His word as a priests combined with the
    prince's will and power obviously could have lead
    the situation to a happy outcome. They both
    together could have announced a big celebration
    in honor to Romeo and Juliet who could become a
    title of heroes in connection with the new
    tradition.

24
ROMEO AND JULIET
  • Are they predisposed to stay together?

25
ROMEO
  • ROMEO O, she is rich in beauty, only poor,
  • That when she dies with beauty dies her store.
  • BENVOLIO Then she hath sworn that she will still
    live chaste?
  • ROMEO She hath, and in that sparing makes huge
    waste, For beauty starved with her severity
  • Cuts beauty off from all posterity.
  • She is too fair, too wise, wisely too fair,
  • To merit bliss by making me despair
  • She hath forsworn to love, and in that vow
  • Do I live dead that live to tell it now.
  • BENVOLIO Be ruled by me, forget to think of her.
  • ROMEO O, teach me how I should forget to think.

26
DIALOGUE
  • ROMEO To JULIET If I profane with my
    unworthiest hand
  • This holy shrine, the gentle fine is this
  • My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand
  • To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss.
  • JULIET Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too
    much,
  • Which mannerly devotion shows in this
  • For saints have hands that pilgrims' hands do
    touch,
  • And palm to palm is holy palmers' kiss.
  • ROMEO Have not saints lips, and holy palmers too?
  • JULIET Ay, pilgrim, lips that they must use in
    prayer.
  • ROMEO O, then, dear saint, let lips do what hands
    do
  • They pray, grant
    thou, lest faith turn to despair.
  • JULIET Saints do not move, though grant for
    prayers' sake.
  • ROMEO Then move not, while my prayer's effect I
    take.
  • Thus from my lips,
    by yours, my sin is purged.
  • JULIET Then have my lips the sin that they have
    took.

27
DIALOGUE
  • PARIS Come you to make confession to this father?
  • JULIET To answer that, I should confess to you.
  • PARIS Do not deny to him that you love me.
  • JULIET I will confess to you that I love him.
  • PARIS So will ye, I am sure, that you love me.

28
ROMEO AND JULIET
  • What else unites them?
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