Chicken Soup for the Teenage Soul - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Chicken Soup for the Teenage Soul PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 72541f-MTY5Z



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Chicken Soup for the Teenage Soul

Description:

Title: Chicken Soup for the Teenage Soul Author: Paulding Last modified by: SCCPS Created Date: 10/22/2012 11:49:53 AM Document presentation format – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:72
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 99
Provided by: Pauld221
Learn more at: http://mrsjeninebryan.weebly.com
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Chicken Soup for the Teenage Soul


1
(No Transcript)
2
E.Q. What inspires me?
  • What is an epigraph?
  • a relevant quotation at the beginning of a book
    or chapter
  • Read each epigraph.
  • Rewrite it in your own words to demonstrate that
    you understand the main point.
  • Decide if you agree or disagree with it. Does it
    inspire you or does it confuse you? Explain.
  • The Introduction
  • How to Read This Book
  • jumping around
  • poetry, prose, fiction, non-fiction

3
  • Vocabulary
  • raggedy
  • profession
  • brilliance
  • shadowing
  • consolation
  • astonished
  • content
  • mediocrity
  • vulnerable
  • spontaneous

4
  • Written Response
  • Select one quote that inspires you.
  • Write a paragraph explaining what it means to you
    and why you like it.

5
E.Q. How do authors use main ideas and
supporting details to develop a storys theme?
  • Have you ever been disappointed by your birthday?
  • Write a paragraph describing a birthday that was
    a disappointment.
  • Write another paragraph about a birthday that was
    fantastic!
  • Eleven by Sandra Cisneros
  • As you read, think about the theme of the story.

6
  • Applying Theme to a Thinking Map
  • Complete a Brace Map that allows you to extract
    the theme of the story.

7
  • Writing Response Eleven
  • Choose two of the response choices below to
    complete in your sourcebook.
  • Do you agree with Rachels idea that, no matter
    how old we are, we always have all the ages we
    have been inside of us? Why or why not?
  • If you were Mrs. Price, how would you have
    handled the situation with Rachel?
  • Why do you think Phyllis Lopez at first didnt
    say the sweater was hers?
  • How does Cisneros make us understand how Rachel
    feels? Give examples from the story of
    descriptions and language that helped you
    understand Rachels feelings.

8
  • Writing Response Eleven
  • Choose one of the response choices below to
    complete in your sourcebook.
  • If you were Rachel, what would you have done? To
    answer this, write a dialogue between Rachel and
    Mrs. Price. Begin your dialogue with
  • Mrs. Price Of course the sweaters yours. I
    remember you wearing it once.
  • (Continue the dialogue any way you want.)
  • What sense do you have of Rachel from reading
    this story? Write a description of Rachel how
    she looks, what shes like as a person, what her
    family is like, what she wants to do in the
    future based on the information in the story
    and your imagination.

9
E.Q. How do I select important details from
texts to help me compare them?
  • Describe your favorite teacher of all time.
  • Use a Bubble Map
  • Include as many adjectives as you can to describe
    this teacher.

10
  • Mrs. Virginia DeView, Where are You?
  • Read this selection on page 157.
  • Compare the teachers in this story and in
    Eleven.
  • Create a Double Bubble Thinking Map to compare
    the two teachers.
  • Which teacher would you rather have? Why?

11
  • Writing Response
  • What are the qualities of an ideal teacher?
  • Describe this teacher.
  • Make sure to be realistic, practical, and
    logical.
  • Write your response in your sourcebook.

12
eyes to read and look at the teacher
brain for thinking
  • Writing Response
  • What are the qualities of an ideal teacher?
  • Describe this teacher.
  • Make sure to be realistic, practical, and
    logical.
  • Write your response in your sourcebook.
  • Then draw a diagram of the ideal teacher. Make
    sure to label the elements.

ears to hear
heart for caring
mouth to share ideas
The Perfect Student
hands for opening books
hands for writing
feet for moving toward success
13
E.Q. How do I determine the authors purpose
and use that purpose to compare texts?
  • What kind of character are you?
  • Make a list of character traits that would be
    used to describe you.
  • Write a paragraph describing yourself.
  • Sparky page 179
  • As you read, think about the authors purpose.
  • What is the author trying to tell us?
  • Write a sentence identifying the authors
    purpose.
  • List three (3) details from the story that
    supports your purpose.
  • http//www.youtube.com/watch?vGsSXMT0NrB4NR1f
    eaturefvwp

14
  • Written Response Comparing Traits
  • Compare the traits of Sparky with those of
    Charlie Brown.
  • Read Zuri at Bat.
  • How would you compare Charlie Brown and the
    football to Zuri at Bat.
  • Who do you relate to more?
  • Write an argumentative paragraph to support your
    opinion on the authors purpose.
  • Write your response in your sourcebook.

15
  • Written Response Comparing Traits
  • Compare the traits of Sparky with those of
    Charlie Brown.
  • Read Zuri at Bat.
  • How would you compare Charlie Brown and the
    football to Zuri at Bat.
  • Who do you relate to more?
  • Write an argumentative paragraph to support your
    opinion on the authors purpose.
  • Write your response in your sourcebook.
  • Now create a comic strip for Zuri at Bat.

16
E.Q. How do I craft a personal essay in
response to what I have read?
  • Choose any three selections to read on your own.
  • List the titles and page numbers for these
    selections in your sourcebook.
  • Choose the selection that had the greatest impact
    on you.
  • How do you relate to this selection?
  • What does this selection mean to you?
  • What does it make you think about?
  • What did you learn?
  • Write a multi-paragraph response in your
    sourcebook.

B O N U S
17
E.Q. How do I use the main idea of the text to
form the basis of analysis?
  • Describe a time when you got in trouble or upset
    your parents or guardian and learned from your
    mistake?
  • Write about this experience in your sourcebook.

18
  • Read these selections.
  • While reading, complete this chart.
  • Egg Lessons page 146
  • The Cost of Gratefulness page 150
  • Unconditional Mom page 70

Story What does the teen do wrong? How does his or her parent react? What did the teen learn? What can readers learn?
Egg Lessons
The Cost of Gratefulness
Unconditional Mom
19
  • Written Response Essay
  • Compare the teen protagonists in the three
    stories. Tell how they are alike and how they are
    different.
  • Determine which teen learned the most valuable
    life lesson and which parent did the best job
    teaching a lesson. (The teen and parent do not
    have to come from the same story.)
  • Write this essay in your sourcebook.
  • Remember, essays need an introduction, a body,
    and a conclusion.

20
E.Q. What are the causes and effects of
bullying?
  • How can you prevent bullying?
  • Write an answer in your sourcebook.
  • Focus on actions!
  • Reading Selections
  • The Gossiper page 36
  • A Simple Christmas Card page 38

21
  • Vocabulary Homework Due 11-2-12
  • gossip
  • rumor
  • sage
  • interfered
  • occasional
  • sincerely
  • claim
  • counterpoint
  • coherent
  • transitions

22
  • Written Response
  • Write about a time when you or a friend were hurt
    by gossip or bullying.
  • Make sure to include the outcome what happened.
  • Write an alternative outcome either positive or
    negative. What might have happened if the
    situation would have been handled differently.

23
  • Written Response
  • Write about a time when you or a friend were hurt
    by gossip or bullying.
  • Make sure to include the outcome what happened.
  • Write an alternative outcome either positive or
    negative. What might have happened if the
    situation would have been handled differently.
  • Write a letter to a student who is being bullied.
    Give advice on how they should handle this. Make
    suggestions for what they should do.
  • Write these responses in your sourcebook.

24
E.Q. How can I read a writing prompt closely to
fully understand my topic?
  • Reading Questions
  • How do you feel about this book?
  • Who would you recommend this book to?
  • Who would you say should read this book?
  • How can I organize my ideas before writing?
  • List some choices that you can use for
    pre-writing.
  • In your sourcebook, list and explain at least
    three (3) different strategies that you could use
    for prewriting.
  • Tell which strategy works best for you and why.

25
  • Use the RAFT strategy to analyze the assessment
    prompt.

R A F T
ROLE AUDIENCE FORMAT TONE
What is your job as a writer? What is the purpose of this essay? Who are you speaking to? What vocabulary does this audience expect to hear? What does the audience already know, and what do they need to know about your topic? What structural elements are required in this essay? What is the appropriate attitude for you to have as the writer? How do you feel about your topic, and how can you communicate that to your audience?

26
  • Analyze the Writing Assessment.
  • Does this Chicken Soup truly soothe the soul?
  • This is to be an argumentative (persuasive)
    essay.
  • In the introduction, the claim is made that This
    is a book you never finish. This phrase has two
    possible meanings. It could mean that you will
    love the book so much that you will read it over
    and over again. However, it could also mean that
    you will hate it so much, you will quit reading
    it.
  • Based on what you have read so far, which opinion
    of the book do you hold?
  • Use evidence from the book (quotes, summaries of
    stories, explanations of cartoons, etc.), write
    an argument to defend your opinion on the book
    and to convince your audience to love or hate
    this book.
  • Make sure to use at least five words from your
    vocabulary lists in your essay.

27
  • Plan the Writing Assessment.
  • Use a Tree Map to Plan for Writing

Your Claim
Second Point
Third Point
Counterpoint
First Point
Ideas Evidence Supporting Details
Ideas Evidence Supporting Details
Ideas Evidence Supporting Details
Ideas Evidence Supporting Details
  • Share your plan with your partner. Give each
    other feedback.

28
E.Q. How can a writing plan make writing a
rough draft easier?
  • Parts of an Essay
  • What are the basic parts of an essay?
  • Which part of your writing plan will you use to
    create which part of your essay?
  • What is a thesis statement?
  • Writing Topic Sentences
  • Each paragraph in an essay needs a topic sentence
    matched with supporting details.

29
  • Don't Touch That Towel!
  • By Shannon C.
  • I think our school would benefit by investing in
    automatic motion-sensing hand dryers. I have
    several reasons for this. Children can get sick
    from the germ-infested paper towel dispensers we
    now have. There is also terrible waste when
    students continuously pull the lever, dispensing
    towels they don't really need.
  • First of all, this automatic hand dryer is very
    sanitary. Instead of pulling on a lever that has
    been touched by a large number of students, users
    can just stick their hands under the blow-dryer.
    No germs can get on them because there is nothing
    to touch.
  • In addition, if we buy this automatic hand
    dryer, we can save the school budget and trees.
    The money we save by not wasting paper towels can
    be used for educational things, such as field
    trips. We could even go to a tree farm and see
    how many trees we saved. Cutting fewer trees will
    make a big difference in the environment.
  • If the electricity happens to go out, the hand
    dryer, like all electric appliances, will go out
    too. That is ONE bad thing, but we know the
    lights don't go out that often. We will store
    extra paper towels in the custodian's room for
    emergencies.
  • So I think there is much to be said for this
    automatic motion-sensing hand dryer.
    Administrators will be glad to know that
    absenteeism will be lowered. Money can be saved.
    Finally, if the trees could talk, they would
    probably shout for joy, knowing that a whole
    school is saving a forest. Let's install
    automatic hand dryers at our school as soon as
    possible.

30
  • Writing Time The Rough Draft
  • Write your essay one paragraph at a time.
  • Make sure to follow your writing plan.
  • Allow your partner to read your paragraphs,
    compare them to your writing plan, and give you
    feedback.

31
E.Q. How can I use transitions to make my
writing more coherent?
  • Transitional Words
  • Using transitional words and phrases helps papers
    read more smoothly, and at the same time allows
    the reader to flow more smoothly from one point
    to the next.
  • Transitions enhance logical organization and
    understandability and improve the connections
    between thoughts.
  • They indicate relations, whether within a
    sentence, paragraph, or paper.
  • Place the word list in your sourcebook and refer
    to this list as you write your essay.

32
  • Writing Time Revising Editing
  • Make changes to your rough draft to include
    transitional words and phrases.
  • Make changes to make sure you have included all
    the required elements.
  • Use your writing plan as a check-list.
  • Have your partner re-read your essay to give you
    feedback on the changes you have made.

33
  • Editing
  • Check your essay for errors in spelling,
    punctuation, capitalization, and grammar.
  • Final Drafts
  • Make sure to follow the format rules for your
    final draft.
  • Final Drafts are DUE MONDAY!

34
E.Q. How do authors use contradictions in their
writing and what does it reveal about their
purpose?
  • Family Home
  • Using your own words, write a definition for each
    word.
  • Write these entries in your source book.

35
  • Vocabulary Homework Due 11-9-12
  • hallowed
  • enchanted
  • wretched
  • vengeance
  • pompous
  • linger
  • flounces
  • luminous
  • indignant
  • finale

36
  • Pre-Reading Discussion
  • Look at the quote on page 61. Do you agree or
    disagree?
  • If you had to describe your family as an animal,
    which one would it be and why?
  • Contradiction
  • Which part of the quote contains a contradiction?
  • Give other examples of situations that you may
    want to escape from but at the same time you wish
    to remain inlike family.

37
  • My Childhood Home I See Again
  • http//showcase.netins.net/web/creative/lincoln/sp
    eeches/poetry.htm
  • Look for contradictions and annotate this poem.
  • Complete Part I, discuss your annotations with
    your partner.
  • What contradictions did you find?
  • Now read Part II. Discuss those annotations you
    made in Part II as well.

38
  • Contradictions
  • Sadness Pleasure
  • Earth Paradise
  • Vile Pure
  • Living in the Tombs
  • Written Response
  • What is Lincoln experiencing emotionally?
  • What does he say is more dreadful than death?
  • Is Matthew a contradiction?
  • Write a response explaining how Lincoln
    personifies death and answer each of these
    questions.

39
E.Q. How do poets use imagery to engage the
reader?
  • What is Imagery?
  • Using your own words, write a definition of
    imagery in your sourcebook.

40
  • What is Imagery?
  • Imagery is not only visual images.
  • It incorporates imaginative language that
    describes all sensory experience including sound,
    taste, touch, smell, and sight.
  • My Grandmother is waiting for me to come home.
  • Before reading...
  • Divide one page of your sourcebook in half. On
    the left draw a picture or write a description of
    your grandmothers house.
  • After reading
  • On the right, draw a picture or write a
    description of what you remember from this poem.
  • After receiving the poem, underline the details
    you remembered, circle the details you forgot.

41
  • What examples of imagery do you find in this
    poem?
  • Create a graphic organizer to show the imagery in
    the poem.
  • This should be drawn and completed in your
    sourcebook.
  • Written Response - Fifth Grade Autobiography
  • Write a poem that contains detailed imagery
    describing you and your family or you and your
    home at an earlier point in your life.
  • Use the themes of home and family.
  • Incorporate the picture you brought of your
    younger self.

42
E.Q. How can different authors offer unique
perspectives on the same topic?
  • Family Home
  • Look back at your first definitions.
  • Rewrite those definitions now that we have read
    more selections.
  • Traits List
  • Create a chart in your sourcebook with traits
    down the column on the left and the titles of the
    four stories across the top. (This will later
    become a larger chart you will present to the
    class.)
  • Complete these checklists as you read today.

43
Traits of Family
Trait She didnt give up on me Lessons in Baseball The Champ I am Home
Caring/Love
Rely/Trust
Related (Blood or Marriage)
Friendship
Constant Never-ending
44
  • Jigsaw Activity
  • Read the story you have been assigned.
  • Complete the chart in your sourcebook.
  • Reading Selections
  • She Didnt Give Up On Me page 63
  • Lessons in Baseball page 89
  • The Champ page 92
  • I am Home page 97

45
  • Group Assignments
  • Work with your group to answer the questions
    about your specific selection.
  • Complete the chart to be presented to the class.
  • Make sure to include vocabulary words from your
    selection to share with the class.
  • Family Quotes
  • Refine your definition.
  • Create a quote that you will use in our next
    writing assessment.

46
E.Q. How do authors use symbolism to further
their arguments?
  • Love Kindness
  • Look back this epigraph.
  • How do you reflect on this quote now?
  • Write this in your source book.
  • Choice Reading
  • Read one of these stories.
  • Tigress page 102
  • Bright Heart page 106

47
  • Written Responses
  • Debate Can animals be family members?
  • How do you reflect on this quote now that you
    have completed the reading?
  • Write a journal entry that answers this question.
  • To Hug or Not to Hug?
  • In both stories, characters show their kindness
    and love by offering a hug to a virtual stranger.
  • Are there times when hugs are and are not
    appropriate?
  • Why are hugs so powerful?
  • Write a journal entry about a time when you
    needed, received, or gave a hug that either
    comforted you or someone else.

48
E.Q. How can paying close attention to details
such as dialect help you uncover the authors
purpose?
  • Dialect List
  • Make a list of words or phrases that are examples
    of dialect.
  • Remember, dialect is a regional variety of
    language distinguished by features of vocabulary,
    grammar, and pronunciation from other regional
    varieties and constituting together with them a
    single language.

49
  • Vocabulary Homework Due 11-16-12
  • suede
  • frail
  • ominous
  • discrimination
  • astounded
  • bigotry
  • resolve
  • egregious
  • prejudice
  • prestigious

50
  • Thank You, Mam by Langston Hughes
  • Draw this dialect chart in your source book.
  • As you read today, write examples of dialect that
    you notice in the story.

Dialect Context Meaning Rewrite the sentence without the unique dialect to demonstrate comprehension.
aint I aint gonna do that. arent, are not, or am not I am not going to do that.




51
  • Written Response
  • Imagine that you are the boy.
  • Write a journal entry detailing what happened and
    how you felt as you walked home.
  • Make sure to refer to specific events that
    happened in the story as you write your reaction.
  • Think about these questions
  • How did the womans kindness affect the boy?
  • What lesson did she think she was teaching him?
  • What was the authors purpose in writing this
    story?
  • What did he hope readers would learn from it?
  • How could you apply the lesson in this story to
    your life?
  • How is this story a tale of love and kindness?

52
E.Q. How do personal essays and news articles
differ in purpose and tone?
  • What is tone?
  • Write a definition for the literary term, tone,
    in your own words.
  • Tone is the mood or emotion that the writer
    expresses in the story. Language elements help to
    tell us the tone of a story.

53
  • Mason Dixon Memory page 119
  • Draw this chart in your source book.
  • After reading this selection, we will compare it
    with two news stories.

Story Dialect Tone Purpose
A Mason Dixon Memory
Examples from the Text
Country Club Reviews Policy Banning Blacks
Examples from the Text
Golfing World Must Still Deal with Club Racism
Examples from the Text
54
  • Mason Dixon Memory page 119
  • Country Club Reviews Policy Banning Blacks
  • http//articles.latimes.com/1991-04-22/sports/sp-4
    48_1_country-club
  • Golfing World Must Still Deal with Club Racism
  • http//articles.baltimoresun.com/1991-04-26/sports
    /1991116035_1_shoal-creek-country-clubs-black

55
  • Express Yourself
  • Write a reflection in your sourcebook that
    expresses your feelings and your opinions about
    any form of discrimination.
  • Make sure to include references to the texts that
    we have read. Use your chart to help you add
    details.
  • Use at least three reasons to defend your
    opinion.

56
E.Q. How can I use textual evidence to support
an argumentative essay?
  • Writing Assessment 2.
  • Argumentative
  • Elements to include
  • Claim
  • Reasons Evidence
  • Call to Action
  • What thinking map could you use as your
    pre-writing/writing plan?

57
Writing Assessment 2. What is a family?
(Argumentative)
  • Sections 3 and 4 of Chicken Soup for the Teenage
    Soul feature stories of love, kindness, and the
    complicated nature of families.
  • After reading these sections, write an
    argumentative essay that takes a stance on the
    following question What is a family?
  • Do you believe that families only consist of
    people who are related by blood, or can people
    who are not biologically related, like
    stepsiblings or an adoptive parent and child,
    become just as close as traditional families?
  • To begin this essay, write your own definition of
    family.
  • Then use examples from Chicken Soup, other
    stories and poems read in class, movies and
    television, or your life to defend your point.
  • In your conclusion, summarize your main points to
    convince your audience to agree with your
    definition of family.
  • You must use at least 5 vocabulary words from the
    last two lists in your essay.

58
E.Q. How can I use textual evidence to support
an argumentative essay?
  • Writing Assessment 2.
  • Today
  • Focus on Revising Editing
  • Use Your Writing Plan as Your Checklist
  • Be prepared to complete your Final Drafts!
  • Final Drafts are DUE FRIDAY!!

59
E.Q. How can I follow specific procedures to
move my essay from a rough draft to a final draft?
  • Writing Assessment 2.
  • Argumentative
  • Final Drafts
  • DUETODAY!!!!!
  • Vocabulary Homework is DUE TODAY!

60
E.Q. What are the pronoun cases and how do I
know when to use each case?
  • Pronouns
  • List the seven (7) types of pronouns, their
    definitions and at least two (2) examples.
  • Pronoun Case Notes

61
  • Vocabulary List Homework Due 11-30-12
  • intact
  • daze
  • pursued
  • complication
  • endure
  • elated
  • euphoria
  • dedicated
  • placidly
  • feign

62
  • Relationships
  • Read the Jamison Quote on page 1.
  • In your source book, discuss the quote and give
    an example of a time when you drifted apart from
    someone.
  • Reading Selections
  • Losing the Us page 3
  • The Story of Us by Taylor Swift
  • Compare these two selections using an appropriate
    thinking map or graphic organizer.
  • Include comments about Pronoun Use!

63
  • Written Response
  • Craft a written response that includes the
    following information
  • How are the texts similar?
  • How are they different?
  • Which one represents how you think most teens
    about breakups? Explain.
  • If the story was rewritten as a song and recorded
    by Taylor Swift, what would the video look like?

64
  • Written Response
  • Craft a written response that includes the
    following information
  • How are the texts similar?
  • How are they different?
  • Which one represents how you think most teens
    about breakups? Explain.
  • If the story was rewritten as a song and recorded
    by Taylor Swift, what would the video look like?
  • Now, adapt the story into a song.

65
E.Q. How is irony used in literature?
  • What is irony?
  • Write a definition of this literary element in
    your sourcebook.
  • Irony is the use of words to convey the opposite
    of their literal meaning a statement or
    situation where the meaning is contradicted by
    the appearance or presentation of the idea.
  • Example It is ironic that the name of Britains
    biggest dog is Tiny.

66
  • Reading Selections
  • After Awhile page 7
  • The Miss of a Great Miss page 11
  • As you read, create a list of pronouns.
  • Identify the type and case.
  • List examples of irony.

67
  • Written Response
  • Find other examples of irony.
  • Locate poems or stories. (You can also use
    library books, the literature books, or music
    that you already know.)

68
E.Q. What resources can I use to help my peers
deal with tough challenges?
  • Challenges
  • Make a list of challenges that teens face today.
  • Reading Choices
  • Gabby, Youre so Skinny page 208
  • 8th Grade Petitions Seventeen Magazine to
    Feature Un-Airbrushed Photos by Lindsey Davis
    and Jenna Millman

69
  • Written Response
  • Create a poster or brochure to help teens deal
    with a challenge.
  • Choose any challenge that you would like.
  • Create a sign to help teens deal with this
    challenge.
  • We will be posting these around the school.

70
E.Q. How can our peers become our inspiration?
  • What inspires you?
  • Make a list of things, people, or events that
    inspire you.
  • Reading Choices
  • Ill always be with you page 186
  • Yellow Cards
  • http//www.yellowribbon.org/
  • http//my.hsj.org/DesktopModules/ASNE/ASNE.Newspap
    ers/Mobile.aspx?newspaperid2526editionid0categ
    oryid0articleid427050userid0

71
  • Written Response
  • Desiderata page 214
  • Complete a reflection that includes the answers
    to these questions
  • Would these words provide comfort to someone
    facing a challenge? Give examples.
  • Who needs to hear these words the most?
  • Who would you share these words? Why?

72
E.Q. How can I synthesize lessons Ive learned
from this unit into a clear and coherent argument?
  • Focus!
  • Copy the essential question into your sourcebook.
  • Underline the critical terms.
  • Write the definitions for these terms.
  • Review the 100 Minute Writing Model

73
Writing Assessment 3 Is Love Worth the Cost of
Loss? (Argumentative) Due MONDAY a.t.e.o.c.
  1. In his poem, In Memorium A.H.H., Alfred, Lord
    Tennyson writes, I hold it true, whateer
    befall/ I feel it, when I sorrow most/Tis
    better to have loved and lost/Than never to have
    loved at all after the death of a close friend.
  2. In her essay, Losing the Us, Lia Gay alludes
    to Tennysons poem when discussing a painful
    breakup. Do you agree with this perspective? Is
    the joy of love worth the pain of loss?
  3. Write an argument to express your opinion on this
    statement.
  4. Begin by stating your thesis, or point of view,
    in the introductory paragraph.
  5. Then use examples from Chicken Soup for the
    Teenage Soul, your life, other books, movies, or
    songs to provide evidence for your argument.
  6. In your conclusion, summarize your main points to
    convince your audience to agree with your thesis.
  7. Use at least five (5) new vocabulary words in
    your essay.

74
E.Q. How can I revise my writing to strengthen
my voice so my purpose and tone are clear to my
audience?
  • R.A.F.T.
  • Create a R.A.F.T. chart in your sourcebook.
  • Read back over your rough draft to check on these
    elements.
  • Make the changes you need to strengthen your
    voice before completing your final draft.
  • Final drafts are due by the end of the class
    period.

75
R A F T
ROLE AUDIENCE FORMAT TONE
What is your job as a writer? What is the purpose of this essay? Who are you speaking to? What vocabulary does this audience expect to hear? What does the audience already know, and what do they need to know about your topic? What structural elements are required in this essay? What is the appropriate attitude for you to have as the writer? How do you feel about your topic, and how can you communicate that to your audience?

76
  • Vocabulary List Homework Due 12-7-12
  • redeemed
  • betrayal
  • commitment
  • cringe
  • passionate
  • reinforce
  • discord
  • diligent
  • confounding
  • sensation

77
E.Q. How do you define success?
  • What is Success?
  • Define the word success in your own words.
  • Make three different lists of people who you
    think are successful.
  • Name at least three (3) things all of these
    people have in common.

People in Your Family People in Your School People in the World







78
  • Reading Selections
  • What is Success page 218
  • Be Cool Stay in School page 219
  • Written Response
  • How would Jason Summey define success?
  • Using 2-3 examples from the text, write a
    paragraph that answers this question.

79
  • Reading Selections
  • What is Success page 218
  • Be Cool Stay in School page 219
  • Written Response
  • How would Jason Summey define success?
  • Using 2-3 examples from the text, write a
    paragraph that answers this question.
  • We are going to gather these paragraphs into a
    booklet. As a class, write an introduction
    explaining that success means different things to
    different people. Then write a conclusion
    examining why people have different opinions on
    success.

80
E.Q. How can stories about other students teach
us how to succeed?
  • Reflection
  • Reflect on the quote on page 240.
  • What does this sentiment mean to you?
  • Reading Selections
  • Broken Wing page 240
  • Passing Dream page 243

81
  • Paraphrasing
  • A paraphrase is a restatement of a text or
    passage in another form or other words, often to
    clarify meaning.
  • Written Response
  • Write an analysis of the poem.
  • Paraphrase each stanza.

82
E.Q. What does it mean to go for it?
  • Describe a time when you had to go for it.
  • Reading Selection
  • Helen Keller and Anne Sullivan page 264
  • Movie The Miracle Worker
  • As we experience this true story, think about how
    you will answer this question
  • How does Helen Kellers story relate to the
    prejudice many people deal with disabilities
    face?

83
  • Written Response
  • Write an essay that answers this question
  • How does Helen Kellers story relate to the
    prejudice many people deal with disabilities
    face?
  • Make sure to include references to the texts
    (this includes the movie).

84
E.Q. How can literature teach readers to be more
tolerant people?
  • From what we get, we can make a living, what we
    give however, makes a life.
  • Write this in your own words.
  • Explain what it means and decide if y ou agree or
    disagree with it.

85
  • Vocabulary List Homework Due 12-14-12
  • frantic
  • convulsing
  • jarring
  • extent
  • scrutinize
  • agonize
  • remedy
  • podium
  • resurrect
  • disregard

86
  • Reading Selection
  • The Boy Who Talked to Dolphins page 274
  • No Hair Day page 291
  • Life Lessons
  • Make a list of life lessons that are taught in
    these stories.

87
  • In Class Essay
  • Write an in class essay comparing Jeff and
    Allison.
  • The introduction should include a thesis
    statement that states the lesson readers can
    learn from the two stories.
  • Each body paragraph should include textual
    evidence that demonstrates how the story
    communicates that lesson.
  • The conclusion should suggest some behaviors or
    actions students should engage in after reading
    the selections.

88
E.Q. What rights do we have and what rights do
we need?
  • The first ten amendments of the U. S.
    Constitution are known as the Bill of Rights.
  • Name as many of the amendments as you know.
  • Write down the rights that you think U. S.
    citizens should have.
  • http//www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/bill_of_
    rights_transcript.html

89
  • Reading Selection
  • Teenagers Bill of Rights page 272
  • How does it relate to the Bill of Rights?
  • Do you like its organization, or could it be made
    more clear?
  • Should it contain more than three sections?
  • Do you agree with it?
  • Is it missing anything?
  • Written Response
  • Make a list of rights that you believe middle
    school students should have.
  • Explain each right and why you believe it is
    important.

90
  • Reading Selection
  • Teenagers Bill of Rights page 272
  • How does it relate to the Bill of Rights?
  • Do you like its organization, or could it be made
    more clear?
  • Should it contain more than three sections?
  • Do you agree with it?
  • Is it missing anything?
  • Group Activity
  • Create a Middle School Students Bill of Rights.
  • You should follow the same format as the U. S.
    Bill of Rights.
  • Ten Rights
  • A paragraph that explains each right.

91
  • Writing Assessment 4 Middle School Survival
    Guide (Informative /Explanatory)
  • Chicken Soup for the Teenage Soul contains many
    stories of teens in crisis due to problems with
    their peers, relationships, families, and
    schools. Using stories from Chicken Soup for the
    Teenage Soul as inspiration, create a guide to
    help middle school students in crisis.
  • In your introduction, discuss how to identify a
    friend who is in need of help.
  • Then, create at least four sections to discuss
    how to handle problems with 1) peers, 2)
    relationships, 3) families, and 4) school. Each
    section must
  • ? Begin with an inspirational or
    thought-provoking quote with a cited source and
    an explanation of the quote.
  • ? Include an original short story, poem, or short
    essay on the topic.
  • ? Include an annotated list of at least three
    resources that can help middle school students.
    These resources can include books, websites, and
    programs.
  • Finally, this guide must contain an interview
    with an adult who is not related to you. Think
    about counselors, teachers, clergy, club
    sponsors, or people who work for organizations
    geared towards teens. In your interview, ask the
    adult his or her advice on how to help out a
    friend in need.
  • Remember! You cannot solve all of lives problems
    on your own. Include information on programs like
    the Yellow Ribbon Program, featured in Chicken
    Soup, programs in your community, and programs in
    your school that can help other students.

92
  • Writing Assessment 4 Middle School Survival
    Guide (Informative /Explanatory)
  • Brochures
  • Booklets
  • PowerPoint Presentations
  • Oral Presentations

93
E.Q. How can I determine whether or not a quote
is inspirational and then communicate its power
to an audience?
  • Quotes of Inspiration
  • Which quote from a reading selection has been
    most inspirational to you?
  • Research Writing
  • Use sources to locate information for your
    survival guide.

94
E.Q. How can I use research tools to find
services to help others in need?
  • Research Writing
  • Today you need to focus on reliable resources.
  • What makes a resource reliable?

95
E.Q. How can I synthesize information, research,
and writing from multiple genres to create a
coherent whole?
  • Research Writing
  • Today you need to focus on how your information
    is related.
  • Organize the different pieces into a structure
    that puts like parts together.

96
E.Q. How can I use research tools to find
services to help others in need?
  • Research Writing
  • Try out different search engines.
  • Revise Edit
  • Final Drafts are DUE WEDNESDAY

97
E.Q. How can I communicate my written word
through an oral presentation?
  • Research Writing
  • Complete Final Drafts
  • Final Drafts are DUE WEDNESDAY
  • Oral Presentations
  • Prepare to Present your Survival Guide

98
E.Q. How can I communicate my written word
through an oral presentation?
  • Oral Presentations
  • Brochures
  • Booklets
  • PowerPoint Presentations
About PowerShow.com