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Chapter 1: What is the Bible?

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Chapter 1: What is the Bible? Understanding the Scriptures ALTERNATIVE ASSESSMENT Divide the students into groups of three or four and complete the first part of ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Chapter 1: What is the Bible?


1
Chapter 1 What is the Bible?
  • Understanding the Scriptures

2
1. Introductory Lesson for first day of class
  • Syllabus.
  • How the lessons of this text will be taught.
  • Instructional policy.
  • Materials.
  • Homework.

3
1. Introductory Lesson for first day of class
  • HOMEWORK
  • Reading
  • Read Chapter 1 through the sidebar Periods
    of Bible History (p. 69)

4
2. Scripture, Tradition, and the Magisterium
  • ANTICIPATORY SET
  • Explain to the students St. Paul wrote the Second
    Epistle to Timothy near the end of his life when
    he was in prison for having preached the Gospel.
    St. Paul had ordained St. Timothy a bishop and
    gave him advice to carry out his ministry.
  • Have each student complete a focused reading on
    2 Timothy 310-45, using the following question
  • What is the nature of Sacred Scripture, and what
    are its purposes?
  • Have each student work with a partner to focus
    on verse 16, and, using a dictionary if
    necessary, explain what the verse means.

5
2. Scripture, Tradition, and the Magisterium
  • BASIC QUESTIONS
  • In what two ways is the Word of God transmitted,
    and who has the authority to interpret it
    authoritatively?
  • KEY IDEAS
  • The Word of God is transmitted by Sacred
    Scripture and Sacred Tradition, and its
    authoritative interpretation has been entrusted
    solely to the Magisterium of the Church.

6
2. Scripture, Tradition, and the Magisterium
FOCUS QUESTIONS
  • What does inspired mean?
  • Literally, inspired means breathed in. With
    respect to the Sacred Scriptures, it means God
    the Holy Spirit guided the Sacred Authors who
    wrote the books of the Bible.
  • Who are the two authors of the Sacred Scriptures?
  • God is the principal author of Scripture the
    human authors are also true authors who, when
    they wrote, acted as free, subordinate,
    intelligent instruments of the Holy Spirit.
  • What does inerrant mean with respect to the
    Sacred Scriptures?
  • It means Scripture does not err in teaching the
    truth God wishes it to teach.

7
2. Scripture, Tradition, and the Magisterium
  • GUIDED EXERCISE
  • Conduct a think/pair/share on the paragraph
    Reading Sacred Scripture . . . (p. 7), and then
    ask the students the following question
  • How is reading Sacred Scripture like receiving
    the Eucharist?

8
2. Scripture, Tradition, and the Magisterium
  • GUIDED EXERCISE
  • Conduct a think/pair/share using the following
    questions to better understand the Catechism,
    nos. 889892 (p. 8).
  • 889 How do the People of God share in the
    infallibility of Christ?
  • 890 What is the task of the Magisterium?
  • 890 What is the pastoral duty of the
    Magisterium?
  • 890 What charism (gift) of the Holy Spirit did
    Christ give the Magisterium to carry out its
    pastoral duty?
  • 891 What two forms does infallibility take?
  • 891 How should the faithful respond to an
    infallible teaching?
  • 892 How should the faithful respond to an
    ordinary, or non-infallible, teaching of the Pope
    or the bishops with him?

9
2. Scripture, Tradition, and the Magisterium
FOCUS QUESTIONS
  • If Christianity is not a religion of the book,
    what is it?
  • It is a religion of the divine Person of Jesus
    Christ, who is the living Word of God.
  • Who is the central Person found in Sacred
    Scripture?
  • Jesus Christ is the central Person in Scripture.
  • Why should people study Sacred Scripture?
  • People study so they can come to know Jesus
    Christ and his teachings.

10
2. Scripture, Tradition, and the Magisterium
  • CLOSURE
  •  
  • Have each student write a paragraph about the
    relationship among Sacred Scripture, Tradition,
    and the Magisterium.

11
2. Scripture, Tradition, and the Magisterium
  • HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT
  • Reading
  • How the Bible Was Written through The Bible Is
    Religious (pp. 1013)
  • Study Questions
  • Questions 111.
  • Workbook
  • Questions 18.

12
2. Scripture, Tradition, and the Magisterium
  • ALTERNATIVE ASSESSMENT
  •  
  • Have each student free write for five minutes
    about the relationship between the four Catechism
    questions on page 8 (nos. 889892) and the
    passage from 2 Timothy in the Anticipatory Set
    (p. 7).

13
3. The Bible as Religious History
  • ANTICIPATORY SET
  • Explain the Bible contains a tremendous variety
    of writing styles. This is due to its many
    different authors, who wrote about different
    events and for different reasons over thousands
    of years.

14
3. The Bible as Religious History
  • BASIC QUESTIONS
  • What is the relationship between the human and
    divine authorship of the Sacred Scriptures?
  • Why is it important to understand the books of
    the Bible as works of human literature?
  • What kind of history does the Bible contain?
  • KEY IDEAS
  • The Bible was written by inspired Sacred Authors
    who wrote only what God wanted consequently, it
    is true and without error.
  • To understand the Bible, one needs to take into
    account the authors intentions, which can be
    discovered through literary modes and
    circumstances.
  • The Bible presents religion, specifically
    salvation history.

15
3. The Bible as Religious History
  • GUIDED EXERCISE
  • The Bible contains a tremendous variety of
    writing styles. This is due to its many different
    authors, writing about different events and for
    different reasons across millennia.
  • Conduct a think/pair/share to look up the
    following biblical passages and match each with
    the category that most accurately fits the
    passage.

Luke 114 Song of Songs 2813 Chronicles
2117 Romans 614 Revelation 1216
Complicated theology Symbolic vision Beautiful
poetry Accurate history Family genealogy
16
3. The Bible as Religious History
FOCUS QUESTIONS
  • Why is the Bible literature?
  • The Bible uses literary forms and techniques to
    convey its meaning.
  • How does the Book of Genesis shed light on
    Jeremiah 423?
  • Jeremiah drew on imagery from the creation
    narrative to communicate how terrible Gods
    judgment would be against Judah. It was as if God
    would uncreate Judah.
  • What does it mean to describe a Sacred Authors
    intention?
  • Intention describes what the Sacred Author wanted
    to affirm and what God wanted to reveal by his
    words.
  • Extension In every book of the Bible there are
    two intentions what the Sacred Author intended
    and what God intends. Gods intention often goes
    beyond the intention of the Sacred Author for
    example, many passages in the Old Testament
    foreshadow Christ without the Sacred Author
    having realized it.

17
3. The Bible as Religious History
  • GUIDED EXERCISE
  • Conduct a think/pair/share using the following
    question
  • How can the Sacred Authors intention be
    discovered in a particular passage of the Bible?

18
3. The Bible as Religious History
FOCUS QUESTIONS
  • Why are different personalities recognized in the
    books of the Bible?
  • The various books of the Bible have very
    different human authors.
  • Why is the Bibleunlike any human bookcompletely
    free from error?
  • The principal author of the Bible is God, who
    cannot err.
  • Why might some ideas in the Bible seem outdated?
  • The Sacred Authors presented their messages in
    ways the people of their time could understand.

19
3. The Bible as Religious History
FOCUS QUESTIONS
  • What is the primary purpose of Sacred Scripture?
  • It conveys religious truths, and it is ordered
    toward the salvation of all people.
  • What are the two senses of Scripture?
  • They are the literal, i.e., that which the Sacred
    Author intended to express, and the spiritual,
    i.e., the meaning when read under the influence
    of the Holy Spirit in light of Christ.
  • How do modern people tend to view religion
    differently than ancient peoples, including the
    authors of Sacred Scripture?
  • Modern people tend to see religion in terms of
    personal experience, whereas the ancient peoples
    saw it as an essential aspect of society
    religion held together history, culture,
    politics, and all else.

20
3. The Bible as Religious History
FOCUS QUESTIONS
  • In what way is every human historian biased?
  • Every human historian writes from a point of
    view, selecting what he considers important and
    interpreting the facts according to his or her
    viewpoint.
  • Why is the Bible unbiased?
  • The principal author is God the Holy Spirit, who
    sees things exactly as they are.
  • What is salvation history?
  • All the history in the Bible is salvation
    history, i.e., the gradual unveiling of Gods
    plan to save all people unfolding through the
    ages.

21
3. The Bible as Religious History
  • GUIDED EXERCISE
  • Have the students analyze the illustration from
    the Biblia Pauperum (p. 22), and then ask them to
    identify the stories in the three central panels.
  • 1. Esau sells his birthright to his brother Jacob
    for a pot of stew.
  • 2. The Devil tries to tempt Christ, promising him
    all the kingdoms of the earth if he will only
    worship him.
  • 3. Adam and Eve eat the forbidden fruit to be
    like gods.
  • Lead a class discussion using the following
    question
  • How can the stories of Esau and Jacob and Adam
    and Eve be read in a spiritual sense, that is, in
    light of the mystery of Christ, who was tempted?

22
3. The Bible as Religious History
  • GUIDED EXERCISE
  • Conduct a think/pair/share using the following
    questions according to the chart Archaeological
    Periods and Biblical Events (p. 13).
  • How many archaeological periods span biblical
    events?
  • Which book of the Bible covers human prehistory?
  • When did Abraham live?
  • In what archaeological period was the Exodus?
  • When was David King of Israel?
  • During which archaeological period did Christ
    appear on Earth?

23
3. The Bible as Religious History
  • CLOSURE
  •  
  • Put the students in groups of three or four to
    brainstorm reasons people might think there are
    errors in the Bible.

24
3. The Bible as Religious History
  • HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT
  • Reading
  • What Salvation History Is through How the Canon
    Came to Be (pp. 1418)
  • Study Questions
  • Questions 1214.
  • Workbook
  • Questions 915.

25
3. The Bible as Religious History
  • ALTERNATIVE ASSESSMENT
  •  
  • Have each student write a paragraph exploring the
    parallel between the human-divine authorship of
    the Bible and the human-divine Incarnation of God
    in Jesus Christ.
  • Briefly share answers.

26
4. Salvation History and the Canon of Scripture
  • ANTICIPATORY SET
  • Administer a closed-book, open-workbook quiz.

27
4. Salvation History and the Canon of Scripture
  • BASIC QUESTIONS
  • What is salvation history?
  • How do the Catholic faithful understand the
    content of their Faith, including the Bible?
  • How did the Church determine which books are
    canonical?
  • KEY IDEAS
  • Salvation history is Gods plan to save humanity,
    specifically the story of the covenants made
    between God and his people.
  • The Church is a guide to understand the Faith,
    including the Sacred Scriptures.
  • The Church formally declared the canon of
    Scripture, based on apostolic Tradition, at the
    Ecumenical Council of Trent.

28
4. Salvation History and the Canon of Scripture
FOCUS QUESTIONS
  • What is salvation history?
  • The Bible, taken as a whole, tells the story of
    Gods plan to save the human race as it has been
    unveiled in history.
  • How is salvation history different from other
    kinds of history?
  • Salvation history includes not only the past but
    the future as well.
  • What is a covenant in the context of the Old
    Testament?
  • In the Old Testament, a covenant was an agreement
    between God and man made through an individual to
    establish a family relationship between God and
    his people.

29
4. Salvation History and the Canon of Scripture
  • GUIDED EXERCISE
  • Have the students analyze the illustration of the
    Garden of Eden (p. 15), and then lead a class
    discussion using the following question
  • What four vignettes of the story of Adam and Eve
    does the artist portray?

30
4. Salvation History and the Canon of Scripture
FOCUS QUESTIONS
  • What are the two major divisions of the Bible?
  • The Old Testament was written before the time of
    Christ, and the New Testament was written after.
  • What prompted early Christians to determine which
    books are canonical, i.e., authored by God and
    should be included in the Bible?
  • Early Christians tried to decide which books to
    include in liturgical worship. The Septuagint, or
    Greek translation of the Old Testament, was used
    in the early Church however, there was some
    disagreement over which of the many writings in
    existence should be included in the New
    Testament.
  • What are some examples of Catholic doctrine found
    in the deuterocanonical books?
  • The Book of Tobit speaks of guardian angels. The
    Second Book of Maccabees teaches people to pray
    for the dead, i.e., the existence of Purgatory.

31
4. Salvation History and the Canon of Scripture
  • GUIDED EXERCISE
  • Deliver a mini-lecture on canonicity and the
    correct interpretation of Scripture.

32
4. Salvation History and the Canon of Scripture
  • CLOSURE
  •  
  • Have each student use his or her notes to write a
    paragraph summarizing the three criteria the
    Church used to determine which books are
    canonical.

33
4. Salvation History and the Canon of Scripture
  • HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT
  • Study Questions
  • Questions 1523.
  • Practical Exercises 12.
  • Workbook
  • Questions 1625 and Vocabulary.

34
4. Salvation History and the Canon of Scripture
  • ALTERNATIVE ASSESSMENT
  •  
  • Divide the students into groups of three or four
    and complete the first part of Practical Exercise
    2 (p. 21), requiring them to interpret Luke
    125153 two different ways.
  • Have a few students share their interpretations,
    and then lead a class discussion about the two
    remaining questions in Practical Exercise 2.

35
The End
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