STORY ELEMENTS - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – STORY ELEMENTS PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 702509-MzBiM



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

STORY ELEMENTS

Description:

STORY ELEMENTS What parts make up a story? – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:284
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 35
Provided by: Donna305
Learn more at: http://davoniafreeman.cmswiki.wikispaces.net
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: STORY ELEMENTS


1
STORY ELEMENTS
  • What parts make up a story?

2
Story ELEMENTS
  • Setting
  • Characters
  • Point of View
  • Plot
  • Conflict
  • Theme

3
Setting
Time and place where the action occurs
  • Details that describe
  • Furniture
  • Scenery
  • Customs
  • Transportation
  • Clothing
  • Dialects
  • Weather
  • Time of day
  • Time of year

4
Elements of a Setting
5
The Functions of a Setting
  • We left the home place behind, mile by slow
    mile, heading for the mountains, across the
    prairie where the wind blew forever.
  • At first there were four of us with one
    horse wagon and its skimpy load. Pa and I
    walked, because I was a big boy of eleven. My
    two little sisters romped and trotted until they
    got tired and had to be boosted up to the wagon
    bed.
  • That was no covered Conestoga, like Pas folks
    came West in, but just an old farm wagon, drawn
    by one weary horse, creaking and rumbling
    westward to the mountains, toward the little
    woods town where Pa thought he had an old uncle
    who owned a little two-bit sawmill.
  • To create a mood or atmosphere
  • To show a reader a different way of life
  • To make action seem more real
  • To be the source of conflict or struggle
  • To symbolize an idea

Taken from The Day the Sun Came Out by D.
Johnson
6
Types of Characters
  • People or animals
  • Major characters
  • Minor characters
  • Protagonist
  • Antagonist
  • Round characters
  • Flat characters
  • Static characters
  • Dynamic characters

7
TYPES OF CHARACTERS
  • Protagonist the main character in a literary
    work. Usually the hero/heroine, but could be a
    villain.
  • Antagonist the principal character in
    opposition to the protagonist or hero/heroine in
    a literary work (foil).

8
TYPES OF CHARACTERS
  • Round characters well developed change over
    time (dynamic) we get to know a lot about them
    usually major characters
  • Flat characters appear in the story, but we
    only know the basics of who they are (name, job,
    etc) do not change (static)

9
Characterization
  • A writer reveals what a character is like and how
    the character changes throughout the story.
  • Two primary methods of characterization
  • Direct- writer tells what the character is like
  • Indirect- writer shows what a character is like
    by describing what the character looks like, by
    telling what the character says and does, and by
    what other characters say about and do in
    response to the character.

10
Direct Characterization
And I dont play the dozens or believe in
standing around with somebody in my face doing a
lot of talking. I much rather just knock you down
and take my chances even if Im a little girl
with skinny arms and a squeaky voice, which is
how I got the name Squeaky. From Raymonds
Run by T. Bambara
11
Indirect Characterization
The old man bowed to all of us in the room.
Then he removed his hat and gloves, slowly and
carefully. Chaplin once did that in a picture,
in a bank--he was the janitor. From Gentleman
of Rio en Medio by J. Sedillo
12
Elements of Character
13
Factors in Analyzing Characters
  • Physical appearance of character
  • Personality
  • Background/personal history
  • Motivation
  • Relationships
  • Conflict
  • Does character change?

14
JUNE STORY ELEMENTS
  • SETTING
  • MAIN CHARACTER
  • MINOR CHARACTERS
  • POINT OF VIEW
  • INTERNAL CONFLICT/SOLUTION
  • EXTERNAL CONFLICT/SOLUTION
  • THEME
  • MOOD
  • TONE
  • PLOT ON A PLOT MAP

15
Plot
  • The series of events in a story is called the
    storys plot. A plot usually centers around a
    conflict a problem faced by the main character.
    In a typical plot, the action that the characters
    take to solve the problems builds, or rises,
    toward a climax, an important decision that
    becomes the turning point of the story. At that
    point, or shortly afterward, the action falls.
    The problem may be solved or changed and the
    story ends.

16
(No Transcript)
17
Parts of a Plot
  • Exposition Characters and setting are
    introduced (protagonist/antagonist ) an
    opening situation that gives rise to conflict
  • Rising Action - events that occur as the conflict
    is introduced interest and suspense builds
  • Climax- highest point of interest or suspense of
    story the main character comes face to face
    with the conflict and changes in some way
    (turning point)
  • Falling Action - all of the action which follows
    the climax loose ends are tied the
    conflict/climax are taken care of
  • Solution/Resolution/Denouement- the story comes
    to a reasonable conclusion

18
Diagram of Plot
Climax Highest action Main character face to
face with conflict
Falling Action Loose ends tied conflict/climax
taken care of
Rising Action Conflicts develop- Interest and
suspense builds
Resolution/Solution/ Denouement The story comes
to a reasonable ending
Exposition
Characters and Setting are introduced - Inciting
incident/ Opening situation (protagonist/antagonis
t)
19
Special Techniques of Plot
  • Suspense- excitement or tension
  • Foreshadowing- hint or clue about what will
    happen in story
  • Flashback- interrupts the normal sequence of
    events to tell about something that happened in
    the past
  • Surprise Ending - conclusion that reader does not
    expect

20
Conflict
  • Conflict is a struggle between opposing forces
  • Every plot must contain some kind of conflict
  • Stories can have more than one conflict
  • Conflicts can be external or internal
  • External conflict- outside force may be person,
    group, animal, nature, or a nonhuman obstacle
  • Internal conflict- takes place in a characters
    mind

21
EXTERNAL CONFLICT
  • A struggle with an outside force
  • 1) Man versus Man a physical/verbal conflict
    with a person or group.
  • 2) Man versus Nature - a conflict with an
    animal, weather, plant, or physical feature.
  • 3) Man versus Society a conflict with a social
    institution such as the government/police.

22
INTERNAL CONFLICT
  • This conflict that takes place in a characters
    mind. A decision that a character has to make or
    a problem that they have to solve.

23
Theme
  • A central message about life or human nature that
    is conveyed by a work of literature.
  • Can be expressed by one or two sentence
    statements about human beings or about life.
  • May be stated directly or implied (you must
    figure it out).

24
DERIVING THEME
  • Title - may give a clue to the theme.
  • Character review the actions, thoughts, and
    concerns of the main characters. Ask what the
    main character has learned or how the character
    has changed.
  • Setting Notice how setting affects the
    characters, plot, and mood.
  • Plot How are the conflicts resolved?

25
DERIVING THEME
  • TITLE / CHARACTER/ SETTING/ PLOT

26
POINT OF VIEW
  • Point of view refers to how a writer chooses
    to narrate a story. Every story is told from a
    particular point of view or perspective.
    Usually, a story is told from either the first
    person or the third-person point of view.
  • TYPES
  • First Person The narrator is a character in the
    story who can reveal only personal thoughts and
    feelings and what he or she sees and is told by
    other characters. He/she cant tell us thoughts
    of other characters. Pronouns such as I, me, and
    we are used.

27
Third Person A story is told from the
third-person point of view has a narrator who is
outside the story and uses pronouns such as he,
she, and they. There are two types of third
person point of view. Third Person Omniscient
(all-knowing)- The narrator is an all-knowing
outsider who can enter the minds of more than one
of the characters to relate their thoughts and
feelings. Third Person Limited - The narrator
is an outsider who sees into the mind of one of
the characters to reveal what that character
thinks, feels, and observes.
28
  • Second Person This point of view appears in
    directions such as the taking of medications,
    cooking, or putting something together. An
    example would be Take two tablets every four
    hours. Do not exceed eight tablets in twenty-four
    hours.

29
MOOD AND TONE
  • MOOD (YOU)
  • A mood is a feeling that a literary work
    conveys to readers. Writers carefully chose words
    and phrases to create moods. A mood is an emotion
    such as sadness, excitement or anger. (Mood is
    the emotion(s) that you, the reader feel(s) as
    you read a text.)
  • TONE (AUTHOR)
  • The tone of a work conveys the writers
    attitude toward his or her subject. A work may
    have one tone throughout, such as humorous,
    serious, or impatient. Sometimes, however, the
    tone may change several times in the course of a
    work. (Tone is how the writer feels.)

30
CHANGING TONE
  • ORIGINAL
  • Lepton, the yellow Labrador, lay napping in
    the sun
  • room. Visions of cats filled his dreams as he
    slept
  • soundly.
  • CONFRONTATIONAL
  • Lepton awoke from his sleep with a start
    the hair on his back as stiff as a brush. He
    stared intently out the window of the sun room,
    barking loudly at any moving object. The angry
    canine pressed his nose against the windowpane,
    growling and snapping at all living creatures.

31
MYSTERIOUS
  • As Lepton, the yellow Labrador, lay napping in
    the sun room, a shadowy presence lurched into the
    doorway. Piercing green eyes glared at the
    sleeping canine as a bony hand flipped the light
    switch off
  • SARCASTIC
  • Lepton, the ferocious guard dog, lay in his
    usual position on his back. Instead of
    vigilantly surveying the yard for intruders, he
    snored loudly. Wow! exclaimed Dennis, Ive
    never seen such an active dog. Boy I sure feel
    protected with this wild beast around.

32
POSITIVE, NEGATIVE, OR NEUTRAL
  • Directions Write a () next to words with a
    positive feeling
  • write a (-) next to words with a negative
    feeling write an N next to words that are
    neutral.
  • Feeling Words
  • happy excited frustrated
    confused
  • angry sad
    surprised anxious
  • scared unhappy nervous
    relieved
  • relaxed reassured passionate
    embarrassed
  • irritated disappointed uncertain
    skeptical
  • optimistic restless threatened
    offended
  • heartbroken mournful bored
    guilty

33
Tone Scene
  • 1. humorous
  • 2. suspicious
  • 3. angry
  • 4. compassionate
  • 5. sarcastic
  • 6. supportive
  • 7. energetic
  • 8. guilty
  • 9. nervous
  • 10. disappointed

34
June Story Elements
  • Setting
  • Main Character
  • Minor Characters
  • Point of View
  • Internal Conflict/Solution
  • External Conflict/Solution
  • Theme
  • Mood
  • Tone
  • Plot in a Plot Map
About PowerShow.com