ENGINEERING%20ETHICS%20in%203D - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

ENGINEERING%20ETHICS%20in%203D

Description:

ENGINEERING ETHICS in 3D Gene Moriarty Department of Electrical Engineering San Jose State University The Subject Matter of Ethics: Moral Dilemmas A moral dilemma ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:88
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 25
Provided by: GMO101
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: ENGINEERING%20ETHICS%20in%203D


1
ENGINEERING ETHICS in 3D
  • Gene Moriarty
  • Department of Electrical Engineering
  • San Jose State University

2
The Subject Matter of Ethics Moral Dilemmas
  • A moral dilemma may be defined as a conflict a
    person experiences between two or more moral
    obligations in a particular circumstance. Joe
    Herkert

3
List of Typical Engineering Ethics Issues
Involving Conflicts of Obligation
  • 1) conflict of interest
  • 2) public safety and welfare
  • 3) integrity of data representation of it
  • 4) whistle-blowing
  • 5) choice of a job
  • 6) accountability to clients and customers
  • 7) plagiarism
  • 8) trade secrets industrial espionage
  • 9) gift giving bribes
  • 10) fair treatment

4
To these as well as other high-profile ethics
cases we apply
  • De-ontology
  • Utilitarianism
  • Virtue Ethics
  • Etc.

5
  • IEEE Code of Ethics We, the members of the IEEE,
    in recognition of the importance of our
    technologies in affecting the quality of life
    throughout the world, and in accepting a personal
    obligation to our profession, its members and the
    communities we serve, do hereby commit ourselves
    to the highest ethical and professional conduct
    and agree
  • to accept responsibility in making engineering
    decisions consistent with the safety, health and
    welfare of the public, and to disclose promptly
    factors that might endanger the public or the
    environment
  • to avoid real or perceived conflicts of interest
    whenever possible, and to disclose them to
    affected parties when they do exist
  • to be honest and realistic in stating claims or
    estimates based on available data
  • to reject bribery in all its forms
  • to improve the understanding of technology, its
    appropriate application, and potential
    consequences
  • to maintain and improve our technical competence
    and to undertake technological tasks for others
    only if qualified by training or experience, or
    after full disclosure of pertinent limitations
  • to seek, accept, and offer honest criticism of
    technical work, to acknowledge and correct
    errors, and to credit properly the contributions
    of others
  • to treat fairly all persons regardless of such
    factors as race, religion, gender, disability,
    age, or national origin
  • to avoid injuring others, their property,
    reputation, or employment by false or malicious
    action
  • to assist colleagues and co-workers in their
    professional development and to support them in
    following this code of ethics.
  •  
  • Approved by the IEEE Board of Directors August
    1990

6
HISTORY OF CODES OF ETHICS
  • 1803 First code of professional ethics
  • (medical ethics)
  • (Thomas Percival)
  • 1852 ASCE (Civil Engineering)
  • 1880 ASME (Mechanical Engineering)
  • 1884 AIEE (Electrical Engineering)
  • All these Professional Engineering Societies had
    CODES OF ETHICS

7
Engineering is
  • 1) an art
  • 2) a science
  • 3) design
  • 4) a profession
  • 5) a business
  • Engineering is the practice of making good on
    the promise of technology.

8
the project, the endeavor, the enterprise, the
venture
the engineering project
9
Contexts of the engineering project
the human lifeworld
systems
technological systems
the engineering project
10
Ethical Assessment of the Engineering Project
must ultimately take place within the Human
Lifeworld.
the human lifeworld
the engineering project
11
The Human Lifeworld
  • Wherein we pursue GOALS, enact ROLES, and take up
    with THINGS of all sorts
  • Wherein we talk to each other rather than about
    each other.
  • Characterized by a human communication called THE
    CONVERSATION OF THE LIFEWORLD which is IDEALLY
    Mutual / Interdependent / Genuine / Open / Honest
    / Non-Coercive

12
The Micro-view of the Engineering Project
  • The Engineered
  • The Engineer
  • Engineering

the engineering project
13
person / process / product
  • The Engineer Engineers the Engineered.

14
the engineering project
The Engineer
Engineering
Virtue Ethics
Conceptual Ethics
PROCESS
PERSON
The Engineered
Material Ethics
PRODUCT
15
Three Types of Ethics
  • VIRTUE ETHICS
  • Care/objectivity/honesty
  • CONCEPTUAL ETHICS
  • Social Justice/Environmental Sustainability/Healt
    h Safety
  • MATERIAL ETHICS
  • Engagement/Enlivenment/Resonance

16
  • ORIGINS
  • VE ---- Stems from being-toward/being-with/being
    -for
  • CE ---- Stems from health, safety, welfare
    phrase in CODES of ethics
  • ME ---- Stems from interactions of
    product/end-user/world

17
MATERIAL ETHICS
PRODUCT
RESONANCE
ENGAGEMENT
ENLIVENMENT
END-USER
WORLD
18
Within the Conversation of the Lifeworld the
values of resonance / engagement / enlivenment
are discussed. For example, can such and such
a product be engaging to the end-user? If so,
how so? If not, why not?
19
THREE LEVELS OF ADJUDICATION
  • VIRTUE ETHICS corporate level
  • CONCEPTUAL ETHICS professional level
  • MATERIAL ETHICS social level

20
THE ETHICS ENGINE
21
Over-all Ethical Assessment of the Engineering
Project
  • Integrates all three kinds of ethics.
  • Can use as point of departure the over-all value
    function
  • J a Jv ß Jc ? Jm
  • where a ß ? 1
  • and we assume all Js range from -3 to 3.

22
Sub-Value-Functions
  • J a Jv ß Jc ? Jm where
  • a ß ? 1
  • and the sub-value-functions are
  • Jv av Jv1 ßv Jv2 ?v Jv3 av ßv
    ?v 1
  • Jc ac Jc1 ßc Jc2 ?c Jc3 ac ßc
    ?c 1
  • Jm am Jm1 ßm Jm2 ?m Jm3 am ßm
    ?m 1

23
EXAMPLE RFID Design
  • Virtue Ethics company ombudsman assesses the
    team effort as caring/honest/fair so we set Jv
    3.
  • Conceptual Ethics professional ethics committee
    decides that environment is not compromised but
    social justice can be and health safety is fine
    so we set Jc 1.
  • Material Ethics conversation of the lifeworld
    decides there is no resonance of product with
    world, end-user in her world is not enlivened,
    and end-user not engaged with product so we set
    Jm -3 ---- with equal weightings we get
    over-all J 0.333 (not so good, etc)

24
  • What would be the major consequence of
    complementing theoretical and practical ethics
    with real ethics? It would be the realization
    that we make our crucial decisions not as
    individuals, as consumers, taxpayers, and voters
    who navigate their course in preestablished and
    rigid channels, but as citizens, and not just
    citizens who pass on matters of civil rights and
    social welfare, but as citizens who take
    responsibility for the large design of our
    culture and either make it hospitable to
    commanding reality or continue to thicken its
    suffocating overlay of disposable
    reality. --- Albert Borgmann
About PowerShow.com