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Title: CENTENNIAL COLLEGE


1
CENTENNIAL COLLEGE Business Plan 20082009
2
Mission and Vision
Our mission is to educate students for career
success Our vision is to transform lives and
communities through learning
3
Academic Framework
We support the career and personal development of
our learners in every decision we make. We value
and support one another in a process of
continuous learning and improvement. We create a
positive environment for effective learning
within a context of global citizenship and social
justice. We value the diverse profiles of our
learners. Our curriculum, teaching and support
services are characterized by knowledgeable and
enthusiastic teachers, teaching strategies that
suit learners needs and an atmosphere of dignity
and mutual respect. We strive for excellence.
Scholarly debate and applied research contribute
to the quality and distinctiveness of our
learning environment and advance our
instructional and curriculum expertise. We
encourage and engage in evidence-based
deliberation with open minds in an atmosphere of
mutual respect. We consult with and consider
carefully the views of internal and external
stakeholders who have an important perspective on
an issue. We are accountable to our learners,
our communities and the general public for the
quality of the learning experiences we provide,
for the resources we use and for the manner in
which we treat all people. We build evaluation
into all of our work so that we improve
continuously.
4
Academic Framework
To advance our mission, Centennial College
strives to adhere to the following principles
Commit to Student Success We foster excellence
in our students and employees by providing an
equitable foundation that values their
experiences and unique needs. We engage and
support learners in attaining clear, high
standards so that they emerge from Centennial
College positioned for a successful
career. Commit to Access We support broad access
to a college education by providing clear
pathways and supports to meet the requirements of
post-secondary programs. Pursue Excellence We
pursue excellence as a learning organization
through innovation, applied research, critical
analysis, rigour and currency. Be Inclusive We
offer a distinctive, inclusive educational
experience that builds on a foundation of global
citizenship, social justice and
diversity. Integrate Technology We are guided by
the needs of learners and the learning
organization in our use of technology. Promote
Communities of Learning We are committed to
creating communities of learning through
reflective practice, continuous improvement and
lifelong learning. Encourage Partnerships We
encourage sustainable relationships that enrich
student learning, augment job readiness and
provide our graduates with the knowledge and
skills to succeed in work and society. We seek
out partners who are sensitive to socio-cultural
needs, support our objectives and contribute to
our community development goals.
5
Statement of Diversity
  • Centennial College and its Board of Governors
    value and embrace diversity, equity and inclusion
    as fundamental to our mission to educate students
    for career success within a context of global
    citizenship and social justice.
  • Our commitment
  • A safe, secure, inclusive and accessible
    environment for learning, teaching and working
  • Curriculum and instruction that reflect diversity
    and promote equity and inclusion
  • Equitable and accessible opportunities for
    student success
  • Building knowledge and evaluating effectiveness
  • Human resource management systems, policies and
    practices that reflect diversity and promote
    equity and inclusion
  • Training and staff development in equity and
    diversity
  • Accessible and inclusive college communication
  • Strategic engagement with diverse communities
  • Relationships and partnerships that align with
    our mission, vision and values
  • Committing financial and human resources to
    promote diversity, equity and inclusion

6
Core Businesses
FUNDED POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION
Centennial College provides its students with high-quality post-secondary education through relevant and accessible programs. Offered are one-year certificate, two-year and three-year diploma, and four-year degree programs. Centennial is organized into eight distinct schools School of Advancement School of Business School of Community and Health Studies School of Communications, Media and Design School of Continuing Education and Corporate Training School of Engineering Technology and Applied Science School of Hospitality, Tourism and Culture School of Transportation Centennial welcomes a diverse mix of students with varying academic backgrounds, including recent high-school graduates, students transferring from another college or university and mature students.
APPRENTICESHIP TRAINING
Apprenticeship is a proven, industry-based learning system that combines on-the-job experience with technical training. Apprenticeship in Ontario is the responsibility of the provincial government, which offers curricula in a variety of fields. Apprentices work with a qualified tradesperson until they pass the required exams and complete their workplace training. Apprentices then earn a Certificate of Qualification that allows them to work on their own. Centennial College provides a variety of apprenticeship training programs in the fields of transportation and child and youth worker education. The college also delivers pre-apprenticeship training for students who need to upgrade their basic skills before they can enter an apprenticeship program.
7
Core Businesses
BASIC AND ESSENTIAL SKILLS TRAINING
Centennial College provides training for literacy, ESL, numeracy and other skills necessary to prepare learners for career education or to assist them to enter or re-enter the workforce. Basic skills training focuses on goal-directed, learner-centred literacy training that helps learners acquire the essential skills necessary to obtain employment, enrol in further training or education or achieve personal independence. In addition, the college provides a variety of employment preparation services, including employment resource centres for youth and adults, job search workshops and one-on-one employment advice.
INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION
While Centennials primary objective is to accommodate students from Ontario, the college also has an international strategy whereby it seeks global opportunities to enhance its reputation as a leader in education around the world. Centennial recognizes and values the unique contributions international students make to our diverse and multicultural community. Centennials international-student population has increased significantly in recent years, and interest from the international community continues to grow. In addition to making significant cultural contributions, international students, through their tuition fees, provide an important source of revenue. The college reinvests this revenue to provide overall educational advancements and facility improvements. Centennial also seeks opportunities to support its internationalization strategy, which includes partnering with international public and private institutions to deliver applied education globally.
8
Core Businesses
CONTINUING EDUCATION AND CORPORATE TRAINING
Lifelong learning is essential in a rapidly changing world. The School of Continuing Education and Corporate Training offers a variety of programs leading to certificates, diplomas and external certification or qualification. Centennial provides part-time programs and courses targeted to improve the skill levels of the workforce and prepare adult learners for the latest industry requirements. In the corporate training area, we deliver to a wide range of clients, both domestically and abroad. Our programs build on our reputation of delivering applied skillsbased programs to a diverse constituency. Centennials programs are taught by instructors and consultants with strong connections to industry. We offer a range of learning solutions to respond to client demand. Our Centre for Entrepreneurship offers small business start-up training to more than 300 clients annually.
APPLIED RESEARCH
In todays knowledge-based economy, innovation, resourcefulness and speed to market are keys to economic and social prosperity. Centennials Applied Research and Innovation Centre advances knowledge and facilitates technology transfer through a large variety of projects involving industry, community and government partnerships. Applied research advances learning by enabling students to access the most up-to-date knowledge in their field of study. It keeps faculty current and enhances their professional development through hands-on involvement in research projects. It supports Centennials applied-degree programs, articulation agreements, and certification and accreditation processes. Centennial seeks out and strengthens partnerships with local and regional community employers and industries to solve immediate problems and meet specific goals, through applied, market-driven research, development and commercialization.
9
BUSINESS PLAN INITIATIVES20082009
10
Addressing Ontarios skills shortage
The Conference Board of Canada (CBOC) estimates that by 2025 Ontario could face a shortfall of 364,000 workers due to both the aging of the population and the slowing of its growth. This labour shortage is predicted to have a significant impact on the provinces economy, possibly resulting in slower growth in potential output (1). Ontario must engage underrepresented populations, including youth, women, mature workers, immigrants, Aboriginal peoples and people with disabilities, to build its human resources capacity. Given the higher than average unemployment rates among these groups, there is a real need to adopt new approaches to skills development, training and recruitment. The CBOC report assigns significant responsibility to Ontario colleges to help bring these diverse, underrepresented groups into the workplace and to increase their productivity and performance through learning, skills enhancement and accreditation. Working with the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities, Centennial has initiated special projects and programs to address Ontarios skills shortage. A Skills Development Centre is being planned for Centennials Ashtonbee Campus to prepare students for pre-apprenticeship, apprenticeship and mentorship programs tailored for underrepresented demographic groups. The Centre will accommodate hands-on instruction and direct skills training using industry-standard machinery in order to enable advanced technical and applied education. The breadth of Centennials apprenticeship and co-op apprenticeship programs will be expanded similarly. The 2008-09 Provincial Budget included investment for Second Career training for 20,000 manufacturing workers that are currently out of work. The Second Career opportunity supports these workers to secure employment and help Ontario to close its skills shortage gap. Centennial will offer special Second Career programs that will facilitate sustainable long-term employment to the participants. The Conference Board of Canada (CBOC) estimates that by 2025 Ontario could face a shortfall of 364,000 workers due to both the aging of the population and the slowing of its growth. This labour shortage is predicted to have a significant impact on the provinces economy, possibly resulting in slower growth in potential output (1). Ontario must engage underrepresented populations, including youth, women, mature workers, immigrants, Aboriginal peoples and people with disabilities, to build its human resources capacity. Given the higher than average unemployment rates among these groups, there is a real need to adopt new approaches to skills development, training and recruitment. The CBOC report assigns significant responsibility to Ontario colleges to help bring these diverse, underrepresented groups into the workplace and to increase their productivity and performance through learning, skills enhancement and accreditation. Working with the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities, Centennial has initiated special projects and programs to address Ontarios skills shortage. A Skills Development Centre is being planned for Centennials Ashtonbee Campus to prepare students for pre-apprenticeship, apprenticeship and mentorship programs tailored for underrepresented demographic groups. The Centre will accommodate hands-on instruction and direct skills training using industry-standard machinery in order to enable advanced technical and applied education. The breadth of Centennials apprenticeship and co-op apprenticeship programs will be expanded similarly. The 2008-09 Provincial Budget included investment for Second Career training for 20,000 manufacturing workers that are currently out of work. The Second Career opportunity supports these workers to secure employment and help Ontario to close its skills shortage gap. Centennial will offer special Second Career programs that will facilitate sustainable long-term employment to the participants.
Key Activities Planned Accomplishments
Develop a comprehensive Skills Development Centre at Ashtonbee Campus Expand the breadth of apprenticeship and co-op apprenticeship programs Create and promote a Second Career portfolio that will address special needs of unemployed workers and new immigrants Provide specialized advising to underrepresented groups including unemployed workers and new immigrants Preparations completed for the Skills Development Centre and space expanded at Ashtonbee Campus to accommodate new skilled trades programs New programs may include some or all of the following apprenticeship or co-op apprenticeship programs Electrician, Millwright, Machine Builder Integrator, Air Conditioning and Heating Technician, Power Lift Technician and Tool and Die Maker A customized Second Career program portfolio developed Enhanced specialized advising for underrepresented groups from Centennials Advising Centre
(1) The Conference Board of Canada Ontarios
Looming Labour Shortage Challenges, September 25,
2007
11
Learning excellence Signature Learning Experience
Formally launched in April 2008, the Signature Learning Experience (SLE) provides an innovative and integrative educational opportunity that further differentiates our programs from others in the college system, while improving critical thinking and language development skills. The SLE underscores Centennials commitment as a leader in social justice and gives students a unique learning opportunity that focuses on global issues surrounding social justice, human rights, poverty, hunger, technology and diversity. The SLE has four components A required general education core course that provides the foundations for a critical understanding of diversity and the social, political and cultural literacy or cultural competence required for work in the local and global context. The integration of core social and cultural knowledge, competencies and learning activities in the curriculum within all program areas, which will enhance and support the learning goals of the SLE throughout the college. Professional development opportunities for all staff, based on the reflective practice model being used by faculty, which will enhance their pedagogic, curricular and service competencies in critical, inclusive education and praxis. An SLE portfolio (supported by the core general education course) that involves community-based learning opportunities and that requires a demonstration of critical thinking and of learning outcomes in a unique and tangible way. Centennial has developed the GNED 500 course, Global Citizenship From Social Analysis to Social Action, which has been embedded into the model routes of 21 programs. The objective is to integrate GNED 500 to the model routes of all programs. To further the SLE initiative, we plan to embed equity principles in all Centennial programs facilitate the Equity Competencies Portfolio for students and staff and provide professional development for all employees in the areas of equity, inclusion, social justice and human rights. Formally launched in April 2008, the Signature Learning Experience (SLE) provides an innovative and integrative educational opportunity that further differentiates our programs from others in the college system, while improving critical thinking and language development skills. The SLE underscores Centennials commitment as a leader in social justice and gives students a unique learning opportunity that focuses on global issues surrounding social justice, human rights, poverty, hunger, technology and diversity. The SLE has four components A required general education core course that provides the foundations for a critical understanding of diversity and the social, political and cultural literacy or cultural competence required for work in the local and global context. The integration of core social and cultural knowledge, competencies and learning activities in the curriculum within all program areas, which will enhance and support the learning goals of the SLE throughout the college. Professional development opportunities for all staff, based on the reflective practice model being used by faculty, which will enhance their pedagogic, curricular and service competencies in critical, inclusive education and praxis. An SLE portfolio (supported by the core general education course) that involves community-based learning opportunities and that requires a demonstration of critical thinking and of learning outcomes in a unique and tangible way. Centennial has developed the GNED 500 course, Global Citizenship From Social Analysis to Social Action, which has been embedded into the model routes of 21 programs. The objective is to integrate GNED 500 to the model routes of all programs. To further the SLE initiative, we plan to embed equity principles in all Centennial programs facilitate the Equity Competencies Portfolio for students and staff and provide professional development for all employees in the areas of equity, inclusion, social justice and human rights.
Related Strategies Offer a unique learning experience that will distinguish Centennial graduates in the workplace in Ontario, Canada and the world. Create a college environment that will support SLE and develop the college community on SLE principles. Related Strategies Offer a unique learning experience that will distinguish Centennial graduates in the workplace in Ontario, Canada and the world. Create a college environment that will support SLE and develop the college community on SLE principles.
Key Activities Planned Accomplishments
Integrate GNED 500 to academic programs Support students and staff to create Equity Competencies Portfolio investigate and facilitate E-portfolio opportunities Embed equity principles in Centennial programs Provide training for all employees in the areas of equity, inclusion, social justice and human rights Inform internal and external stakeholders about SLE GNED 500 implemented in all programs in fall 2008 E-portfolio options for students and staff investigated and recommended Curriculum and recruitment materials to impose equity principles reviewed and revised SLE workshops offered to employees Internal and external stakeholders of the college informed about SLE through a gathering in April 2008
12
Learning excellence Enhance academic quality and
occupational relevance
In winter 2008, Centennial successfully completed its Program Quality Assurance Processes Audit (PQAPA), performed by three independent auditors. The audit confirmed that our processes meet all five of the quality criteria assessed by the auditors. We have a strong commitment to academic quality and continuous improvement. We are now compiling our individual quality processes and practices into a comprehensive Quality Management System (QMS) guideline. Both students and colleges pay a high price for student attrition. We have outstanding student retention practices, but they are not implemented uniformly by all programs. One of our objectives this year is to create a college-wide and streamlined retention process derived from best practices. Another way to ensure academic quality and occupational relevance is through the external accreditation of programs. Last year, we initiated the accreditation of 13 technology programs by the Canadian Technology Accreditation Board. We aim to obtain external accreditation of all of our programs when and where possible. We are developing an Academic Quality Index tool as part of the colleges Balanced Scorecard. The index combines indicators measuring program currency and the effectiveness of program delivery. The new tool will be tested and implemented for all programs during 200809. We continue to advance the reflective practice process for our faculty. Under a new program, we aim to have 85 of our full-time faculty and half of contract faculty in the School of Community and Health Studies (SCHS) complete a self-evaluation. To strengthen occupational relevance, SCHS will review and renew curriculum of five of its programs. In winter 2008, Centennial successfully completed its Program Quality Assurance Processes Audit (PQAPA), performed by three independent auditors. The audit confirmed that our processes meet all five of the quality criteria assessed by the auditors. We have a strong commitment to academic quality and continuous improvement. We are now compiling our individual quality processes and practices into a comprehensive Quality Management System (QMS) guideline. Both students and colleges pay a high price for student attrition. We have outstanding student retention practices, but they are not implemented uniformly by all programs. One of our objectives this year is to create a college-wide and streamlined retention process derived from best practices. Another way to ensure academic quality and occupational relevance is through the external accreditation of programs. Last year, we initiated the accreditation of 13 technology programs by the Canadian Technology Accreditation Board. We aim to obtain external accreditation of all of our programs when and where possible. We are developing an Academic Quality Index tool as part of the colleges Balanced Scorecard. The index combines indicators measuring program currency and the effectiveness of program delivery. The new tool will be tested and implemented for all programs during 200809. We continue to advance the reflective practice process for our faculty. Under a new program, we aim to have 85 of our full-time faculty and half of contract faculty in the School of Community and Health Studies (SCHS) complete a self-evaluation. To strengthen occupational relevance, SCHS will review and renew curriculum of five of its programs.
Related Strategies Obtain official certification of programs by professional and industry associations. Implement faculty evaluation and administrative staff performance management. Enhance utilization of Program Advisory Committees. Related Strategies Obtain official certification of programs by professional and industry associations. Implement faculty evaluation and administrative staff performance management. Enhance utilization of Program Advisory Committees.
Key Activities Planned Accomplishments
Follow up on PQAPA recommendations. Convert recommendations into affirmations and commendations Obtain external accreditation of programs Develop an Academic Quality Index tool that measures program currency and effectiveness of program delivery Develop a process whereby faculty participate in reflective practice, goal setting and evaluation Develop programs based on needs assessment and enrolment management plan QMS guide created. College-wide retention processes and practices developed Accreditation of technology programs and external review of joint programs with University of Toronto Scarborough completed Academic Quality Index completed and implemented for all programs Faculty participating in reflective practice reaches 85 of full-time and 50 of contract faculty. Curriculum of the designated health sciences programs renewed by fall 2008
13
Learning excellence Enhance academic quality and
occupational relevance
One of the pillars of our academic quality assurance system is the program review process. We recently enhanced our program review process for both annual and comprehensive reviews. We created a new Annual Review Questionnaire (ARQ), which simplifies the work of the reviewer while enabling a thorough analysis of program strengths and weaknesses through a special marking system. The marking system also facilitates benchmarking of the reviewed program against the programs reviewed previously. Our new comprehensive review process is now fully aligned with the PQAPA criteria, ensuring a seamless integration with PQAPA principles and objectives. This year, all programs will be reviewed according to the new ARQ, and 11 programs will undergo a comprehensive review. To ensure the success of the program review processes, the Centre for Organizational Learning and Teaching (COLT) will conduct training sessions for the reviewers. Todays students are active learners, proficient at working in teams and adept with the latest technology. They need immediate access to current, relevant, high-quality information and resource materials in print and digital formats, including multimedia. To address their needs, we plan to build a new library at Progress Campus. The new library is designed as a safe and welcoming study area that reinforces classroom- and lab workbased learning and will offer a unique library experience for students and faculty. With the increasing demand for continuing education courses by employers to upgrade employees skills and knowledge, the college works with community, businesses and industry partners to ensure that School of Continuing Education and Corporate Training offers current curriculum and courses. One of the pillars of our academic quality assurance system is the program review process. We recently enhanced our program review process for both annual and comprehensive reviews. We created a new Annual Review Questionnaire (ARQ), which simplifies the work of the reviewer while enabling a thorough analysis of program strengths and weaknesses through a special marking system. The marking system also facilitates benchmarking of the reviewed program against the programs reviewed previously. Our new comprehensive review process is now fully aligned with the PQAPA criteria, ensuring a seamless integration with PQAPA principles and objectives. This year, all programs will be reviewed according to the new ARQ, and 11 programs will undergo a comprehensive review. To ensure the success of the program review processes, the Centre for Organizational Learning and Teaching (COLT) will conduct training sessions for the reviewers. Todays students are active learners, proficient at working in teams and adept with the latest technology. They need immediate access to current, relevant, high-quality information and resource materials in print and digital formats, including multimedia. To address their needs, we plan to build a new library at Progress Campus. The new library is designed as a safe and welcoming study area that reinforces classroom- and lab workbased learning and will offer a unique library experience for students and faculty. With the increasing demand for continuing education courses by employers to upgrade employees skills and knowledge, the college works with community, businesses and industry partners to ensure that School of Continuing Education and Corporate Training offers current curriculum and courses.
Related Strategies Align curriculum renewal and development with industry trends. Expand field experience opportunities for students. Use technology to enhance effectiveness of teaching and learning. Related Strategies Align curriculum renewal and development with industry trends. Expand field experience opportunities for students. Use technology to enhance effectiveness of teaching and learning.
Key Activities Planned Accomplishments
Provide training on program review processes. Implement the revised annual and comprehensive program reviews Build a state-of-the-art library at Progress Campus Ensure that CE offers up-to-date, relevant curriculum and courses Program review workshops offered to faculty and academic staff. ARQ implemented for all programs and comprehensive review implemented for 11 programs New Progress Library design work completed construction to begin in 200809 contingent upon financing Revise 20 of continuing education ancillary curricula in line with the current interests of students and employers
14
Learning excellence Applied Research and
Innovation
One of the key objectives of Centennial College is to further build innovation and applied research capacity across all schools and programs. Centennials Applied Research and Innovation Centre has an excellent track record of responding to employers and community needs through relevant applied research. Including students in research activity facilitates real-world training and produces the highly skilled workforce essential for future innovation and prosperity. The College aims to accelerate its applied research and innovation activities to support learning for all address the priorities of local private and public employers modify curriculum to take account of employer need for employees who can adapt to and add value to an innovative workplace improve teaching techniques to assure effective access and learning for students, especially those from underrepresented groups. The Applied Research and Innovation Centre fulfils this mandate by administrating the internal Applied Research Fellowship Fund, and obtaining external funding from two primary sources the Ministry of Research and Innovation (MRI) and Colleges Ontario Network for Industry Innovation (CONII), which awards seed funds to faculty and staff for applied research projects for proof of concept, prototyping, testing and design, and innovations in teaching and learning. Another key objective is to secure Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) eligibility and funding for the Colleges Emergency Preparedness research project. This project comprises a multi-year research program to develop, test and enhance innovative technologies in emergency preparedness and public safety in Canada and to promote economic growth for allied industries. The proposed work leverages Centennials reputation as a centre of expertise in innovation, technology and process management for critical events, major disasters and emergencies. One of the key objectives of Centennial College is to further build innovation and applied research capacity across all schools and programs. Centennials Applied Research and Innovation Centre has an excellent track record of responding to employers and community needs through relevant applied research. Including students in research activity facilitates real-world training and produces the highly skilled workforce essential for future innovation and prosperity. The College aims to accelerate its applied research and innovation activities to support learning for all address the priorities of local private and public employers modify curriculum to take account of employer need for employees who can adapt to and add value to an innovative workplace improve teaching techniques to assure effective access and learning for students, especially those from underrepresented groups. The Applied Research and Innovation Centre fulfils this mandate by administrating the internal Applied Research Fellowship Fund, and obtaining external funding from two primary sources the Ministry of Research and Innovation (MRI) and Colleges Ontario Network for Industry Innovation (CONII), which awards seed funds to faculty and staff for applied research projects for proof of concept, prototyping, testing and design, and innovations in teaching and learning. Another key objective is to secure Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) eligibility and funding for the Colleges Emergency Preparedness research project. This project comprises a multi-year research program to develop, test and enhance innovative technologies in emergency preparedness and public safety in Canada and to promote economic growth for allied industries. The proposed work leverages Centennials reputation as a centre of expertise in innovation, technology and process management for critical events, major disasters and emergencies.
Related Strategies Expand applied research capacity across the college to enrich teaching and learning and to advance local and regional economic and social prosperity through applied, market-driven research, development and commercialization. Related Strategies Expand applied research capacity across the college to enrich teaching and learning and to advance local and regional economic and social prosperity through applied, market-driven research, development and commercialization.
Key Activities Planned Accomplishments
Create an applied research portal and engage faculty in applied research Support innovations in teaching and learning, applied degrees, articulation agreements, certification and accreditation. Investigate individual and collaborative applied research opportunities with industry and government Further establish Centennial's reputation for excellence in applied research and innovation to local and regional industry Applied research portal finished by winter 2008. College-wide annual applied research symposium conducted in May 2008 Applied research documentation and online learning modules created for the use of faculty and staff. Applied Research Fellowship Program expanded across the College. NSERC eligibility and research funding obtained. Four applied research collaborations developed with small- and medium-sized enterprises in 2007-08
15
Learning excellence Increase program choice and
availability
We aim to increase the program choices available to our applicants in order to meet the demands of industry and the ever-changing workplace. We will launch seven new programs in fall 2008. We are working on five additional programs that may be launched this or next academic year, depending on when their development is completed. The School of Engineering Technology and Applied Science (SETAS) is exploring opportunities for new apprenticeship programs for Electrician, Millwright, Machine Builder Integrator, and Air Conditioning and Heating Technician. Likewise, the School of Transportation (SOT) plans to increase the breadth of its apprenticeship training offerings with a new Power Lift Technician Apprenticeship program. We have six joint-degree programs with the University of Toronto Scarborough and a joint Nursing B.Sc. program with Ryerson University, all running successfully. We plan to expand the scope of our collaboration with these two universities by exploring further joint program opportunities. The School of Business is working on creating a common curriculum for students in the first three semesters to give them a wider program selection at the conclusion of the third semester. We aim to increase the program choices available to our applicants in order to meet the demands of industry and the ever-changing workplace. We will launch seven new programs in fall 2008. We are working on five additional programs that may be launched this or next academic year, depending on when their development is completed. The School of Engineering Technology and Applied Science (SETAS) is exploring opportunities for new apprenticeship programs for Electrician, Millwright, Machine Builder Integrator, and Air Conditioning and Heating Technician. Likewise, the School of Transportation (SOT) plans to increase the breadth of its apprenticeship training offerings with a new Power Lift Technician Apprenticeship program. We have six joint-degree programs with the University of Toronto Scarborough and a joint Nursing B.Sc. program with Ryerson University, all running successfully. We plan to expand the scope of our collaboration with these two universities by exploring further joint program opportunities. The School of Business is working on creating a common curriculum for students in the first three semesters to give them a wider program selection at the conclusion of the third semester.
Related Strategies Increase the breadth of apprenticeship training offerings. Increase the choice of joint programs and articulations with post-secondary institutions and professional associations. Expand program offerings in high-demand, career-specific areas. Related Strategies Increase the breadth of apprenticeship training offerings. Increase the choice of joint programs and articulations with post-secondary institutions and professional associations. Expand program offerings in high-demand, career-specific areas.
Key Activities Planned Accomplishments
Develop new programs that meet student interest and industry demand Increase the breadth of apprenticeship training offerings Explore new joint program opportunities with University of Toronto Scarborough and Ryerson University Create common curriculum for School of Business students in the first three semesters to provide the maximum number of program selection choices The following post-secondary programs launched Esthetician Food and Beverage Hotel and Resort Management Festival, Event and Conference Management Culture and Heritage Advertising Media Management and Sports Journalism Viability explored and recommendations prepared for the launch of new apprenticeship programs in SETAS and SOT New joint program proposals were developed with University of Toronto Scarborough and Ryerson University Common curriculum built in the Business-Management, Accounting-Financial Services, and Legal Studies-Office Administration clusters
16
Learning excellence Prepare Centennial students
for global workplace
The world is transforming into one global workplace. One of our goals is to prepare our students for work in this incredibly diverse environment. We have satellite campuses in India and China that enable international students to begin their Centennial education in their home country and transfer to Toronto for the second and/or third year of their program. We continue to internationalize the curriculum here at home by incorporating international case studies and assignments and discussions on international issues, and by stressing global citizenship and social justice principles. We continue to expand our collaboration with overseas educational institutions. This year we aim to sign at least three more articulation agreements with international institutions and two more co-operation agreements with international universities. By establishing partnerships with international agencies and organizations, we will seek to increase the number of domestic students who gain international co-op experience this year. Centennial students who prefer a short- or long-term overseas work experience will have the opportunity to have web conferences with overseas employers for possible work placements. One way to ensure acceptance of Centennial students in the global workplace is to obtain program accreditation from internationally recognized accrediting agencies and bodies. To this end, the college will obtain worldwide accreditation through the Canadian Technology Accreditation Board for our technology programs. The world is transforming into one global workplace. One of our goals is to prepare our students for work in this incredibly diverse environment. We have satellite campuses in India and China that enable international students to begin their Centennial education in their home country and transfer to Toronto for the second and/or third year of their program. We continue to internationalize the curriculum here at home by incorporating international case studies and assignments and discussions on international issues, and by stressing global citizenship and social justice principles. We continue to expand our collaboration with overseas educational institutions. This year we aim to sign at least three more articulation agreements with international institutions and two more co-operation agreements with international universities. By establishing partnerships with international agencies and organizations, we will seek to increase the number of domestic students who gain international co-op experience this year. Centennial students who prefer a short- or long-term overseas work experience will have the opportunity to have web conferences with overseas employers for possible work placements. One way to ensure acceptance of Centennial students in the global workplace is to obtain program accreditation from internationally recognized accrediting agencies and bodies. To this end, the college will obtain worldwide accreditation through the Canadian Technology Accreditation Board for our technology programs.
Related Strategies Increase opportunities for international students to study at Centennial and for Centennial students to study abroad. Utilize Centennial faculty members and management in international projects to enhance their diversity awareness and to provide them with professional development opportunities Related Strategies Increase opportunities for international students to study at Centennial and for Centennial students to study abroad. Utilize Centennial faculty members and management in international projects to enhance their diversity awareness and to provide them with professional development opportunities
Key Activities Planned Accomplishments
Accelerate internationalization of the curriculum Increase availability of articulation agreements with overseas institutions Develop overseas industry partnerships to grow the number of co-op and work experience opportunities Use web conference technology to facilitate communication between Centennial students and overseas employers Support Centennial programs in obtaining internationally recognized accreditations International content included in academic programs At least three new international articulation and two new cooperation agreements developed Number of domestic students with international co-op work experience increased Web conference service offered to our students to communicate with overseas employers Worldwide accreditation obtained through the Canadian Technology Accreditation Board for technology programs
17
Access and student success Provide opportunities
for under-represented students
Centennial College is located in the urban community of Scarborough, which has a large number of recent arrivals to Canada, low-income families and communities at risk. Our students reflect that demographic. We believe we have a special responsibility to ensure that people from these communities have both access to college education and opportunities to succeed once they are enrolled. Our Helping Youth Pursue Education (HYPE) project won the Colleges Ontario award last year. This program reaches out to youth from several at risk Scarborough neighbourhoods and helps familiarize them with post-secondary education through free summer courses. Graduates of the HYPE program are encouraged to enrol in post-secondary programs in the following fall semester. In summer 2007, 93 students graduated from the HYPE program, of which 20 subsequently enrolled in Centennial programs. We provide bursaries to these HYPE graduates for the duration of their education at Centennial. Almost 44 of our students identify themselves as First Generation (FG) students the first people in their family to receive a Canadian post-secondary education. We have a three-pronged strategy to support FG students, consisting of outreach, on-campus learning experiences, and advisement and ongoing support. We have received additional funding from the government, which we plan to use to increase the number of FG applicants, registrants, students and graduates. Centennial does not have a significant Aboriginal student population at present. However, we continuously explore opportunities to expand our outreach to this community and have developed an action plan to understand and address their educational needs. Early intervention strategies to advise and counsel students who are experiencing academic difficulties are an important component of our overall strategy to provide support for students from under-represented groups. We track the educational successes of the students with learning disabilities based on self-disclosure. Centennial College is located in the urban community of Scarborough, which has a large number of recent arrivals to Canada, low-income families and communities at risk. Our students reflect that demographic. We believe we have a special responsibility to ensure that people from these communities have both access to college education and opportunities to succeed once they are enrolled. Our Helping Youth Pursue Education (HYPE) project won the Colleges Ontario award last year. This program reaches out to youth from several at risk Scarborough neighbourhoods and helps familiarize them with post-secondary education through free summer courses. Graduates of the HYPE program are encouraged to enrol in post-secondary programs in the following fall semester. In summer 2007, 93 students graduated from the HYPE program, of which 20 subsequently enrolled in Centennial programs. We provide bursaries to these HYPE graduates for the duration of their education at Centennial. Almost 44 of our students identify themselves as First Generation (FG) students the first people in their family to receive a Canadian post-secondary education. We have a three-pronged strategy to support FG students, consisting of outreach, on-campus learning experiences, and advisement and ongoing support. We have received additional funding from the government, which we plan to use to increase the number of FG applicants, registrants, students and graduates. Centennial does not have a significant Aboriginal student population at present. However, we continuously explore opportunities to expand our outreach to this community and have developed an action plan to understand and address their educational needs. Early intervention strategies to advise and counsel students who are experiencing academic difficulties are an important component of our overall strategy to provide support for students from under-represented groups. We track the educational successes of the students with learning disabilities based on self-disclosure.
Related Strategies Enhance community relations to support Centennials diverse population. Develop relationships with high schools to encourage pathways for those students who might not otherwise enter post-secondary education. Related Strategies Enhance community relations to support Centennials diverse population. Develop relationships with high schools to encourage pathways for those students who might not otherwise enter post-secondary education.
Key Activities Planned Accomplishments
Expand HYPE program by enrolling more students in summer courses Continue to implement the FG students project. Implement the Aboriginal students action plan Develop early intervention strategies for students with learning disabilities HYPE program participation increased to at least 120 students in summer 2008 Number of FG applicants, registrants, students and graduates increased Local Aboriginal communities contacted and consulted to develop strategies to support their educational needs Educational success of students with learning disabilities tracked and improved
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Access and student success Provide opportunities
for new immigrants
Centennial offers Internationally Trained Immigrants (ITIs) a variety of specially designed bridging and fast-track programs and advises them on making informed program and career choices. An important concern for immigrants planning to access post-secondary education is their English language skills. Last year we completed an extensive review of our English course curriculum and delivery approaches. We benchmarked a range of program reading materials and delivery tools using the Canadian Language Benchmarks to accurately determine the level of language proficiency students require to succeed. This allowed us to create a new entry-level English curriculum for the college programs. By fall 2008, the majority of our programs will have a newly-developed English course as the entry-level course on their model routes. The Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration has agreed to continue to fund the implementation of the Colleges Integrating Immigrants to Employment (CIITE) project for another year. CIITE, a multi-year project led by three Ontario colleges including Centennial, focuses on systemic changes within the Ontario college system that will improve pathways from pre-entry through to transition to employment for ITIs. Centennial will continue to be a leading participant in this project. Being aware of the opportunities that articulation agreements offer to our students, we have increased the number of articulation agreements with outside bodies to allow newcomers to Canada to obtain industry-recognized certification through Continuing Education (CE) courses. We aim to increase the number of new comers who are enrolled in CE courses to obtain diplomas and certifications. We continue to launch new fast track and bridging programs. In addition to the eight existing technology programs, we are making additional fast track programs available to ITIs under the Fast Track to Technology Occupations (FTTO) program. Once our technology programs are accredited by the Canadian Technology Accreditation Board, the graduates from these programs will obtain professional designations that are recognized nation-wide. Centennial offers Internationally Trained Immigrants (ITIs) a variety of specially designed bridging and fast-track programs and advises them on making informed program and career choices. An important concern for immigrants planning to access post-secondary education is their English language skills. Last year we completed an extensive review of our English course curriculum and delivery approaches. We benchmarked a range of program reading materials and delivery tools using the Canadian Language Benchmarks to accurately determine the level of language proficiency students require to succeed. This allowed us to create a new entry-level English curriculum for the college programs. By fall 2008, the majority of our programs will have a newly-developed English course as the entry-level course on their model routes. The Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration has agreed to continue to fund the implementation of the Colleges Integrating Immigrants to Employment (CIITE) project for another year. CIITE, a multi-year project led by three Ontario colleges including Centennial, focuses on systemic changes within the Ontario college system that will improve pathways from pre-entry through to transition to employment for ITIs. Centennial will continue to be a leading participant in this project. Being aware of the opportunities that articulation agreements offer to our students, we have increased the number of articulation agreements with outside bodies to allow newcomers to Canada to obtain industry-recognized certification through Continuing Education (CE) courses. We aim to increase the number of new comers who are enrolled in CE courses to obtain diplomas and certifications. We continue to launch new fast track and bridging programs. In addition to the eight existing technology programs, we are making additional fast track programs available to ITIs under the Fast Track to Technology Occupations (FTTO) program. Once our technology programs are accredited by the Canadian Technology Accreditation Board, the graduates from these programs will obtain professional designations that are recognized nation-wide.
Related Strategies Provide advice and counselling to newcomers entering Centennial Support and promote transfer credit recognition Develop occupation-specific ESL courses and programs Increase availability of co-op programs and on-campus employment to help new immigrant students gain Canadian work experience Related Strategies Provide advice and counselling to newcomers entering Centennial Support and promote transfer credit recognition Develop occupation-specific ESL courses and programs Increase availability of co-op programs and on-campus employment to help new immigrant students gain Canadian work experience
Key Activities Planned Accomplishments
Enhance core English curriculum to include a wider range of communication skills development Continue to participate in CIITE project Increase the number of articulation agreements with outside bodies to allow ITIs to obtain certification through CE courses Continue to launch fast track/bridging programs. Implement the FTTO program New English course outlines and curriculum made available for fall 2008 implementation CIITE transfer credit project objectives achieved Number of new Canadians taking CE courses increased Software Systems Degree and Massage Therapy bridging programs launched. Accreditation of technology programs completed
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Access and student success Improve student success
Since its inception in September 2006, the Advisement Centre has helped approximately 1,500 applicants and students from a variety of groups, including FG students and ITIs. One of our objectives is to increase retention in our programs. Through the student withdrawal survey introduced by the Advisement Centre, we plan to gain an enhanced insight into the reasons for student attrition and use it to develop strategies to help students to persist to graduation. Some of our schools have initiated pilot projects to improve student success. The School of Advancement (SOA) employs two part-time academic advisors to provide more front line advising for new students seeking guidance. The School of Community and Health Studies (SCHS) and the School of Communications, Media and Design have introduced pilot mentoring programs in several of their programs. We plan to enhance the interview skills of students preparing for their co-op placement by having them participate in an interview simulation exercise. We have designed special student success programs for international students. These include a learning styles inventory in the orientation activity, a buddy system call service for new international students and a pilot peer ambassador program in the School of Business. We have also implemented new services, such as airport pick-up, help with student visa renewals and work visa applications, organization of cultural activities, and provision of medical and religious information. With the development of new Key Performance Indicators strategies to improve student participation, the college intends to gather constructive feedback from its student body to improve student satisfaction and success. Since its inception in September 2006, the Advisement Centre has helped approximately 1,500 applicants and students from a variety of groups, including FG students and ITIs. One of our objectives is to increase retention in our programs. Through the student withdrawal survey introduced by the Advisement Centre, we plan to gain an enhanced insight into the reasons for student attrition and use it to develop strategies to help students to persist to graduation. Some of our schools have initiated pilot projects to improve student success. The School of Advancement (SOA) employs two part-time academic advisors to provide more front line advising for new students seeking guidance. The School of Community and Health Studies (SCHS) and the School of Communications, Media and Design have introduced pilot mentoring programs in several of their programs. We plan to enhance the interview skills of students preparing for their co-op placement by having them participate in an interview simulation exercise. We have designed special student success programs for international students. These include a learning styles inventory in the orientation activity, a buddy system call service for new international students and a pilot peer ambassador program in the School of Business. We have also implemented new services, such as airport pick-up, help with student visa renewals and work visa applications, organization of cultural activities, and provision of medical and religious information. With the development of new Key Performance Indicators strategies to improve student participation, the college intends to gather constructive feedback from its student body to improve student satisfaction and success.
Related Strategies Improve effectiveness of English language skills assessment and provide students with adequate support Increase program admission, transfer and graduation options Introduce early intervention programs Develop study methods and practices that address the special needs of our diverse students Strengthen curriculum for improved workplace preparation of students Related Strategies Improve effectiveness of English language skills assessment and provide students with adequate support Increase program admission, transfer and graduation options Introduce early intervention programs Develop study methods and practices that address the special needs of our diverse students Strengthen curriculum for improved workplace preparation of students
Key Activities Planned Accomplishments
Reduce student withdrawal from programs by understanding and addressing the underlying reasons Support student success in academic schools Support international student achievements through new success initiatives and services Gather feedback from Centennial student body to enhance academic and campus environment Exit interview process begun. Results compiled and tabulated. Reasons for student withdrawal analyzed Pilot projects conducted in SOA, SCHS and co-op placement. Findings reported and acted upon Implemented new international student success initiatives and services listed above. International student retention increased Improved student and graduate satisfaction
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Access and student success Help relieve financial
strain on students
With the ever-increasing financial burden on todays students, Centennial remains committed to providing financial support to its students to assist them in obtaining post-secondary education. Each year, we further help relieve financial strain on students by expanding our scholarship opportunities, either from the College Endowment Fund or directly from industry through our well-established relationships. We distribute targeted bursaries to FG students, students with disabilities, single parent students, and students from at risk communities. In addition, we provide other bursaries to our students, including Book Bursary, Applied Degree and Bachelor of Science Tuition Bursary, Child Maintenance Bursary, Women in Skilled Trades Bursary and CE and Part-time Day General Bursary. A new bursary targeting Aboriginal students will be introduced in 200809. An integral component of Centennials involvement in at risk community programs is the provision of bursary support for youths wishing to obtain post-secondary education by attending Centennial. In that regard, we continue to offer bursaries to HYPE program graduates and FG students who enrol in Centennial programs. We provide Student Access Guarantee (SAG) to eligible students and provide SAG bursaries automatically, based on SAG guidelines and without waiting for applications from students. We expect to undertake three disbursements of SAG in 200809. We award the School of Transportation Scholarship to high school students pursuing post-secondary education. The School of Hospitality, Culture and Tourism (SHCT) continues to liaise with industry in the GTA to secure more scholarship funds for students. Two such industry organizations are the Canadian Hospitality Foundation and the Ontario Hospitality Institute. We plan to facilitate online application access to all Centennial bursaries next year. In this way, we aim to enhance effectiveness of the financial aid process and to ensure timely distribution of resources in 2007-08. With the ever-increasing financial burden on todays students, Centennial remains committed to providing financial support to its students to assist them in obtaining post-secondary education. Each year, we further help relieve financial strain on students by expanding our scholarship opportunities, either from the College Endowment Fund or directly from industry through our well-established relationships. We distribute targeted bursaries to FG students, students with disabilities, single parent students, and students from at risk communities. In addition, we provide other bursaries to our students, including Book Bursary, Applied Degree and Bachelor of Science Tuition Bursary, Child Maintenance Bursary, Women in Skilled Trades Bursary and CE and Part-time Day General Bursary. A new bursary targeting Aboriginal students will be introduced in 200809. An integral component of Centennials involvement in at risk community programs is the provision of bursary support for youths wishing to obtain post-secondary education by attending Centennial. In that regard, we continue to offer bursaries to HYPE program graduates and FG students who enrol in Centennial programs. We provide Student Access Guarantee (SAG) to eligible students and provide SAG bursaries automatically, based on SAG guidelines and without waiting for applications from students. We expect to undertake three disbursements of SAG in 200809. We award the School of Transportation Scholarship to high school students pursuing post-secondary education. The School of Hospitality, Culture and Tourism (SHCT) continues to liaise with industry in the GTA to secure more scholarship funds for students. Two such industry organizations are the Canadian Hospitality Foundation and the Ontario Hospitality Institute. We plan to facilitate online application access to all Centennial bursaries next year. In this way, we aim to enhance effectiveness of the financial aid process and to ensure timely distribution of resources in 2007-08.
Related Strategies Maximize external bursary and scholarship opportunities for students Develop bursaries that meet the special needs of our diverse students Enhance effectiveness of financial aid processes to ensure timely distribution of resources Related Strategies Maximize external bursary and scholarship opportunities for students Develop bursaries that meet the special needs of our diverse students Enhance effectiveness of financial aid processes to ensure timely distribution of resources
Key Activities Planned Accomplishments
Help eliminate financial barriers for under-represented students thorough targeted bursaries Continue to implement SAG for eligible students Increase Centennial Endowment Fund and direct bursary opportunities from external institutions and communities Enhance efficiency of bursary distribution for students Aboriginal Students Bursary introduced. HYPE and First Generation Student Bursaries increased Ensured SAG benefits available to all eligible students Endowment fund increased by 15. Amount of direct bursaries increased by 10 Online bursary application and distribution enabled
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Student college experience Enhance student
experience
Construction of a new Athletics and Wellness Centre (AWC), fun
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