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Immigrants%20and%20Urbanization

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Title: Immigrants%20and%20Urbanization


1
Immigrants and Urbanization
http//www.loc.gov/rr/print/list/070_immi.html
  • Sec. 1 The New Immigrants
  • Sec. 2 The Challenges of Urbanization
  • Sec. 3 Politics in the Gilded Age

http//jeopardylabs.com/play/immigrants-and-urbani
zation
http//jeopardylabs.com/play/immigrants-and-urbani
zation-part-2
http//www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/pre
sentationsandactivities/presentations/immigration/
introduction.html
2
The New ImmigrantsSection 1
http//www.loc.gov/rr/print/list/070_immi.html
  • Objectives
  • 1. Identify immigrants countries of origin.
  • 2. Describe the journey immigrants endured and
    their experiences at United States immigration
    stations.
  • 3. Examine the causes and effects of the
    nativists and anti-immigrant sentiments.

3
Through the Golden Door
  • Millions immigrated to the U.S. in the late
    1800s and early 1900s hoping to have a better
    life.
  • Birds of Passage temporary immigrants who came
    to earn money and return home.
  • Most immigrants came to make a new life and
    stayed.

4
Push Factors Pull Factors
Poverty Job Opportunities
Famine Religious Freedom
Land shortages Political Freedom
Religious Persecution Land
Political Persecution
War
Over-population
5
European ImmigrationOld
v. New
  • Countries of Origin before 1890
  • Great Britain
  • Ireland
  • Germany
  • Scandinavia
  • (Northwestern Europe)
  • Countries of Origin after 1890
  • Italy
  • Austria-Hungary
  • Russia
  • (Southern and Eastern Europe)

http//www.ndsu.nodak.edu/instruct/isern/104/new.h
tm
6
Old Immigrants
  • White
  • Anglo Saxon
  • Protestant
  • Similar Language (English / German)
  • Similar Customs

http//library.thinkquest.org/20619/English.html
http//library.thinkquest.org/20619/German.html
7
New Immigrants
  • Darker Skinned / Mediterranean
  • Catholic and Jewish
  • Poorer
  • Many Different Languages
  • Different Customs from each other and from the
    old immigrants

http//library.thinkquest.org/20619/index.html
http//www.loc.gov/rr/print/list/070_immi.html
8
Italian Immigrants
  • Left Italy (mostly southern part) due to economic
    hardships.
  • Many came as birds of passage
  • Catholic population

http//www.loc.gov/rr/print/list/070_immi.html
9
Jews from Russia
  • Left to escape Religious Persecution
  • Pograms organized anti-Semitic campaigns that
    led to the massacre of Jews in the early 1880s
    and early 1900s.

http//library.thinkquest.org/20619/Jewish.html
10
Immigrants from Asia
http//library.thinkquest.org/20619/Chinese.html
  • Chinese came in small numbers in 2nd half of
    1800s
  • California Gold Rush
  • Jobs building the Transcontinental Railroad and
    others
  • After railroads completed they worked in
  • Farming
  • Mining
  • Domestic Workers
  • Motive Economic Opportunity
  • Entry West Coast
  • View One Americans Story from China to
    Chinatown Fong Sees American Dream

http//www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/con
nections/chinese-cal/history.html
11
Anti-Asian Sentiment
  • Mainly affected Chinese and Japanese immigrants
    on the West Coast.
  • Different Language and Customs
  • Looked Different
  • Chinese men wore their hair in a long braid
    (queue), and dressed in a quilted jacket, broad
    cotton pants, and a wide-brimmed hat.
  • Laws passed to restrict Asians rights

http//www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/con
nections/chinese-cal/history.html
12
Discriminatory Laws
  • Couldnt own land
  • Couldnt marry Caucasians
  • Couldnt become citizens
  • Couldnt vote
  • Segregation of schools
  • Chinese Exclusion Act 1882

13
Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882
  • Limited Chinese immigration
  • Was intended to keep out workers that would
    compete against white workers
  • Banned entry of all Chinese except
  • Students
  • Teachers
  • Merchants (Like Fong See)
  • Tourists
  • Government Officials

View Chinese Immigrants _at_ http//www.hippocampus.o
rg/AP20US20History20II
14
Japanese Immigration
  • 1884 Japanese go to Hawaii to work
  • Hawaii becomes U.S. territory 1898
  • Migration to U.S. west coast begins
  • Motive Economic Opportunity
  • Entry West Coast
  • Economic opportunity news spreads by word of
    mouth and Japanese immigration increases

15
Gentlemans Agreement
  • San Francisco, California, school board were
    segregating Asian children
  • Caused Anti-American riots in Japan
  • Theodore Roosevelt negotiated a compromise
  • San Francisco school board withdrew segregation
    order
  • Japan agreed to limited emigration to the U.S.
  • They would no longer issue passports to the U.S.
    and the U.S. would not accept anyone from Japan
    without a passport.

16
Immigration from the West Indies
  • West Indies
  • Jamaica
  • Cuba
  • Puerto Rico
  • Motive Economic opportunity and Poverty in
    the islands
  • Entry Southeast

17
Immigration from Mexico
  • Acquisition of Texas and Mexican lands in the
    Southwest helped many Mexicans become U.S.
    citizens without moving from their homes
  • Motives for others
  • Economic Opportunities
  • Railroads
  • Farm work
  • Fleeing war and political problems in Mexico
  • Entry Southwest

18
A Difficult Journey
http//www.gjenvick.com/CunardLine/VintageBrochure
s/
  • Steamship
  • Atlantic Ocean - 7 to 10 days
  • Pacific Ocean - 3 Weeks
  • Many immigrants traveled in steerage or the cargo
    holds
  • Cramped, dark, dirty, stagnant air,
    louse-infested bunks, few toilets, wide-spread
    disease, barrack-like sleeping quarters

19
Ellis Island Immigration Station
Virtual Tour http//library.thinkquest.org/20619/
Eivirt.html
http//www.ellisisland.org/
  • 1892-1954
  • More than 12 million immigrants passed through
    Ellis Island
  • At Peak 11,000 a day
  • 5 Hours or more to process immigrant
  • New York Harbor
  • Inspection
  • Medical Examination
  • Legal Examination
  • Literacy Test
  • Prove ability to work
  • Have at least 25

http//www.loc.gov/rr/print/list/070_immi.html
Exams http//library.thinkquest.org/5101/exam.htm
To20Markings
20
Watch Ellis Island Videos
  • Watch various video clips about Ellis Island _at_
    http//www.history.com/content/ellis-island
    including the following

Arrival at Ellis Island http//www.history.com/vid
eo.do?nameEllis_Islandbcpid18011351001bclid19
170580001bctid1473707246
Other links http//library.thinkquest.org/5101/ind
ex.htm
21
Angel Island Immigration Station
  • San Francisco Bay
  • Very poor conditions
  • Asians held for months
  • Deportation
  • Why do you think the conditions were more harsh
    than Ellis Island?

Angel Island Ellis Island of the West _at_
http//www.history.com/video.do?nameamericanhisto
rybcpid1676043206bclid1716449937bctid1658436
478
22
Culture Shock
  • Confusion and anxiety resulting from immersion in
    a culture that is very different than your own
  • Some immigrants taken advantage of by con-men,
    pick-pockets, and thieves
  • Had to find place to live, place to work
  • Live in a world and not understand the language
    or customs

View New Immigrants _at_ http//www.hippocampus.org/A
P20US20History20II
23
Dealing with Culture Shock
  • Sought out people like themselves leading to
    development of ETHNIC COMMUNITIES
  • Chinatown
  • Little Italy
  • Shared Language Ethnic newspapers
  • Shared Religion Neighborhood churches and
    synagogues built
  • Shared Cultural Values Social Clubs
  • Aid Societies
  • Orphanages, Old Folks Homes, Cemeteries

24
Problems with Assimilation
  • Immigrants wanted to be American but at the same
    time wanted to retain their own culture.
  • Led to hyphenated Americans
  • Made it difficult to fit into American Society
  • Native-born Americans grew to resent and dislike
    immigrants

Reaction to Immigration _at_ http//www.hippocampus.o
rg/AP20US20History20II
25
Melting Pot or Stewing Pot
  • Melting Pot a mixture of people of different
    cultures and races who blend together by
    abandoning their language and customs to become
    one culture.
  • Stewing Pot a mixture of people of different
    cultures and races who mix together, each adding
    their own flavor and spice to the one culture,
    without giving up all aspects of their home
    culture.

http//regentsprep.org/Regents/ushisgov/themes/imm
igration/theories.htm
26
Nativism
  • The overt favoritism toward native-born
    Americans. Dislike of immigrant groups.
  • Believed in Anglo-Saxon superiority.
  • Viewed new immigrants unfavorably because of
    religion (Catholic, Orthodox or Jewish),
    socioeconomic status, and appearance (ethnicity)
  • American Protective Association Anti-Catholic
  • Colleges, business and social clubs refused to
    admit Jews

http//regentsprep.org/Regents/ushisgov/themes/imm
igration/index.htm
27
Nativism
  • What is the message of this cartoon?
  • Who is the person in the lower right hand corner?
  • Who are the people in the middle section?
  • Who are the people in the back section?

http//library.thinkquest.org/20619/Comics.html
28
The Role of the United States
  • What is the message of this cartoon?

http//library.thinkquest.org/20619/Comics.html
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