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St.Helens Plan Performance Report Quarter 2 2014/15 September 2014

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Title: St.Helens Plan Performance Report Quarter 2 2014/15 September 2014


1
St.Helens Plan Performance Report Quarter 2
2014/15September 2014
2
Contents
Page Introduction 3 Overall Summary of
Performance 4 Performance Information by Theme
Improving Peoples Lives Healthy and Active
5 Skilled and Educated 8 Independent and
Empowered

11 Creating a
Better Place Safer and Stronger


15 Cleaner, Greener and
Accessible

19 Thriving, Vibrant and
Competitive

22
3
Introduction
  • This is the St.Helens Plan Performance Report for
    the 2nd Quarter 2014-15. The purpose of the
    report is to monitor progress against the
    delivery of the priorities and performance
    measures contained in the St.Helens Plan 2014-17.
     
  • The agreed priorities and associated performance
    measures are based on the twin themes of People
    and Place.
  • The report contains
  • An overview of the performance of indicators
    contained within the St.Helens Plan, examining
    progress against target and improvement over
    time.
  • A summary statement for each of the 6 priority
    areas, outlining significant issues around
    service delivery, be it notable performance,
    challenges, concerns, and key action being
    undertaken to improve delivery or performance.
  • A table showing the overall performance of
    indicators for each of the 6 priority areas.
  • Contributions to the narrative sections of this
    report are welcomed from all partners.
    Contributions can be sent at the end of each
    quarter to patriciaregan_at_sthelens.gov.uk
  • Note on performance analysis
  • Direction of performance is determined
    individually for each PI, identifying whether
    performance has improved ?, remained the same ?,
    or worsened ? relative to the degree of variance
    from target in the current reporting period
    compared to the period when data was last
    available, be it monthly, quarterly or annually.
  • Where reference is provided to the comparative
    quartile performance of an indicator, the data
    used to calculate the quartile position is the
    latest available for the relevant family /
    nearest neighbour group. Requests for further
    information in relation to comparative
    performance can be made to patriciaregan_at_sthelens.
    gov.uk
  • Further details of all our indicators are
    available in the Performance Indicator Database
    2014/15.

4
Overall Summary of Performance
The following pie charts show the overall
performance and direction of travel of all the
performance indicators contained in the St.Helens
Plan 2014-17 as key measures of success. There
are a total of 48 performance indicators
contained within the Plan and details of the
individual indicator performance can be found in
the Councils Performance Indicator Database
2014/15.
PIs on target 29 PIs off target 19
At the end of September 2014, 29, or 60, of
performance indicators were on or above target.
There was 1 performance indicator where
direction of travel could not be assessed as
there was no previous data to compare against.
This indicator has been excluded from the
calculations in the above chart. Of the 47
indicators where it is possible to assess
direction of travel, 20 or 43, showed
improvement.
5
Improving Peoples Lives - Healthy Active
Summary

The following St. Helens Plan priorities contribute to this aim
Improving health and reducing health inequalities so that local people live longer, free from long term health problems Improving the health and wellbeing of children and young people Encouraging participation in sport, physical activity and the arts to promote physical and mental wellbeing
  • In Quarter 2 the Children and Families Bill 2014
    introduced reforms to Special Education Needs
    (SEN) statements which from 1st September 2014
    were replaced by Education, Health and Care (EHC)
    plans. These reforms require partners to consider
    changing the way they commission services for
    children and young people with additional and/or
    complex needs, resulting in the establishment of
    an Integrated Children Commissioning Team, which
    sits within the wider Integrated Childrens
    Health Team.
  • The SEN sub group has taken a lead on the
    response to the reform programme, with the Task
    Group including Members, Council Officers,
    St.Helens CCG, Schools, the Voluntary and
    Community Sector and Health providers. A
    significant amount of work has been undertaken in
    order to provide a more joined-up and responsive
    service for children and young people with
    special educational needs and disability. Key new
    developments include
  • A transition plan to manage the process of
    transferring children and young people with
    Statements and young people receiving support as
    a result of a Learning Difficulty Assessment
    (LDA) to EHC Plans.
  • A Local Offer for children and young people
    with SEN has been developed and is available at
    www.sthelens.gov.uk/senlocaloffer. This is a key
    component of the reform programme as it gives
    children, young people and their families a
    greater understanding and means of accessing the
    services and support available. It gives
    information about the universal, targeted and
    specialist support services that are available
    and will enable service users to exercise greater
    choice and control of the services they access to
    meet their needs. An EHC plan template has been
    developed to enable the child/young person and
    carer to play an active role in developing the
    plan and expressing the views, interests and
    aspirations of the child or young person. The EHC
    plan will offer holistic support by bringing
    together education, health and social care
    provision based upon the needs of the individual.
  • Work to improve the health of local people and
    reduce health inequalities is on-going and
    includes
  • As part of the Health Wellbeing Strategy,
    close work between midwives and the smoke-free
    service has helped to reduce the number of women
  • smoking at time of delivery. The scheme has
    been expanded for 2014/15 and brings significant
    health benefits throughout life for mothers and
    babies.
  • The 2014 Joint Strategic Needs Assessment was
    completed and presented to the Health and
    Wellbeing Board and CCG Governing Body for
    approval.
  • The Falls Prevention Strategy 2014-17 was
    approved by the Health and Wellbeing Board and
    will be included as a related document in the
    Better Care
  • Fund (BCF) Plan. The strategy, whilst led by
    Public Health, is the result of considerable
    partnership work from across the Council and the
    CCG.
  • Healthy Balance, the St.Helens Healthy Weight
    Strategy, was completed to provide a strategic
    framework in which to redesign and recommission
    weight
  • management services. Tackling obesity is one
    of the 8 priorities within the St.Helens Health
    Wellbeing Strategy.
  • The Health Improvement Team produced their first
    e-newsletter which aims to inform and update the
    local community and partners about the work they
  • are doing and how to get involved. The
    interactive e-zine is sent out to consenting
    clients across all services, partners, Council
    staff and to GP surgeries.
  • Recipients are encouraged to forward the e-zine
    to others, and add their email addresses to the
    growing list. Feedback so far has been positive.

6
Improving Peoples Lives - Healthy Active
Summary continued
  • whose role it is to provide help directly to
    families of children and young people with SEN
    going through the EHC plan assessment and
    planning
  • process. Government funding for Independent
    Supporters has been secured until March 2016.
  • The evaluation of St Helens Educational
    Psychology Service to schools (2013-14) was
    completed and identified excellent outcomes
    consistent with the
  • previous 2 years. A high proportion of
    schools (53) returned service evaluations, with
    100 either agreeing or strongly agreeing that
    the service
  • performed to a high standard a sample of
    parent and child satisfaction questionnaires
    identified an exceptionally high level of service
    satisfaction.
  • The Teenage Advice Zone (TAZ) Team funded
    Chelseas Choice, a drama production by Alter
    Ego, to raise awareness of child sexual
    exploitation (CSE). The play was endorsed by the
    National Working Group for CSE and has been seen
    by over 34,000 young people and hundreds of
    professionals. It has proven highly effective in
    raising awareness of healthy relationships,
    promoting safe Internet use, identifying risky
    situations, raising awareness of grooming and
    child sexual exploitation and sign-posting to
    relevant services.
  • The 'One Year On' Child Health event provided an
    opportunity for strategic decision makers to hear
    the progress made in respect of child health
    priorities discussed at the Child Health Summit
    in October 2013 and the young people's conference
    'The Importance of Being Me', held in January
    2014. Also at the event, stakeholders and
    partners had the opportunity to comment on
    current service reviews which are in progress,
    such as the Healthy Child programme, Mental
    Health Tier 2 review, implementation of the SEN
    reforms, Sexual Health review and the Family
    Nurse Partnership (FNP).
  • A review of the Healthy Child Programme looked at
    current practice against local needs and national
    requirements to ensure that children and families
    in St Helens receive the services they need in a
    way that is most acceptable to families and local
    stakeholders. The following services are part of
    the Healthy Child review school nursing, health
    visiting, vision screening, hearing screening and
    breastfeeding support services. To date over 350
    stakeholders, including children, young people
    and parents/carers have been consulted to inform
    a local model of service.
  • Encouraging participation in sport, physical
    activity and the Arts continued to contribute to
    improving health and well-being. Progress this
    Quarter includes
  • Good attendance at most sports centres although
    increased competition from budget gyms has
    reduced overall Go Active membership. A series of
    autumn and winter promotions are being considered
    to increase membership.
  • Promotion of Golf reduced fees for tees during
    the middle part of the day and the introduction
    of promotional offers for the Driving Range at
    targeted times are being considered to increase
    visitor numbers.
  • The application to the Football Foundation for
    500,000 towards the artificial turf pitch and
    changing rooms at Ruskin Drive will be presented
    to the Foundations panel on 29th October and if
    successful the grant will be awarded by the
    Foundations Board at their meeting on 10th
    December.
  • Following the award from Sport England of
    249,000 to support a programme aimed at
    increasing participation, Sports Development has
    appointed 3 part time sports coaches acting as
    Activators to start to deliver the project in
    partnership with local sports clubs.
  • The School Games programme is currently fully
    funded by Sport England and the Department of
    Health but is only confirmed to July 2015. Work
    is underway with SHAPES (St.Helens Association
    for Physical Education and Sport) to identify
    alternative sources of funding to allow this
    highly valued programme of competition and
    training to continue.
  • The Saturday Family Art Club piloted in St Marys
    Market Event Space as part of Heart of Glass was
    extended throughout 2014 due to its success.
    Additionally, Heart of Glass funded the World of
    Glass to provide free family workshops for 4
    weeks over the summer period.
  • The Library Service performed well overall with
    visitor and active membership numbers and the
    number of items borrowed all above target. This
    reflects the strong and improving performance of
    our online service delivery channel, dubbed the
    "14th branch", which recently expanded to include
    a mobile app, and eBooks.

7
Improving Peoples Lives Healthy Active
Performance Overall
3 indicators currently on target 4 indicators not meeting current target
2 indicators performing better compared to previous period 5 indicators performing worse compared to previous period
Indicators showing as on target Current performance against target Availability of Data Direction of Performance Quartile position
Mortality rate, all age, all cause per 100,000 population (male) PH-01 Performance in Q2 is 683.4 which is slighter worse compared to Q1, probably due to natural variation, but a significant improvement from Q2 last year (707.5). Preventative initiatives such as influenza vaccination, smoking cessation, promotion of the alcohol liaison service and the links to Addaction and NHS Health Checks should all help to continue to improve mortality rates in the future. Quarterly Upper middle
Mortality rate, all age, all cause per 100,000 population (female) PH-02 Performance in Q2 is 498.6 which is slighter worse compared to Q1, probably due to natural variation, but a significant improvement from Q2 last year (530.4). Preventative initiatives such as influenza vaccination, smoking cessation, promotion of the alcohol liaison service and the links to Addaction and NHS Health Checks should all help to continue to improve mortality rates in the future. Quarterly Lower middle
Under 18 conception rate per 1000 15-17 year olds (3 year rolling average) PH-04 The rate recorded at Q2 is 45.8 which is the 2013/14 outturn and an improvement on the 2012/13 outturn of 47.2. The latest quarterly data is for Quarter 2 2013 and shows a continuing reduction, with 8 conceptions less compared to the same period in the previous year. The annual outturn data will be published in February 2015. Annual (February) Lower middle
Indicators showing as not meeting target Current performance against target Availability of Data Direction of Performance Quartile position
Number of visits to sports centres and attendance at activities supported by sports development - CC-04 At Q2, 582,130 visits were recorded, which is 2 worse than target and a deterioration from Q1 (-1 against target). Visits to Sports Centres, with the exception of Queens Park, are ahead of target, and activities supported by Sports Development were well attended. The focus is on improving membership numbers to Queens Park and increasing the Swinskool programme in sports centres with pools. Attendance figures for golf were below target , reflecting a national decline, and significantly worse than last year (-6,251). Monthly Not comparable
Number of people quitting smoking PH-03a Performance at Q2 is 160 which is an interim figure as actual data has not yet been received. This reflects the national decline in people accessing stop smoking services, possibly due in part to the use of e-cigarettes instead. However 20 more pharmacies have started to deliver smoking cessation services, which may improve performance in the next two Quarters. Quarterly No comparable data available
of infants being breastfed at 6-8 weeks PH-05 Performance at Q2 is recorded as 19.7, which is worse than Q1 (23). However this represents incomplete data so may improve once all data for Q2 is available. As part of the healthy child programme review, breastfeeding services are being reviewed. Quarterly Bottom
children in reception year who are overweight or obese PH-06 The Q2 figure relates to the 2013/14 outturn of 24.6, which is worse than the 2012/13 outturn (20.5). New data will not be available until December 2014. Annual (December) Bottom
8
Improving Peoples Lives Skilled Educated
Summary

 
The following St. Helens Plan priorities contribute to this aim
Improving the educational attainment of children and young people Improving the skills of local people, particularly families and young people, to enable access to employment
  • As reported in Quarter 1, the Key Stage 2 results
    were excellent, with improvements in Reading,
    Writing and Maths, and were better than national
    averages.
  • At Key Stage 4, provisional results show that our
    performance for 5 A-C GCSEs including English
    and Maths remained more or less static against a
    background of reductions in performance at
    regional and national level. Performance is as
    follows
  • 54.7 of pupils achieved 5A-C or equivalent
    including English and Maths at KS4, against a
    target of 62, compared to 55.5 in 2013. This
    is above the
  • national average of 52.6.
  • 17 of looked after children achieved 5A-C or
    equivalent including English and Maths at KS4,
    against a target of 25, the same as 2013.
  • 18.7 of pupils at the end of KS4 achieved the
    English Baccalaureate, against a target of 25,
    compared to 18 in 2013.
  • A percentage point gap of 30.4 between pupils
    eligible for free school meals and their peers in
    achieving at least 5A-C or equivalent including
    English
  • and Maths at KS4, against a target of 26,
    compared with 27 in 2013.
  • Data recently published from the Early Years
    Foundation Profile shows that 62 of children in
    reception classes in St.Helens reached a Good
    Level of Development at the end of the academic
    year 2013/14. This represents a 5 increase from
    the previous year and is slightly above the
    national average of 60. A Good Level of
    Development is said to have been reached if a
    child attains the Early Learning Goals in
    Personal, Social and Emotional Development,
    Communication and Language, and Physical
    Development, plus Literacy and Mathematics.
    These areas include many of the skills and
    strengths viewed as necessary for 'readiness for
    school'. The Early Years Foundation Profile data
    also showed a narrowing in the gap in attainment
    between the average of the lowest attaining 20
    of children in the borough, compared with the
    median score for the whole cohort, from 38 in
    2012/13 to 36.1 in 2103/14.
  • The focus is now on continuing to improving
    performance of our schools in academic year
    2014/15 and an independent chair of the School
    Improvement Board has now been appointed. It is
    also a priority to improve outcomes and deliver
    improvements in the educational attainment and
    outcomes of looked after children and the
    recruitment of a new Virtual Head is underway to
    facilitate this.
  • Considerable work has also been undertaken to
    ensure that the Partnership is ready to meet the
    requirements of the SEN reform agenda which was
    introduced on a transitional basis from September
    2014. This has included the development of the
    Local Offer and implementing an agreed
    multi-agency format for education, health and
    care (EHC) plans and is explained in more detail
    in the Healthy Active section of this report.
    Parents, carers and children have been
    consulted on the changes through a range of
    events and workshops and training has been
    undertaken on the new Code for all front line
    practitioners.
  • In terms of Ofsted Inspection ratings of our
    Primary Schools there has been an improvement in
    2 schools from Good to Outstanding, and at
    the end of Quarter 2, 18 are graded as
    Outstanding, 30 are graded as Good, 5 are
    Satisfactory/ Requiring Improvement and 1 is
    Inadequate. Amongst the 9 Secondary Schools in
    St.Helens, there has been no change in Ofsted
    ratings since Quarter 1, with only 3 schools
    judged as being good for overall effectiveness.
    The School Improvement Consultant continues to
    work with schools to provide challenge and
    support relating to leadership, management,
    teaching and learning.

9
Improving Peoples Lives Skilled Educated
Summary continued
Following the change in eligibility criteria to
allow 40 of 2 year olds to qualify for Free
Early Education Entitlement (FEEE), plans are in
place to enable parents to apply online for 2
year olds FEEE. This should increase take up and
will also introduce a means of secure electronic
communication from providers to confirm actual
numbers of places taken up in real time rather
than the once per term headcount. The St Helens
figure for young people Not in Employment,
Education or Training (NEET) is 7.7 at the end
of Quarter 2, which is an improvement on 8.73
reported at the same time last year, and better
than the Quarter 2 target of 9.5. The September
Guarantee outturn at 10th September was 98.2 in
Employment, Education and Training for Year 11
(same as in 2013) and 92.7 for Year 12 (against
93.9 in 2013). For the academic year 2013/14
there were 2650 enrolments for Adult Community
Learner (ACL) courses, of which 26 were males
who are usually underrepresented in the adult
learning sector. ACL targets much of its
provision on disadvantaged learners which
resulted in 28 of all enrolments coming from
those living in the top 10 deprived Super Output
Areas and 57 from the 30 most deprived. This
recognises the commitment of the service to work
with the more deprived, and less likely to
engage, members of our community. Achievement
rates in qualifications were increased and,
although final national data will not be released
until December, initial findings suggest success
will be above national averages. Building
capacity and skills in the voluntary community
sector through LOCAL (Local Opportunities for
Community Adult Learning) has been an area of
considerable growth. LOCAL Leaders programmes
delivered training to 120 volunteers to improve
the quality and safety of the services offered
through volunteering. Additionally LOCAL grants
supported groups to offer targeted learning
opportunities to 14 groups including those with
mental health needs and socially isolated sectors
of the community. This was made possible through
strong local partnerships.
10
Improving Peoples Lives Skilled Educated
Performance Overall
5 indicators currently on target 2 indicators not meeting current target
4 indicators performing better compared to previous period 3 indicators performing worse compared to previous period
Indicators showing as on target Current performance against target Availability of Data Direction of Performance Quartile position
of 16-18 year olds who are NEET CYP-02 Performance at Q2 is 7.7, which is better than the target of 9.5 and an improvement compared to Q2 2013 (8.7). However, the Not Known figure is 12.4, which is worse compared to Q2 last year (6.99). Data sharing arrangements between local authorities is now in place which should reduce the Not Known figure substantially from Q3. Monthly Lower middle
children attaining at least the expected level of development in the Early Learning Goals - CYP-05a The 2013/14 outturn shows that 62 reached the expected level of development, which is 5 more than last year and is better than the national average of 60. Also the gap in attainment between the lowest attaining 20 and their peers has narrowed. Work will continue in the coming year to further improve attainment in literacy and maths, whilst still narrowing the attainment gap. Annual (August) Top
pupils achieving level 4 in Reading, Writing Maths at KS2 CYP-06a Provisional outturn data for the 2013/14 academic year is 84, which is an improvement on the validated 2012/13 outturn of 80 and is better than the national average. Validated data should be available in December 2014. Annual (December) Top
of persistent absentee secondary school pupils (15 threshold) CYP-49 Validated data for the 2013/14 academic year is 6.5 and is an improvement compared to last year (8.1). The Education Welfare Service is currently under review and will continue to work towards continuing this downward trend in absenteeism. Validated data for 2014/15 will be available in March 2015. Annual (March) Top
Proportion of population aged 16-64 qualified to at least level 2 or higher- URH-06 The data recorded for Q2 is 68.9, which is the latest data and relates to Jan-Dec 2013. This is on target but is a 0.3 decrease on the previous year. The overall trend over the past few years has been positive although performance remains 1.3 below the NW average. New data will be available in March 2015. Annual (March) Upper middle
Indicator showing as not meeting target Current performance against target Availability of Data Direction of Performance Quartile position
No. LA adult and community learners - CC-03 The 2013/14 academic year outturn of 2650 is worse compared to last year (2816), but still represents a 96 achievement. Performance has been adversely affected by changes in external funding criteria which place greater emphasis on gaining formal qualifications, and this has proven to be less popular with clients of Adult Community Learning. However, new initiatives are being developed that will meet the new criteria and should be of more interest to adult learners. Annual (August) Not comparable
pupils achieving 5 A-C or equivalent, incl. English Maths at KS4 CYP-07 The provisional 2013/14 academic year outturn of 54.7 has missed the target of 62 , is worse than the 2012/13 outturn of 55.5 but is better than the national average of 52.6. This is the first year that students have been affected by DoE reforms to the early exam entry policy and changes to the way achievements are calculated. Annual (January) Lower middle
11
Improving Peoples Lives Independent
Empowered Summary
The following St. Helens Plan priorities contribute to this aim
Working across health and social care to support vulnerable adults to improve their quality of life and to live independently through personalised, accessible and inclusive social services Ensuring that children and vulnerable adults are safe from harm Ensuring that children in care and care leavers achieve their full potential Engaging and meeting the needs of all local young people
  • The Adult Social Care Act 2014 will be
    implemented through a range of statutory changes
    affecting eligibility, funding and prevention
    between now and April 2016. Final statutory
    guidance is available and the required changes
    will be embedded over the next 2 years, with the
    Act impacting on all aspects of receiving,
    providing or commissioning Adult Social Care.
    The focus of phase 1 relates to access to
    services and must be in place by April 2015,
    phase 2 focuses on paying for services and must
    be in place by April 2016. Demand for services
    for both vulnerable adults and their carers is
    likely to increase significantly and the
    Partnership is scoping the cost and capacity
    issues arising from this.
  • The Better Care Fund is a government directive
    that aims to transform local services whilst
    further integrating the health and social care
    sector to benefit
  • local people. St.Helens BCF plan includes a
    commitment to 7 day working, better sharing of
    information and the protection of social care
    services. The
  • plan has been approved and the Council, in
    partnership with St.Helens Clinical Commissioning
    Group, will now move forward to progress
    implementation.
  • Progress on supporting vulnerable adults to
    maintain independent living includes
  • The integrated Continuing Health Care Team has
    cleared the backlog of work and can now focus on
    new referrals to provide a timely response and
  • ensure that care packages are appropriate and
    meet the individuals needs.
  • The integrated Commissioning Team worked on the
    priorities in the joint 5 year commissioning plan
    for health and social care. Projects included the
    joint
  • Falls Strategy 2014/17 a review of the Falls
    Prevention Service (provided by Bridgewater) and
    provision of an enhanced service that has
    exceeded
  • referral targets in its first few months of
    operation and a workshop planned for Quarter 3
    to progress establishing End of Life standards.
  • The integrated Access St.Helens (IASH) Team
    continues to reduce waiting times for
    assessments, ensuring referrals are made to the
    right services. All
  • referrals to the Reablement Service and for
    Carers Community Support are now made through
    IASH.
  • The St Helens Care Homes Project is reducing
    attendance at Accident and Emergency for care
    home residents and raising standards in care
    homes. It
  • received recurrent funding from April 2014 and
    continues to be monitored by the Integrated
    Commissioning Team.
  • The Reablement Service worked with 5 Boroughs
    Partnership to make assessments more accessible
    and help prevent unnecessary duplication for
    clients
  • and staff. The out of hours community support
    worked with the Rapid Response element of IASH to
    avoid client hospitalisation and carer breakdown
    and
  • have supported each other on joint visits,
    responding quickly when a client needs help to
    remain at home.

12
Improving Peoples Lives Independent
Empowered Summary continued
  • Following the review of Day Opportunities, the
    service is now more cost effective, flexible and
    responsive and has contributed to a draft
    Pathways to Adulthood document which aims to
    promote post 16 opportunities and encourage
    long-term planning for adulthood.
  • The refurbishment of Brookfield is due to
    commence in January 2015 and work continues to
    ensure that plans will meet the future needs of
    the Resource Centre and its clients. The Maple
    Unit shows positive results in terms of people
    returning to their own homes following a stay,
    after hospitalisation.
  • At the end of Q2 the number of Looked After
    Children is 6 lower than the corresponding time
    last year, evidencing the focus on improving
    exits from care to achieve long term solutions
    and better outcomes for children. The number of
    referrals has also begun to fall with 1,132
    referrals at the end of Quarter 2 which is 230
    lower than the same period in 2013. There has
    also been a reduction in the number of children
    on a Child Protection Plan from the last
    Quarter, with 239 recorded at Quarter 2, although
    this remains higher than the 192 CP cases in
    Quarter 2 2013.
  •  
  • Supporting and safeguarding vulnerable children
    and improving outcomes for Looked After Children
    remain key priorities and action taken to
    progress this includes
  • The implementation of single assessments for
    childrens social care, as a replacement for
    initial and core assessments, is proving
    successful as it provides greater flexibility for
    assessments to be completed within timescale.
  • The number of children being re-registered on a
    Child Protection Plan has reduced and an audit of
    CP Plans will be undertaken to determine their
    effectiveness.
  • The time between entering care and being placed
    for adoption has decreased, evidencing the
    effectiveness of plans put in place by the Wwish
    Partnership Board.
  • The Early Help and Priority Families teams are
    now in place and, by the end of Quarter 2, 281
    families had made evidenced improvements in line
    with the governments Troubled Families Payment
    by Results outcomes (i.e. improved school
    attendance, reduced reoffending/ASB, progress to
    work). A dual approach is being taken to
    coordinate existing services going into each
    family in a better, more efficient way, to ensure
    a premium service is received by each family, and
    bring in new services (e.g. Home-Start, Starting
    Point), whilst bolstering and re-shaping existing
    services (i.e. Early Help) so unmet need is
    provided for.
  • The Youth Service continues to engage with, and
    meet the needs of, young people. However, it has
    been necessary to review youth service delivery
    to achieve the required budget. As a consequence
    of this review, the number of sessions currently
    available will reduce. Achievements in Q2
    include
  • A hugely popular summer programme based in a
    number of the boroughs parks of note was a
    comprehensive programme of climbing, abseiling,
    archery and mountain biking offered once a week
    in Taylor Park for which a nominal charge was
    levied for the first time and this did not prove
    to be a barrier to participation.
  • Delivery of over 50 sessions each week, although
    following a 60 reduction in budget this will be
    reduced to 21 sessions each week from November.
    The transition to the new programme will take a
    number of months as it requires additional staff
    to be recruited so it will be the New Year before
    all 21 sessions will be operational.

13
Improving Peoples Lives Independent
Empowered Performance Overall
11 indicators currently on target 2 indicators not meeting current target
5 indicators performing better compared to previous period 6 indicators performing worse compared to previous period
Indicators showing as on target Current performance against target Availability of Data Direction of Performance Quartile position
adults,18-69, with LD known to ASCH, in settled accommodation at time of most recent assessment, formal review or other MDT meeting ASC-03 Performance at Q2 is 92.99, which is better than the target of 92 , and better compared to Q2 last year (85.58) . High priority is given to ensuring that clients have settled accommodation as it is perceived to help maintain health and well-being. Those who are not classed as being in settled accommodation are not homeless, but are in hospital, a nursing home or similar accommodation. Monthly Upper middle
social care clients receiving self-directed support ASC-04 At Q2 a provisional figure of 85.65 has been recorded, which is better than the target of 63 and substantially better than Q2 2013 (57.15) . However, this only includes those in receipt of long-term services, as set out in previous guidance. A new target may be set later in the year, following work by the North West Performance Leads Group. Monthly Upper middle
adults (18-69) with learning disabilities in employment ASC-07 Performance at Q2 is 6.58, which is better than target (6), a slight improvement compared to Q2 2013 (6.53) and better than the NW average (5.2) . New Ventures and Supported Employment continue to explore opportunities for paid and voluntary employment for this cohort. Monthly Lower middle
of older people discharged from hospital to their own home or to a residential or nursing home or extra care housing bed for rehabilitation who are still at their place of residence 91 days after discharge ASC-18 Performance at Q2 is 90.5 which is better than target (87) and the same compared to Q2 last year. The Reablement Service is working with the Brookfield Resource Centre to improve the availability of staff and the provision of services and programmes to support clients following hospital discharge. Monthly Top
Number of older people aged 65 or over admitted on a permanent basis in the year to residential or nursing care per 100,000 population aged 65 or over - ASC-19 Performance at Q2 is 290.4, which is better than target (360), and significantly better compared to Q2 2013 (422). This relates to 96 permanent admissions for the year to date compared with 130 last year. All possible community based options are considered prior to permanent admissions being instigated. Monthly Bottom
All delayed transfer of care per 100,000 population aged 18 and over ASC-25a The rate at Q2 is 3.58, which is better than the target of 8 and relates to the latest available data at the end of August. Work is underway with the CCG performance team to identify Trusts where delays have occurred. Monthly Upper middle
of initial strategy discussions undertaken within 1 day of safeguarding alert to Contact Centre ASC-29a Performance at Q2 is 99, which is better than the target of 97 but slightly down compared to Q2 2013 (99.67). This demonstrates the high priority given to investigating and addressing safeguarding alerts promptly. Monthly Not comparable
14
Improving Peoples Lives Independent
Empowered Performance Overall continued
11 indicators currently on target 2 not meeting current target
5 indicators performing better compared to previous period 6 indicators performing worse compared to previous period
Indicator showing as on target Current performance against target Availability of Data Direction of Performance Quartile position
of visits to victim undertaken within 2 days of initial safeguarding strategy discussion ASC-30a Performance at Q2 is 93, which is better than the target of 83 and better compared to Q2 last year (85). The reasons for delayed visits include availability of the victim and the need for more information prior to agreeing a course of action. All visits outside the timescale are investigated and the reasons for agreed delays are recorded. Monthly Not comparable
children looked after at 31 March with 3 or more placements during the year CYP09 At the end of Q2, 3.5 of looked after children had 3 or more placements, which is better than the target of 7 but worse than Q2 2013 (3.3). Performance is better compared to the national averages (11 ) and the family group average of 12. Focus continues on supporting children and carers to ensure placement stability. Monthly Top
of single assessments for childrens social care that were carried out within timescale CYP-12a Performance at Q2 is 97.7, which is better than the target of 90. This is is the first time is has been possible to report on this indicator since the introduction of the single assessment and should provide more flexibility than the previous system of initial and core assessments , resulting in more assessments being completed within timescale. Monthly Cannot assess as this is the first time reported Comparable data not available
Total number of attendances at Youth and Play Service Provision CYP-53 28,394 attendances were recorded, at Q2, which is better than the target of 28,000 by 1.4. Delivery of the Youth and Play Service programme has had to be cut by at least 50 to make cash savings. This means that from Q3 the target will need to be revised. The commentary states that it is anticipated that the 2014/15 year-end attendance will be approximately 32,000. Monthly Not comparable
Indicators showing as not meeting target Current performance against target Availability of Data Direction of Performance Quartile position
social care clients satisfied with services received ASC-02 The result of the 2014 annual Adult Social Care Survey is 65.5 , missing the target of 73, worse compared to the 2013/14 outturn (67.2), but better than the national average of 64.9. This indicator is also a component of a wider quality of life index for the Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework where St.Helens scored 19.4 from a maximum of 24, which is better than the national average of 19. Annual (June) Upper middle
children becoming subject of a child protection plan for a 2nd or subsequent time CYP10 By the end of Q2, 26 children had been re-registered for a Child Protection Plan, giving a figure of 17.6 , which has missed the target of 14.5 but is better compared to Q2 2013 (19.4). An audit of CP Plans is being undertaken to ensure their quality and effectiveness . Monthly Bottom


15
Creating A Better Place Safer Stronger
Summary
The following St. Helens Plan priorities contribute to this aim
Reducing levels of crime, disorder and anti-social behaviour Making places feel safer for local people Reducing the level of harm caused by drug and alcohol misuse Supporting neighbourhood development and community cohesion
Reducing crime, disorder and anti-social
behaviour remains a key priority. However, a
number of pressures have been identified
regarding a rise in levels of violent,
acquisitive and wounding offences, which,
although comparatively low when measured against
the City Region average, have continued to rise
since the beginning of the year. As a result of a
HMIC Inspection, like many of the forces across
the country, Merseyside Police have changed their
crime recording practices. Further discussion
with Merseyside Police is in progress to identify
the future impact of the new crime recording
requirements on performance and to consider if
future targets need to be reviewed in response to
this. Any discussions on this will be subject to
the agreement and endorsement of the Community
Safety Partnership. The Community Safety
Partnership has identified one of its key
priorities as the need to support victims of
crime. This has resulted in targeted work, such
as the No Place for Hate campaign to encourage
victims of all types of hate crimes to come
forward to report their issues and concerns and
to provide them with the necessary support and
guidance. This has had a positive effect, with
an increase in the numbers coming forward to
report this traditionally under-reported crime
compared with last year, reflecting the increased
confidence victims have in reporting this type of
crime. The Safer Communities Service continued to
support the work of the Community Safety
Partnership (CSP) through its Delivery Plan. This
included support for the Neighbourhood Action
Groups and delivery of services at a local level.
The Service incorporates a Neighbourhood
Initiatives Team to support the delivery of
neighbourhood management in areas agreed by the
Local Strategic Partnership as facing significant
deprivation and the challenges associated with
this. In relation to the Anti-Social Behaviour,
Crime and Policing Act 2014 a case review process
for victims of anti-social behaviour, known as
the Community Trigger, is due to come into
force in Quarter 3. A report on this will be
submitted to the Safer Communities Overview and
Scrutiny Panel in due course. For the year to
date (April September 2014), there have been 44
young people who became First time Entrants (
FTE) to the youth justice system, in comparison
to 28 young people in April-September 2013.
St.Helens had 398 FTEs between January and
December 2013, which was much better than the
North West average of 429 and England average of
441. Due to our excellent recent performance in
this area it will be more challenging to continue
to achieve reductions in FTEs, although the Youth
Offending Service are proactive in escalating and
seeking agreeable resolution in those cases where
action taken falls outside of agreed protocols
and procedures. It must also be remembered that
some young people will go on to re-offend
following a diversionary intervention and will
eventually exhaust their opportunities to be
diverted from the criminal justice system. The
service is also considering the nature of the
diversionary offer and its effectiveness to
address subsequent offending. There were only 2
young people (2.6) who received a custodial
sentence out of a total of 77 court disposals
between April and September 2014. This is better
than the 11 being achieved at the end of Quarter
2 2013 and is better than the target of 7.5.
Work to develop and improve education and health
resources within the YOS is ongoing and the
service is focusing on the quality and
effectiveness of the prevention and diversion
interventions it delivers, as well as working
with partners to provide a more joined-up
service. A review of the Pan Merseyside YOS
Diversion model is also underway to ensure a
consistent approach throughout the region.
16
Creating A Better Place Safer Stronger
Summary continued
Other key priorities are to make places feels
safer for local people and to reduce the level of
harm caused by drug and alcohol misuse. Actions
taken in Quarter 2 to address these issues
include Operation Safe Space identified a
number of vulnerable and hotspot locations for
anti-social behaviour, criminal damage and/or
arson, which concentrated on public parks
and open spaces. Patrols and Outreach teams were
directed to known hotspots and engaged with local
young people via their Fire Fit Active
Challenge taking part in a range of sports.
Schools that took part in the Active Challenge
included, Merton Bank Primary School in St
Helens. The Community Safety Partnership ran
the One Punch Can Kill campaign to highlight
the links between too much alcohol and violence,
which can have potentially fatal
consequences. The campaign was targeted at the
Town Centre evening economy and involved a
publicity campaign and enhanced the Town
Centre policing for a 7 day period to advise on
the danger of excessive drinking. Partnership
working on reducing retail violence is being
undertaken by Council officers across Merseyside
in conjunction with the Police and a
presentation was given to senior police officers
and national retailers on the contribution health
and safety enforcement work can make to
introducing crime prevention measures into
retail outlets. Targeted interventions are now
being planned to tackle retail violence in local
betting shops and other gambling
establishments. It is likely that this area of
work will develop further over the coming
months. To coincide with National Older
Peoples Day (1st October), Council officers
attended libraries across the borough providing
advice and information on how to deal with
doorstep callers, avoid being a victim of scam
mail and phone calls and choose reputable,
trustworthy tradesmen. This advice included
how to access our Trader Register which provides
a list of local businesses who are vetted by St
Helens Trading Standards and who are committed to
good customer service. Since April
this year St Helens Trading Standards officials
have been involved in 5 seizures of illicit
tobacco leading to 35,000 cigarettes being seized
and 8.4Kg of hand rolling tobacco. "Illicit"
tobacco often contains unknown substances,
including in some instances rat droppings, and
may be sold cheaply and to children,
undermining efforts to reduce tobacco use which
kills half of all users and is particularly
endemic in the most deprived wards in St Helens.
Alcohol related hospital admissions for all
ages and for those under 18 remain better than
target but there has been an increase in hospital
admissions for substance misuse among under-18
year olds. Further analysis is needed to
understand the reason for this so that
appropriate service provision, support and
pathways can be provided. To support
neighbourhood development and community cohesion
good progress continues on the Wargrave Big Local
project with input from a range of partners,
including Helena and the Council working together
with local residents. A number of community
consultation events have been held to determine
priorities for the area and develop the action
plan which will be completed and submitted early
in the new year, thus allowing the draw down of
funding to progress the community led
regeneration project.
17
Creating A Better Place Safer Stronger
Performance Overall
2 indicators currently on target 5 indicator not meeting current target
1 indicator performing better compared to previous period 5 indicators performing worse compared to previous period
Indicators showing as on target Current performance against target Availability of Data Direction of Performance Quartile position
Number of alcohol related admissions per 100,000 PH-07 At Q2 performance is 1299.2, which is better than the target of 1571.5 and better compared to Q2 2013 (1281.9). During Q2, the Real Lives, campaign was ongoing and aimed to use real life experiences to get across to local people the key health problems connected to alcohol misuse and the importance of reducing these risks. Local information indicates that this campaign was successful and resulted in more people accessing advice, support and treatment services. Quarterly Bottom
rate in repeat victimisation for domestic violence cases being managed by a MARAC SC-06 At the end of Q2 the cumulative repeat rate for domestic violence cases was 19.8, which is better than Q1 but worse compared to Q2 last year (9,4). Comparative data is unavailable across Merseyside as the Merseyside Criminal Justice Board no longer collates this. Following the recent self-assessment of the St.Helens MARAC, an action plan has been put in place and progress will be monitored regularly. Monthly Not comparable

18
Creating A Better Place Safer Stronger
Performance Overall
2 indicators currently on target 5 indicator not meeting current target
1 indicator performing better compared to previous period 5 indicators performing worse compared to previous period
Indicator showing as not meeting target Current performance against target Availability of Data Direction of Performance Quartile position
of drug users that left drug treatment successfully who do not then re-present to treatment again within six months PH-08 The figure of 14.07 reported at Q2 relates to data available up to the end of August 2014, which is the latest available. This has marginally missed the target of 15 and is worse compared to Q2 last year (16.5). However it should be notes that September data has not been included in the Q2 figure, which will need updated as data becomes available. Nevertheless, local performance for both opiate and non-opiate users is better than the national average. Quarterly Top
Number of Violence Against the Person (with and without injury) offences SC-01a At the end of Q2 there were 1145 offences, which is 72 worse than the target of 666, and significantly worse compared to Q2 last year (752 offences), but remains better than the peer group average. The commentary states that the increase in offences was expected due to a change in crime recording practices, following a crime data inspection earlier in the year. Tackling violence crime remains a priority for the CSP and issues are discussed regularly and dealt with in line with the associated action plan. Monthly Top
Serious acquisitive crime rate (per 1000 population) SC-02 During Q2 the crime rate for this type of offence was 5.43, which has missed the target of 3.9, is worse compared to Q2 last year (3.39) and is worse than the peer group average. The commentary states that the increase in offences was expected due to a change in crime recording practices, following a crime data inspection earlier in the year. A range of partnership initiatives are in place to address this type of crime. Monthly Upper Middle
Number of incidents of anti-social behaviour SC-03 At the end of Q2 there were 3564 ASB calls, which is 22 worse than the target of 2922 and a 29 increase compared to the same period last year. Incidents of ASB usually involve rowdy and inconsiderate gatherings and the CSP ran Operation Safe Space which focussed on ASB in parks and open spaces. Also, 3 Section 30 Dispersal Orders operated across the borough. ASB in St.Helens has increased markedly compared to other Merseyside local authorities, particularly in Neighbourhoods D1 and D2. Monthly Not comparable
Number of first time entrants (FTEs) to the Youth Justice System per 100,000 population aged 10-17- SC-05 At the end of Q2, the rate of FTEs was 263, which has missed the target of 204 and is substantially worse compared to the Q2 rate last year (168). The introduction of Triage previously helped to reduce the number of FTEs but it is recognised nationally that this reduction will be difficult to sustain, given that repeat re-offenders will exhaust their options for alternatives to the youth justice system. However, reducing FTEs remains a priority, both nationally and locally, and our Strategic Annual Youth Justice Plan 2014/15 sets out a number of actions, involving multi-agency work, to improve performance. There is also a review of the Pan Merseyside YOS Diversion model to ensure a consistent approach across the region. Quarterly Top

19
Creating A Better Place Cleaner, Greener
Accessible Summary
The following St. Helens Plan priorities contribute to this aim
Ensuring a clean and attractive Borough Reducing waste and increasing recycling Reducing our carbon footprint and impact on the environment Improving the accessibility, standard and safety of our transport network and infrastructure
Progress this Quarter to ensure St.Helens is a
clean and attractive borough includes The
restoration of Victoria Park was completed and
the park was officially opened on 19th of August
2014 by the Mayor, Councillor Pearl, and a
number of facilities are now being maintained by
their respective owners, including the Gate
Lodge, Orangery, walled garden, tennis courts,
pond, folly and rose garden, bandstand,
lighting, footpath surfacing and edging, seating
and litter bin installations, information notice
boards and planting. A meeting has been held
with representatives from St.Helens College to
involve their horticulture students in various
aspects within Victoria Park, carry out some
maintenance and future park developments
including additional works on the Community
Garden and also to provide instruction to the
Community Garden volunteers and AgeUKMM clients
about sowing and growing plants. The Greenhouse
section of the Orangery will be used to deliver
this training. The Parks Activity Plan has
been amended and updated to reflect how events
can be delivered using the restored facilities
within the park with a main element of
heritage connecting to these events. A revised
ten year management and maintenance plan for
Victoria Park is being rewritten and will be used
in the application for a Green Flag Award in
January 2015. The first community gardening
event within the greenhouse section of the
Orangery took place and regular monthly gardening
events will continue to be organised. An
allotment Forum network meeting is being planned
in Quarter 3 so that representatives from each
allotment site can meet and share ideas of
developing their own allotments sites for the
future and to look for external funding to assist
with this. The Council submitted a bid to the
Governments Contaminated Land Contingency Fund
to undertake interim and full remediation works
on Jackson and McCulloch Streets and for full
remediation works in the northern zone of the
Tickle Avenue Estate. Local authority bids will
be assessed by the Environment Agency on
behalf of DEFRA and it is expected that decisions
regarding submissions will be announced in
October. The introduction of the Environmental
Wardens Service has resulted in the issue of an
increased number of fixed penalty notices for
littering, waste and dog fouling offences.
The initiative operates borough wide with
specific focus placed in areas of high footfall
such as the Phase 1 Local Centres namely,
Town Centre, Rainhill, Rainford, Fingerpost,
Sutton, Cambridge Road, Billinge, Earlstown,
Thatto Heath and Four Acre. The Environmental
Wardens are working in conjunction with the
Councils Waste Collection and Street Scene
Services to undertake a short focused project,
which is aimed at assessing the impact
litter enforcement can have on addressing wider
issues of waste in residential areas. Improving
recycling rates and reducing landfill waste
remain priorities and at the end of Quarter 2 we
can see the following success 42of household
waste arisings have been sent for recycling,
which is better than the target of 39.5 and is a
significant improvement compared to Quarter 2
2013 (31).
20
Creating A Better Place Cleaner, Greener
Accessible Summary continued
  • New routes for collection of recycling
    materials commenced in Quarter 2 to improve
    efficiency and reduce the number of vehicles in
    use.
  • 483.19 kilograms of residual household waste
    per household has been collected, which is better
    than target (550kg) and has improved from Quarter
    2
  • 2013 (603kg).
  • Waste sent to landfill has also improved from
    last year and is just below 50 compared to 58
    in Quarter 2 2013.
  • Tonnages of Green Waste have increased which
    is good news considering that cardboard and food
    waste were removed from the green waste stream.
  • All green waste will be sent to Whitemoss at
    Knowsley from November 2014.
  • Food waste can now be placed in ordinary bags
    and the changeover from biodegradable bags to the
    much cheaper non-degradable bags is imminent.
  • Food waste is now being taken to an energy
    from waste plant where bags are shredded and
    removed before processing.
  • The Commercial Waste Service will be delivered
    in-house from early November following a tender
    process.
  • Special Bulky waste collections will be
    charged from 1st December 2014 for anyone
    requesting a collection of large heavy items such
    as a garden
  • shed, three piece suite etc.
  • New calendars were distributed to all
    residents to inform them of Christmas Bank
    Holiday arrangements and the fact that Green
    Waste will be carried
  • out on a monthly basis from November to
    February 2015.
  • Work continues to reduce our carbon footprint and
    impact on the environment and the following will
    contribute to this, as well as reducing costs
  • The Street Lighting Invest to Save programme
    of 1.7m over 2 years is ongoing and the
    installation of 1881 LED luminares for
    residential areas commenced this Quarter, with an
    expected completion date of mid November 2014.
  • The Central Management system installed on the
    A580 and A570 enabled dimming of the lights from
    early August.
  • Improvements to our transport network and
    infrastructure can be evidenced as follows

21
Creating A Better Place Cleaner, Greener
Accessible Performance Overall
3 indicators currently on target 3 indicators not meeting current target
3 indicators performing better compared to previous period 3 indicators performing worse compared to previous period
Indicators showing as on target Current performance against target Availability of Data Direction of Performance Quartile position
Amount of direct greenhouse gas emissions from local authority own estate and operations EP-02a Performance reported at Q2 is the 2014/15 outturn of 23.32 which is better than the target of 25.5 and better than last years outturn (26.55). Overall we have reduced direct GHG emissions by 18 compared to the 2009/10 baseline and there has been a 12 decrease from last year. Emissions from electricity in Council buildings are lower and from street lighting they are almost 20 lower compared to the baseline year. Annual (July) No comparable data available
of household waste recycled EP-03 Performance at Q2 is 42.03, which is better than target (39.5) , better than Q1 (39.39) and an improvement from Q2 2013 (31.04). Recycling rates continue to increase although promotional work to increase rates in some areas is needed. Quarterly Bottom (2012/13)
Amount of residual household waste collected per household (kg) EP-06 Performance recorded at Q2 is 483.19 kg, which is better than the target of 550 kg, is better than Q1 (517.97kg) and is a significant improvement compared to Q2 last year (603 kg). This is very positive performance which looks likely to exceed the annual target set and is in line with the increase in recycling and the corresponding decrease in landfill. Quarterly Bottom (2012/13)
Indicator showing as not meeting target Current performance against target Availability of Data Direction of Performance Quartile position
Number of green flag awards EP-01 Performance at Q2 is the 2014/15 outturn of 11, which has missed the target of 12 and is worse than last years outturn of 12. The under-performance is due to the awarding body, Tidy Britain, only awarding 11 green flags from the 12 applied for. However, their decision not to award a green flag to Siding Lane has been challenged. The result of this challenge will be reported when available. Annual (August) Top
Number of people killed or seriously injured in road traffic accidents EP-04 Performance at Q2 is the 2013/14 outturn (73) which missed the target of 56. Further speed limits of 20mph areas have been introduced across the borough, which should reduce the number and severity of accidents. New data will be available in March 2015. Annual (March) Bottom
of land and highways that is assessed as having deposits of litter at an acceptable level EP-05 The cumulative figure recorded for Q2 is 94, which has missed the target of 96, is slightly worse than Q1 (95) and worse com
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