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Greek Drama

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Greek Drama Religious Festivals In honor of Dionysus god of wine, food, fertility Dionysia--city where festival was held in the spring Festival lasted for 4 days ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Greek Drama


1
Greek Drama
2
Religious Festivals
  • In honor of Dionysus god of wine, food,
    fertility
  • Dionysia--city where festival was held in the
    spring
  • Festival lasted for 4 days ended with awards
    given to best plays.
  • Competitive dances, songs and choral hymns
    performed to honor the gods, esp. Dionysus
  • Choric storytelling evolves into re-enactments of
    legends of Greek culture

3
Greek Drama
  • The Ancient Greeks took their entertainment
    very seriously and used drama as a way of
    investigating the world they lived in, and what
    it meant to be human.

4
Greek Drama
  • Wealthy citizens would sponsor plays by paying a
    tax called the choregia.
  • Many hoped the success of the play they sponsored
    would provide them with a way into politics.

5
Greek Drama
  • The three genres of drama were comedy, satyr
    plays, and most important of all, tragedy.

6
Comedy
  • Mainly satirical and mocked men in power for
    their vanity and foolishness.

7
Tragedy
  • Themes -- love, loss, pride, the abuse of power
    and the fraught relationships between men and
    gods.
  • Main protagonist commits some terrible crime
    without realizing how foolish and arrogant he has
    been. Then, as he slowly realizes his error, the
    world crumbles around him.
  • The three great playwrights of tragedy were
    Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides.

8
Tragedy
  • Aristotle argued that tragedy cleansed the heart
    through pity and terror, purging us of our petty
    concerns and worries by making us aware that
    there can be nobility in suffering. He called
    this experience 'catharsis'.

9
Satyr Plays
  • Short plays performed between the acts of
    tragedies that made fun of the plight of the
    tragedy's characters. The satyrs were mythical
    half-human, half-goat figures and actors in these
    plays wore large phalluses for comic effect.

10
Thespis
  • Father of Drama/First Actor
  • astounded audiences by leaping on to the back of
    a wooden cart and reciting poetry as if he was
    the characters whose lines he was reading
  • Thespian

11
First Playwrights
  • Aeschylus introduced a second actor, creating
    DIALOGUE
  • Sophocles introduced a third actor, as seen in
    Oedipus Rex, which allows for dramatic complexity.

12
Structure of the Theater
13
Classic Greek Theatre
  • Theatron
  • Seeing place where audience sat. Held up to
    20,000 people.
  • Orchestra
  • Circular dancing place where actors and chorus
    performed
  • Thymele
  • Altar to Dionysus, center of orchestra

14
Classic Greek Theatre
  • Skene
  • Building used as dressing room
  • Proskenion
  • Façade of the skene building which served as
    backdrop
  • Parados
  • Entrance to the theatre used by chorus audience

15
Actors Acting
  • A play could have many characters but had to be
    divided among three actors
  • Unlimited number of extras or mutes. Stage could
    have a dozen or more soldiers or village maidens
    without violating the rule of three
  • All roles were played by men

16
Costumes Masks
  • Long flowing robes
  • Symbolically colored
  • High boots, often with raised soles
  • Larger than life masks
  • Made of linen, wood, and/or cork
  • Exaggerated features

17
MasksPersona
  • Male vs. female
  • Young vs. old
  • Grief stricken vs. hopeful
  • The open mouth on the mask increased the
    resonance of the actors voice

18
Function of the Chorus
  • Serve as a barometer of popular opinion
  • Add beauty (theatrical effectiveness) through
    song dance
  • Give background information
  • Divide action offer reflections on events
  • Questions, advises, expresses opinionsusually
    through chorus leader

19
Conventions
  • Unities
  • Actionsimple plot
  • Timea single day
  • Placeone scene throughout the entire play

Temple at Delphi
20
Conventions
  • Messenger
  • Tells news happening away from the scene
  • Reports acts of violence not allowed to be seen
  • Limitations
  • Continuous presence of the chorus
  • No intermissions continuous flow of action and
    choral odes
  • No lighting or curtains

21
Tragic Hero
  • Tragic FlawHubris
  • Excessive Pride arrogance
  • Fatal errors in judgment which contributes to the
    downfall
  • Tragic Realization
  • Accepts responsibility for the outcome
  • Perceives before the fall how he/she has
    contributed to his/her own destruction

22
Irony
  • The awarenessby the author, character, or
    readerof a contrast or an incongruity between
    appearance and reality
  • Verbal Irony
  • Words that appear to mean one thing really mean
    the opposite

23
Irony
  • Dramatic irony
  • What appears true to a character is not what the
    audience or reader knows to be true
  • Situational Irony
  • What appears likely to happen is not what
    actually happens

24
Paradox
  • A statement or a situation that at first seems
    impossible or self-contradictory but that may
    actually be true, either in fact or in the
    figurative sense.

25
Deus ex machina
  • 'dA-s-"eks-'mä-ki-n
  • Function noun
  • Etymology New Latin, a god from a machine,
    translation of Greek theos ek mEchanEsDate 1697
  • 1 a god introduced by means of a crane in
    ancient Greek and Roman drama to decide the final
    outcome
  • 2 a person or thing (as in fiction or drama)
    that appears or is introduced suddenly and
    unexpectedly and provides a contrived solution to
    an apparently insoluble difficulty

26
Archetype
  • A basic model from which copies are made a
    prototype
  • An original pattern
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