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Elements of a Story

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Elements of a Story The most important components that make up a story, novel, or piece of literature. – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Elements of a Story


1
Elements of a Story
  • The most important components that make up a
    story, novel, or piece of literature.

2
PLOT
  • The series of related events that make up a story
    or drama.

3
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4
SETTING
  • The time and place of a story

5
IRONY
  • Contrast or discrepancy between expectations and
    reality

6
WHAT KIND OF IRONY?
  • VERBAL
  • SITUATIONAL
  • DRAMATIC
  • Writer says one thing but means another
  • What really happens is opposite of what has
    happened
  • When the audience/reader knows something the
    character does not

7
Ironic
8
IMAGERY
  • LANGUAGE THAT APPEALS TO THE SENSES

9
Symbolism
  • A symbol stands for or represents something else
  • ? - happiness
  • ? -sadness
  • ? - love
  • ?
  • ?
  • ?
  • ?

10
TONE
  • The attitude the writer takes toward the reader,
    a subject, or a character(s).

11
Mood
  • The feeling the reader gets after reading the text

12
Style
  • The way an author uses language to write a story

13
THEME
  • The central idea or insight of a work of
    literature.

14
Foreshadowing
  • A hint in the text (from the author) that
    something is going to happen
  • Examples Dark clouds, thunderstorms, blood,
    graveyards

15
CONFLICT A clash of actions, ideas, goals, or
desires in the plot of a story or novel.
  • CHARACTER VS. CHARACTER
  • CHARACTER VS. ENVIRONMENT
  • CHARACTER VS. HIMSELF
  • One character against another.
  • Character against the environment around him/her.
  • Character versus his inner self.

16
External Conflict A struggle between a character
and an outside force is an external conflict.
Characters may face several types of outside
forces. The outside force may be another
character. It may be the character and the
community. The outside force may also be forces
of nature. For example, a story might be the main
character struggling against the arctic cold.
Man against man Man against nature Internal
Conflict A struggle that takes place in a
character's mind is called internal conflict. For
example, a character may have to decide between
right and wrong or between two solutions to a
problem. Sometimes, a character must deal with
his or her own mixed feelings or emotions. Man
against himself.
17
  • The Importance of Conflict
  • Conflict is necessary to every story. In short
    stories, there is usually one major conflict. In
    longer stories, there could be several conflicts.
  • Conflict adds excitement and suspense to a story.
    The conflict usually becomes clear to the
    beginning of a story. As the plot unfolds, the
    reader starts to wonder what will happen next and
    how the characters will handle the situation.
    Many readers enjoy trying to predict the final
    outcome.
  • The excitement usually builds to a high point, or
    climax. The climax is the turning point of the
    story. Something has happened to resolve the
    conflict.

18
Reading for Conflict
  • As you read a story
  • identify the main characters
  • decide what conflict they face
  • look for steps they take to settle that conflict
  • see if the steps cause other conflict
  • watch for clues and try to predict what the
    characters will do
  • enjoy the buildup of suspense
  • put yourself in the story
  • decide if you would have solved the conflict in
    the same way

19
Point of View
  • 1st uses I told from one persons point of
    view
  • 3rd limited told in 3rd person a narrator
    dont know characters thoughts and opinions
  • 3rd omniscient as if God is telling the story
    we know everything about every character

20
Characterization
  • The creation of the image of imaginary person in
    drama, narrative poetry, the novel, or a short
    story.
  • Characterization generates plot and is revealed
    by actions, speech, thoughts, physical
    appearance, and the other characters thoughts or
    words about him.

21
Types of Characters
  • Static Character- Static characters are minor
    characters in a work of fiction who do not
    undergo substantial change or growth in the
    course of a story. Also referred to as
    "two-dimensional characters" or "flat
    characters," they play a supporting role to the
    main character, who as a rule should be round, or
    complex.
  •  Dynamic Character- The opposite of static
    characters, dynamic characters will undergo some
    kind of change in the course of the story.

22
Types of Characters
  • Flat Character- A flat character is a minor
    character in a work of fiction who does not
    undergo substantial change or growth in the
    course of a story. Also referred to as
    "two-dimensional characters" or "static
    characters," flat characters play a supporting
    role to the main character, who as a rule should
    be round.
  • Round Character- A round character is a major
    character in a work of fiction who encounters
    conflict and is changed by it. Round characters
    tend to be more fully developed and described
    than flat, or static, characters. If you think of
    the characters you most love in fiction, they
    probably seem as real to you as people you know
    in real life. This is a good sign that they are
    round characters.

23
Types of Characters
  • Stock characters draw from widely known cultural
    types for their characteristics and mannerisms,
    and are often used in parody. Every culture has
    its own set of stock characters.
  • The protagonist is the main character in a story,
    novel, drama, or other literary work, the
    character that the reader or audience empathizes
    with. The antagonist opposes the protagonist. In
    the most archetypical narratives, this boils down
    to bad guy vs. good guy
  • The antagonist in a work of fiction is the
    character who opposes the hero, or protagonist.
    The antagonist, when there is one, provides the
    story's conflict.

24
. Personality of a Character
  • When you write a character analysis, you will be
    expected to describe a character's personality.
  • We get to know characters in our stories through
    the things they say, feel, and do. It's not as
    difficult as it may seem to figure out a
    character's personality traits based on his/her
    thoughts and behaviors
  • You will receive clues about a character's
    personality through his or her
  • Words
  • Actions
  • Reactions
  • Feelings
  • Movements
  • Thoughts
  • Mannerisms

25
Character Role
  • When you write a character analysis, you must
    also define each character's role.
  • In addition to having personality traits,
    characters also fill certain roles in a story.
    They either play a major role, as a central
    element to the story, or they play a minor role
    to serve a supporting role in the story.
  • Protagonist The protagonist of a story is often
    called the main character. The plot revolves
    around the protagonist. There may be more than
    one main character.
  • In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Huck Finn
    is the protagonist.
  • In Little Red Riding Hood, the little girl is the
    protagonist.

26
Character Role, cont.
  • Antagonist The antagonist is the character who
    represents a challenge or an obstacle to the
    protagonist in a story. In some stories, the
    antagonist is not a person!
  • In Little Red Riding Hood, the wolf is the
    antagonist.
  • In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, society is
    the antagonist. Society, with its unfair laws and
    rules, represents the obstacle to Huck's
    development as a person.
  • Foil A foil is a character who provides contrast
    to the main character (protagonist), in order to
    emphasize the main character's traits. In A
    Christmas Carol, the kind nephew Fred is the foil
    to nasty Ebenezer Scrooge.

27
Characterization
  • When you are asked to write a character analysis,
    you will be expected to explain how a character
    changes and grows. Most characters go through
    changes as a story unfolds-otherwise, stories
    would be pretty boring!
  • There is direct characterization and indirect
    characterization.
  • Direct characterization is when the author tells
    the reader something about the character.

28
Characterization
  • Indirect characterization is when the author uses
    words to show the reader something about the
    character. The author can show you what the
    character says, do and thinks and through water
    other characters say about, think about, or how
    they act towards that character.
  • 1) Action 2) How Others View Them 3) Private
    Thoughts 4) Dialogue 5) Appearance

29
Persona
  • A persona is a fictional character. Sometimes the
    term means the mask or alter-ego of the author
    it is often used for first person works and lyric
    poems, to distinguish the writer of the work from
    the character in the work.
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