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Chapter 8 POLITICS IN THE GILDED AGE

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Chapter 8 POLITICS IN THE GILDED AGE Section 1: Political Machines Section 2: Restoring Honest Government Section 3: The Populist Movement Political machines during ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Chapter 8 POLITICS IN THE GILDED AGE


1
Chapter 8 POLITICS IN THE GILDED AGE
  • Section 1 Political Machines
  • Section 2 Restoring Honest Government
  • Section 3 The Populist Movement

2
SECTION 1
Political Machines
Ways in Which Machines Recruited and Rewarded
Immigrants
Why Immigrants Were Important to Machines
welcomed immigrants upon arrival found
immigrants temporary housing and jobs helped
immigrants become naturalized citizens
helped immigrants with finances, funerals,
and so on
represented a huge supply of supporters and
voters tended to be particularly loyal to
machines/ POLITICAL PARTIES
POLITICAL MACHINES AND IMMIGRANTS
3
Political machines
Section 1 Political Machines
  • during the late 1800s well-organized political
    parties dominated city governments in the U.S.
    because of their success in getting their members
    elected to local political offices, these parties
    were called political machines.
  • Political machines controlled votes by offering
    jobs, political favors, and services to loyal
    supporters.

4
  • I know what Parks (NYC Politician) is doing,
    but what do I care? He has raised my wages. Let
    him have his (illegal gains)
  • Bosses may dictate voting patterns, control
    appointments, and wield considerable influence in
    other political processes. They do not
    necessarily hold public office themselves. In
    fact, most historical bosses did not.

5
Blue Low Red High
6
Importance of immigrants
Section 1 Political Machines
  • easily accessiblecould be welcomed on arrival
  • had many needs for housing, jobs, and services
  • represented a huge supply of supporters and
    voters
  • tended to be loyal to machines

7
I am the BOSS of this Boat
  • YOU CAN CALL ME SKIPPER
  • BECAUSE THE WAY I TURN THIS MONEY OVER YOU CAN
    CALL ME FLIPPER

8

9
Corruption and illegal activities
Section 1 Political Machines
  • Machines hired men to vote early and often.
  • Bosses took bribes, payoffs, and kickbacks.

10
  • William Magear "Boss" Tweed (April 3, 1823
    April 12, 1878) was an American politician and
    head of Tammany Hall, the name given to the
    Democratic Party political machine that played a
    major role in the history of 19th century New
    York City politics.
  • He was convicted and eventually imprisoned for
    stealing millions of dollars from the city
    through political corruption. He was of
    Scottish-Irish descent.

11
Collapse of Tweeds support
Section 1 Political Machines
  • Thomas Nasts cartoons revealed Tweeds
    corruption, even to people who couldnt read very
    well.
  • The New York Times published a series of articles
    exposing Tweed.

12
Restoring Honest Government
SECTION 2
13
SECTION 2
Restoring Honest Government
14
Desire for reform
Section 2 Restoring Honest Government
  • Americans wanted political reform and honest
    officials because corruption had become so
    widespread. This desire split the Republican
    Party into the Stalwarts and the Half-Breeds.

15
President Arthur
Section 2 Restoring Honest Government
  • Arthur began to support reform after the
    assassination of President Garfield, and this led
    to reform Republicans voting for Cleveland, the
    Democratic candidate, in the election of 1884.

16
Harrisons response to Clevelands reforms
Section 2 Restoring Honest Government
  • returned to political patronage
  • spent money on Republican pet projects

17
SECTION 3
The Populist Movement
Efforts to Help Farmers
Factors that Weakened Efforts
FARMERS ORGANIZATIONS
18
Economic hardships for farmers
Section 3 The Populist Movement
  • heavy debts
  • high freight and machinery costs
  • falling crop prices

19
Farmers movements
Section 3 The Populist Movement
  • hoped to pressure states to regulate freight
    and grain-storage rates
  • formed cooperatives
  • offered low-cost insurance
  • lobbied for graduated income tax
  • weakened by government limits on the power of ICC
  • weakened by racial segregation

20
Money backed by silver
Section 3 The Populist Movement
  • Farmers supported money backed by silver because
    they wanted to increase the paper money supply.
    As long as only gold was allowed to back paper,
    the money supply was restricted by how much gold
    the treasury had.

21
Populist Party issues
Section 3 The Populist Movement
  • graduated income tax
  • bank regulation
  • government ownership of railroad and telegraph
    companies
  • free coinage of silver
  • immigration restrictions
  • shorter workday
  • voting reforms

22
The effects of silver
Section 3 The Populist Movement
  • Silver was a central issue in the 1896
    presidential campaign.
  • Populists supported Bryan because of his stand on
    silver.
  • William McKinley won the election with the
    support of business leaders who opposed free
    silver.
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