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TRENDS AND INNOVATIONS IN THE FIELD OF LATINOS AND EDUCATION

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Title: TRENDS AND INNOVATIONS IN THE FIELD OF LATINOS AND EDUCATION


1
"TRENDS AND INNOVATIONS IN THE FIELD OF LATINOS
AND EDUCATION"
  • Dr. Enrique G. Murillo, Jr.
  • California State University, San
    Bernardino March 7, 2007
  • Texas Tech University
  • Sponsored by Helen DeVitt Jones
  • Lecturer Series

2
SOME KEY STARTING POINTS OF GENERAL AWARENESS
  • 1. We inaugurated the new millennium, as the
    largest minority group in the U.S.
  • 2. As of 1998, our children, numerically, had
    already become the largest minority student
    demographic in U.S. public schools
  • 3. Our students, in general are the most
    under-educated major segment of the U.S.
    population, and are more than twice as likely to
    be undereducated than all groups combined
  • 4. Our students in particular, have the highest
    dropout (pushout) rate, score among the lowest
    on achievement tests, and have low college
    enrollment rates

Context as Latinos
3
SOME KEY STARTING POINTS OF GENERAL AWARENESS
SOME KEY STARTING POINTS OF GENERAL AWARENESS
Note The first number in each box represents
females the second, males. Source U.S. Bureau
of the Census (2000).
The U.S. Educational Pipeline, by Race/Ethnicity
and Gender, 2000.
4
SOME KEY STARTING POINTS OF GENERAL AWARENESS
SOME KEY STARTING POINTS OF GENERAL AWARENESS
Note The first number in each box represents
females the second, males. Source U.S. Bureau
of the Census (2000).
The U.S. Educational Pipeline, by Subgroup and
Gender, 2000.
5
SOME KEY STARTING POINTS OF GENERAL AWARENESS
  • LATINO STUDENTS ATTEND SCHOOLS
  • 1. With fewer resources, staffing and programs
  • 2. With a high mobility rate of both students and
    teachers
  • 3. That are located in communities with high
    poverty rates
  • 4. That are racially segregated (with
    academically segregated tracks)
  • 5. With less-qualified teachers
  • 6. With more and harsher discipline
  • 7. With lowered expectations for student
    achievement, and
  • 8. With mismatches between school and home culture

Context as Educators
6
SOME KEY STARTING POINTS OF GENERAL AWARENESS
  • 1. A consistent theme is that many people,
    including educators, policy-makers, advocates and
    activists, are often not fully aware of the
    educational research that currently exists or how
    it applies.
  • 2. Increasingly, there has been an emphasis on
    evidence-based practice in education. The most
    recent incarnation of this focus is
    "scientifically based research" (SBR), a phrase
    often associated with the No Child Left Behind
    (NCLB) Act of 2001.

Context as Researchers and Scholars
7
What areas of childrens lives do we have any
direct influence over?
  • Home Societal Economic
    Moral/Ethical Motivational
  • Curricular / Instructional Cognitive
    Affective Mind/Heart

HOW CAN WE TACKLE THE MISMATCHES BETWEEN SCHOOL
AND HOME???
8
AMONG THE TASKS TO HELP US TACKLE THE MISMATCHES
BETWEEN SCHOOL AND HOME, WE NEED TO
  • Learn about the cultural histories, traits,
    backgrounds and diversity of and among Latinos

9
AMONG THE TASKS TO HELP US TACKLE THE MISMATCHES
BETWEEN SCHOOL AND HOME, WE NEED TO
  • Build teacher training programs that include a
    strong student-home culture component so teachers
    are not only sympathetic and sensitive to a
    different culture but also appreciative of
    students' backgrounds and willing to structure
    the school experience to be compatible with
    students

10
AMONG THE TASKS TO HELP US TACKLE THE MISMATCHES
BETWEEN SCHOOL AND HOME, WE NEED TO
  • Create qualified teachers that have specialized
    knowledge and skills in language acquisition,
    biliteracy, and cross-cultural learning

11
AMONG THE TASKS TO HELP US TACKLE THE MISMATCHES
BETWEEN SCHOOL AND HOME, WE NEED TO
  • Research the local community and its social
    reception, and the impact of this on the
    effectiveness of schools and the learning of
    children in classrooms

12
AMONG THE TASKS TO HELP US TACKLE THE MISMATCHES
BETWEEN SCHOOL AND HOME, WE NEED TO
  • Combat the deficit views of Latino students and
    parents and understand that the incorporation of
    students' language, culture, and experiential
    knowledge should not conflict with teachers'
    responsibility for providing students with
    particular academic content knowledge and
    learning skills and

13
AMONG THE TASKS TO HELP US TACKLE THE MISMATCHES
BETWEEN SCHOOL AND HOME, WE NEED TO
  • Create meaningful and trusting relationships with
    Latino parents and extended family

14
Q How can we make research more relevant to
practice?
  • Latino educators and researchers (as many in the
    general scholarly community) are involved in
    rethinking our roles and identities, our methods,
    texts and contexts. We grapple with ways to
    Better communicate findings Engage in broader
    discourse with multiple communities Insert
    ourselves into the larger dialogue about
    education Be proactive and responsive Write
    alternative texts Use new methods
  • A key issue that relates to the question of
    method is the question of values. We often
    espouse a commitment to demonstrating the
    viability of truly alternative educational
    approaches.

15
Three Current Projects A B The
Handbook of Latinos and Education Theory,
Research and Practice C
16
Vision
  • JLE seeks to identify and stimulate more relevant
    research, practice, communication, and theory by
    providing a rich variety of information and
    fostering an outlet for sharing. The various
    manifestations of the diverse frameworks and
    topical areas typically range anywhere from--but
    aren't limited to--theoretical and empirical
    analyses, policy discussions, research reports,
    program recommendations, evaluation studies,
    finding and improving practical applications,
    carefully documenting the transition of theory
    into real-world practice, linking theory and
    research, new dissertation research, literature
    reviews, reflective discussions, cultural
    studies, and literary works.  

17
Vision
  •  
  • JLE is open to varying research methodologies and
    narrative models so as to encourage submissions
    from varied disciplines, areas, and fields.
    "Education" is defined in the broad cultural
    sense and not limited to just formal schooling.
    Particular attention is given to geographical
    equity to assure representation of all regions
    and "Latino" groups in the United States.
    Policies and practices promoting equity and
    social justice for linguistically and culturally
    diverse groups are particularly encouraged and
    welcomed for consideration. A range of formats
    for articles is encouraged, including research
    articles, essay reviews and interviews,
    practitioner and community perspectives, book and
    media reviews, and other forms of creative
    critical writing.

18
Editorial Scope
  • The Journal of Latinos and Education (JLE)
    provides a cross-, multi-, and interdisciplinary
    forum for scholars and writers from diverse
    disciplines who share a common interest in the
    analysis, discussion, critique, and dissemination
    of educational issues that impact Latinos. There
    are four broad arenas which encompass most issues
    of relevance  (1) Policy, (2) Research, (3)
    Practice, and (4) Creative Literary Works.
  • JLE encourages novel ways of thinking about the
    ongoing and emerging questions around the
    unifying thread of Latinos and education. The
    journal supports dialogical exchange--for
    researchers, practitioners, authors, and other
    stakeholders who are working to advance
    understanding at all levels and aspects--be it
    theoretical, conceptual, empirical, clinical,
    historical, methodological, and/or other in scope.

19
Creation out of Collaboration
  • The JLE was first conceived when a group of
    scholar/activists from CSU San Bernardino
    presented a symposium on the effects of
    Californias Proposition 227 at the American
    Educational Studies Association in 1999. During
    this conference, we conversed about, and proposed
    the collaborative creation of a new academic
    journal to specifically address issues
    surrounding the education, broadly defined, of
    Latinos in the U.S.
  • Upon return, the group that now included members
    of the Center for Equity in Education at CSUSB
    (now the Executive Council), met regularly over
    the course of a full year to design and create
    the JLE. In conducting a comprehensive document
    analysis and review of existing academic
    journals, it became evident that articles on
    Latinos and Education were being published
    sporadically, appearing singly, apart, or in
    isolated instances in highly specialized
    journals, or were simply absent. This situation
    is created by a combination of factors including
    but not limited to a lack of interest in these
    issues, high competition for public space, and
    /or lack of opportunity to publish.

20
Need and Niche
  • What we learned from our Document Analysis
  • At the moment, there are still too few major
    publications on Latinos and Education. There are
    research reports currently published all over the
    place or in highly specialized books and
    journals. Further, there is no one comprehensive
    published review of theory, research and practice
    on the topic.  Despite some seminal publications,
    Latino issues remain often seen as limited in
    focus (academic colonialism).  Mainstream
    publications tend to consider Latino issues as
    peripheral to broader issues in the discipline. 
    Mainstream publications also tend to focus on
    nationally known "Latino" authors and look only
    to the work of a few to publish.

21
FEATURE ARTICLES THEORY, RESEARCH, POLICY AND
PRACTICE Parental Motivation, Attitudes, Support
and Commitment in a Southern Californian Two-Way
Immersion Program Rosalie Giacchino-Baker and
Bonnie Piller Social, Cultural and Political
Influences on the Development of an Educational
Partnership James R. Valadez Negotiating Our
Way through the Gates of Academe Michelle A.
Holling and Amardo Rodriguez Increasing the
College Preparedness of At-Risk Students Alberto
F. Cabrera, Regina Deil-Amen, Radhika Prabhu,
Patrick T. Terenzini, Chul Lee, and Robert E.
Franklin, Jr. Worlds Together . . . Words Apart
An Assessment of the Effectiveness of
Arts-Based Curriculum for Second Language
Learners Stephanie Urso Spina Against the
Grain Confronting Hispanic Service Organizations
in Times of Increasing Inequalities, 1930 and
2005 Linda Heidenreich Maestras, Mujeres y
Mas Creating Teacher Networks for Resistance
and Voice Theresa Montaño and Joyce
Burstein Accountability by Assumption
Implications of Reform Agendas for Teacher
Preparation Socorro G. Herrera and
Kevin G. Murry Assimilation vs.
Multiculturalism Bilingual Education and the
Latino Challenge Julia Burdick-Will
and Christina Gómez A Tribute to Thomas P.
Carter (1927 2001) Activist Scholar and
Pioneer in Mexican American Education Richard R.
Valencia Pensando en Cynthia y su hermana
Educational Implications of U.S./Mexico
Transnationalism for Children Edmund T. Hamann,
Víctor Zúñiga and Juan Sánchez García If the
student is good, let him fly Moral Support for
College among Latino Immigrant Parents
Susan Auerbach
Table of Contents VOLUME 5, 2006
22
ESSAYS AND INTERVIEWS Being Seen/Being Heard
moving beyond visibility in the academy Robert
J. Torres VOCES COMMUNITY, PARENTS, TEACHERS
AND STUDENTS Como si le Falta un Brazo Latino
Immigrant Parents and the Costs of Not Knowing
English Jo Worthy A Latina Teachers Journal
Reflections on Language, Culture, Literacy, and
Discourse Practices Mariana Souto-Manning BOOK
AND MEDIA REVIEWS Book Review Teaching Hispanic
Children by Toni Griego Jones and Mary Lou
Fuller Paul H. Matthews Gibson, M.A., Gándara,
P., Koyama, J.P. (Eds.) (2004). School
Connections U.S. Mexican Youth, Peers, and
School Achievement. New York Teachers College
Press. Mónica G. García Robert K. Ream. 2005.
Uprooting Children Mobility, Social Capital, and
Mexican American Underachievement. New York
LFB Scholarly Publishing LLC. Gilberto Q.
Conchas ALTERNATIVE FORMATS Language
Lessons Melisa Cahnmann A Teachers
Indispensable Qualities A Freirean
Perspective Douglas J. Simpson, Garrett H.
Boroda, Betsy L. Bucy, Alan Burke, Walter L.
Doue, Sharon L. Faber, Mary C. Fehr, Wesley A.
Fryer, Gregory D. Gonzales, Chasidy J.
Harp-Woods, Sarah McMahan, Suzanne M. Nesmith,
Sherri A. Reynolds, Sandra E. Riegle, Jacqueline
E. Romano, Ruby J. Willey, Saundra Wimberley,
and Mijin Won
Table of Contents VOLUME 5, 2006
23
HLE shares the same vision and premise as JLE
However, the HLE will have the unique purpose
and function of profiling the scope and terrain
of this particular domain of academic inquiry. It
will represent the most significant and
potentially influential work in the field of
Latinos and Education, in terms of its
contributions to research, to professional
practice, and to the emergence of related
interdisciplinary studies and theory.
Handbook of Latinos and Education Theory,
Research Practice
24
Need and Niche
  • What we learned from our JLE experience
  • Currently there is no one comprehensive published
    review of research and practice on the topic of
    Latinos and Education. 
  •  
  • The Journal of Latinos and Education has helped
    provide an important publication avenue for
    writers who seek to address Latino Educational
    issues. 
  • However, the intent of the HLE is to provide
    chapters that will be a comprehensive review of
    research and practice on the topic, and not a
    research report of a single study, as is
    commonplace for a journal such as the JLE.

25
The length of the Handbook will be 600-900
printed pages (900 - 1200 manuscript pages) The
volume will be divided into sections, each
addressing a major theme in the field. Each
section will have about 6-10 chapters. Each
chapter will focus on a specific aspect within
the section theme Section I Theoretical and
Methodological Approaches Section
II Politics/Policy Section III Language and
Culture Section IV Teaching and
Learning Section V Appendix of Resources
Handbook of Latinos and Education Theory,
Research Practice
26
A multi-stakeholder collaborative
team Editorial Board help us build a contents
map, review chapter drafts, and identify the most
pertinent resources for the appendix. 
Consulting Editors work with specific authors
and chapters (to comprehensively review key
scholars, the array of conceptual, philosophical
and methodological approaches, and the main
programs of research and lines of thinking).
Associate Editors and Section Editors work with
the respective Section Teams, to hold the
sections together conceptually and address any
gaps in the knowledge base
Handbook of Latinos and Education Theory,
Research Practice
Advisory Board Chapter Authors Consulting
Editors Section Editors Associate
Editors Acquisitions, Production Manager and
CopyEditors Editor
27
One of the goals of HLE is to actively mentor the
next generation of educational researchers,
Latino or otherwise, working with our
populations.  Each Associate Editor (early
career) is paired with a Section Editor (veteran
scholar) whose reputation holds standing in the
field. Both will serve as a dyad, but the weight
of the management or oversight will rely mostly
with the junior scholar of early career, while
the veteran or mentor scholar will offer their
experience and knowledge to better charter the
terrain or mapping of the sections focus.
Additionally, a similar mentorship process is
integrated with the respective chapter
contributors to their section. That is, for as
many chapters as possible, contributors will be
asked to pair themselves in the similar early
career/veteran scholar dyads.  Then, moreover,
they are in turn paired with one or two
additional Consulting Editors. This
collaboration among chapter contributors, working
together with the consulting editors, section
editors, associate editors and together with the
principal editor, serves to triangulate the
content, validity, reliability and quality of the
scholarship.
Handbook of Latinos and Education Theory,
Research Practice
28
HLE Contents Map
  • SECTION I Theoretical and Methodological
    Approaches
  • Historical Foundations of Latino Education
  •  
  •  Reflexivity and Epistemology in Latino
    Educational Research
  •  
  •  Activist Research in Latino Education
  •  
  •  Latino Identities
  •  
  •  Borderlands Theories and Latino/Chicano Cultural
    Studies in Education
  •  
  •  Gender and Latina/Chicana Feminisms in Education
  •  
  •  Latino Critical Race Theory in Education
  •  
  •  Funds of Knowledge
  •  
  •  Social Capital Theory

29
HLE Contents Map
  • SECTION II Politics/Policy
  •  
  • New Latino Diaspora
  • Higher Education
  •  
  • Accountability and High Stakes Testing
  •  
  • Transnationalism/Globalization
  •  
  • Language Ideologies and Language Policy
  •  
  • Administration and Leadership
  •  
  • Race and Ethnicity
  •  
  • Faculty of Color in Academe
  •  
  • Quest for Social Justice

30
HLE Contents Map
  • SECTION III Language and Culture
  • Language
  • Language, Culture and Cognition
  • Language, Culture and Identity
  • Distributed Culture and Cognition
  • Biculturalism and Education
  • Bilingualism and Education
  • Dual Language Learning
  • Family and School Contexts
  • Immigration

31
HLE Contents Map
  • SECTION IV Teaching and
    Learning
  • Frameworks for Understanding the Schooling
    Experience of Latinos in K-12 Schools
  •  
  • Learning to Teach in Urban Schools Serving
    Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (Latino)
    Students
  •  
  • Teaching and Learning in an Era of
    Standards-Based Reform
  •  
  • Understanding the Impact of High Poverty on the
    Schooling Experiences of Latino Students
  •  
  • Language Policy and Implications for Classroom
    Practice
  •  
  • Focus on Educational Attainment and Student
    Achievement
  •  
  • Literacy and Biliteracy
  •  
  • Inquiry into the  Function of Private Schools in
    the Education of Latino Students
  •  
  • Non-Formal Schooling

32
HLE Contents Map
  • SECTION V
    Appendix of Resources 
  • Adult/Continuing Education    (ESL/Civics
    Instruction, GED, Vocational Training, Extended
    Studies, Community Colleges, Career Training,
    Literacy, Funding Opportunities, and more)
  •  
  • Commercial Products  (Software, Audio/Video
    Tapes, DVDs, Teaching Supplies/Aids, and more)
  •  
  • Demographics/Statistics  (Census and Statistics
    Agencies, and more)
  • Events   (Conferences, Society Meetings,
    Workshops/Seminars, Celebrations/Festivals, and
    more)
  • Government   (Legislation, Policy, Leadership,
    Politics, and more)
  • Groups  (Organizations, Agencies, Community
    Projects, Associations, Professional Societies,
    and more)
  •  
  • Higher Education   (Colleges, Universities,
    Institutes, Centers, Degrees, Programs,
    Concentrations, Funding Opportunities, Academic
    Competitions, Awards, Mentorship, Internships,
    Training, and more)
  • Internet Tools/Technology   (Sites,
    Webliographies, Clearinghouses, Portals,
    Digital/Virtual Libraries, Directories, and more)
  • Libraries/Galleries/Museums   (Collections,
    Archives, Permanent Exhibitions, and more)

33
The Appendix of Resources will serve as a
directory or guide for all those sharing a common
interest in educational issues that impact
Latinos and will be linked as part of the
National Latino Education Network (NLEN).    The
NLEN is a members-based electronic community
currently sponsored by the Journal of Latinos and
Education, made up of researchers, teaching
professionals and educators, academics, scholars,
administrators, independent writers and artists,
policy and program specialists, students,
parents, families, civic leaders, activists, and
advocates.  The website (http//nlen.csusb.edu/)
will provide online features, one of which is a
Resource Guide/Clearinghouse that allows members
to search and browse for resources, opportunities
and activities in the Latino Educational
community.  This online resource guide will be
made available in printed form in the Handbook of
Latinos and Education.  
Handbook of Latinos and Education Theory,
Research Practice



NLEN Resource Guide
Index Category
Sub-Category
Title
URL
Description
34
  • Enroll Online http//nlen.csusb.edu
  • Online Features and Benefits include An
    Archive/Directory that allows members to search
    and network with other registered members
    (individuals, institutions, businesses, agencies
    and groups). A Resource Guide/Clearinghouse that
    allows members to search and browse for
    resources, opportunities and activities in the
    Latino Educational community. An online and
    email Newsletter that allows members to access
    the latest information, news, stories and
    research on Latinos and Education. An online,
    searchable Announcements Database that allows
    members to post and search for all announcements
    there, including fellowships, awards, employment
    opportunities, calls for papers and other
    collaborative opportunities. E-Mail Listserve
    informing members of Breaking News that require
    immediate attention and action. Programs and
    News broadcasted via video and audio
    broadband.Online Surveys, which can be publicly
    displayed, about opinions and strategies in
    dealing with the current educational crisis faced
    by Latinos.

Join the NLEN
35
Para Los Niños
El Fin - Gracias
36
Workshop on Publishing Academic
Journals Dr. Enrique G. Murillo, Jr. California
State University, San Bernardino March 8,
2007 Texas Tech University - Sponsored by
Helen DeVitt Jones Lecturer Series
37
Q1 What kinds of things can we find out by
reading research publications?
  • Other research out there (references), reviews of
    available research
  • New terms
  • New questions to ask about a phenomenon
  • Methods for doing or replicating a study
  • Recommendations for practice prescriptions for
    action
  • How notions are defined or operationalized

38
Q2 Are some forms of research better or more
trustworthy than others? What types of
preliminary questions might you ask?
  • Where is the research presented?
  • How much information do you have about the
    methods?
  • Who put out/funded the research?
  • How representative is the sample?
  • Why did the researcher(s) do the study?
  • Can the study be replicated?
  • Given what you already know, do the findings seem
    reasonable?

39
Q3 What are the Foundations of Trust?
  • The peer-review process. - Different for
    presentations than for journals. - Blind
  • Journal selectivity. - Acceptance rate, editorial
    board, are the reviewers active researchers,
    judgement of others.
  • Reputation of the author. - Although sometimes it
    is the reputation that gets them published in the
    first place.
  • Source of Funding. - Government source, or major
    philanthropic organization usually a trustworthy
    sign.
  • Sponsorship. -Research or Professional
    Organization usually a trustworthy sign.

40
Q4 What are the Sources of Credibility?
Research is a public act - investigator must
relay a truthful account of whatever he or she
conducted
  • Where is research published Journals
    Conference Proceedings Monographs Books
    Internet
  • Peer reviewed journals provide the most
    reliable source of quality control. The process
    of peer review is generally considered critical
    to establishing a reliable body of research and
    knowledge. Scholars can only be expert in a
    limited area they rely upon peer-reviewed
    journals to provide reliable and credible
    research which they can build upon for subsequent
    or related research. As a result, significant
    scandal ensues when an author is found to have
    falsified the research included in a published
    article, as many other scholars, and more
    generally the field of study itself, have relied
    upon that research.
  • Less reliable Foundations (not peer reviewed)
  • Businesses (lobby for legislation)
  • Polling (often confuse with research)

41
Q5 What is the typical Journal Submission
Process?
  • In academia generally, submissions are
    unsolicited. Scholars submit their manuscript to
    any given journal on an open basis (unless a
    special thematic issue is planned where there are
    deadlines set for submission).
  • The Cover Letter is read/reviewed. This is to
    make sure the author(s) have both identified the
    section under which the submission applies, and
    stated that the manuscript represents results of
    original work, that the findings reported in the
    manuscript have not been published previously,
    and that the manuscript is not being
    simultaneously submitted elsewhere.
  • The editor (and associates) then determine
    whether or not to reject the submission outright.
    Most often this is on the grounds of not being
    appropriate to the subject or editorial scope of
    the given journal, or not written in the
    appropriate format/writing style or exhorberrant
    page length .

42
Q6 What is the typical Journal Review Process?
  • If the editors choose to consider the manuscript
    for possible publication, it is then subject to a
    blind peer-review process (by other scholars of
    the editors choosing).
  • There are typically at least two outside
    reviewers a third reviewer may sometimes be
    asked if the two disagree and there are
    conflicting reviews.
  • The feedback and comments of these outside
    reviewers are used by the editors in the final
    determination of whether to accept or reject the
    manuscript. This same feedback is returned to the
    authors with either a letter of rejection, letter
    to revise and resubmit, or letter of acceptance.
  • If accepted, articles are then subject to further
    (and sometimes considerable) editing by the
    journal editors before publication. Because this
    can be a lengthy process, an accepted article
    will generally not appear in print until several
    months at the very least to a whole year or more,
    after its initial submission.

43
                      Please return by
------ This
form is for your convenience. Conclusions can be
reported by check mark, but your comments are
particularly important. Feel free to add a sheet
if needed. Date ------
Manuscript -----
Manuscript Title ---------------------------
-------------------------------- Manuscript
Submitted to Section (circle) Feature
Articles     Essay Reviews Interviews       Voce
s          Book Media Reviews   
Alternative Formats Reviewer
--------------------------------------------------
----------------- 1. Recommend acceptance as is
(also please check a, b or c).         a. Major
contribution. b. Warrants publication.
c. Acceptable to publish if space is
plentiful. 2. Recommend acceptance with
reservation (please specify below).         a.
Not exceptionally important and/or substantial
b. Other 3. May be publishable with extensive
revisions and further review. 4. Recommend
rejection. With extensive revisions would
probably still be of borderline quality (please
check one or more of the following).      a.
Topic unsuitable (suggest another journal?). b.
Contributes nothing new.      c. Technically
deficient (specify). d. Other References 1.
Adequate. 2. Inadequate (add any suggestions
below). Format (APA), Style, Order and Elements,
etc (if applicable, and acceptance
recommended) 1. Well written, routine
editing. 2. Needs considerable editing
(please specify below). Comments
(confidential)    Comments (for author)  
JLE SAMPLE MANUSCRIPT REVIEW FORM
44
Para Los Niños
El Fin - Gracias
45
Workshop on Publishing Academic Books Dr.
Enrique G. Murillo, Jr. California State
University, San Bernardino March 8, 2007 Texas
Tech University - Sponsored by Helen DeVitt
Jones Lecturer Series
46
Q1 What about Books?
  • Some realities
  • Academic publishers dream of really profitable
    books.
  • One major reason why academic books get published
    at all is that many major university and research
    libraries will maintain standing orders to buy
    all or the majority the books from certain major
    publishers in particular fields. Since this
    represents a guaranteed market, the publishing
    companies can know exactly how big it is, and how
    long a prospective book they can afford to
    publish for that market, and make a profit.
  • Many such books will have a low reading
    circulation, remain at deep discount, or are
    tossed out by publishers. Many publishers don't
    even print more copies than they are sure will be
    taken by libraries and can potentially be out of
    print almost as soon as they are in print.

47
Q2 What are the Routes to a Marketable Book?
Generally, marketable books are by established
authors with major reputations.
  • But there are other routes to a book contract,
    and understanding that marketability greatly
    influences the acceptance of your prospectus,
    will increase this likelihood.
  • Publishers know that there are large markets in
    education-related topics.
  • They also know that a book that can be used in
    college courses, even advanced graduate levels.
  • The first intelligible book in a new field or
    cross-disciplinary subfield.
  • One that has practical uses, like explaining
    methodology or reviewing and comparing lesser
    known but significant theories.
  • One that applies a new approach to some
    well-known and widespread problem or issues.
  • One that has policy implications.
  • Or, a book that applies and in part popularizes
    the work of a well-known theorist in some new
    area.

48
Q3 Where do I start?
  • Academic publishers are always looking for good
    manuscripts.
  • It is not recommended to just send a manuscript
    to a publisher without prior discussions and
    negotiations.
  • In many cases, established reputable authors can
    get a book contract on the basis of a chapter
    outline and one or two sample chapters.
  • But new authors will likely not get a contract
    like this. Rather, just a letter of encouragement
    to submit the completed manuscript.
  • Acquisition editors hang out at professional
    conferences in the exhibit areas and they
    converse with scholars to keep current with
    what's going on.
  • Get your mentor or an established author you
    know, to introduce you to a publisher's
    representative.
  • Make a very, very sketchy suggestion of a
    possible topic you are writing about and drop in
    a few key buzzwords.
  • If they show any interest, get their business
    card, and follow up with a letter that contains a
    more detailed idea. Ask if they would like to see
    more before mailing your formal prospectus.

49
Q4 What is the typical Prospectus Review
Process? A successful first book makes you
very welcome at that publisher for your second
book. It may also make your work of interest to
other publishers.
  • Manuscripts are reviewed similarly to journal
    articles, but often not as stringent and not
    always necessarily blind peer-review.
  • It is harder to know what reviewers it will be
    sent to, but their current authors are likely,
    and major publishers also have favorite academic
    advisors, often known as "series editors".
  • It may be easier to actually pitch a book with a
    series editor than with the actual publisher.
  • Same thing pitch your ideas to a series editor
    at a professional conference. New series are
    usually looking for manuscripts.

50
Q5 How Do I Choose a Publisher?
  • Choose your publisher carefully.
  • What matters to academic publishers is marketing.
  • You want a publisher who will exhibit your book
    at conferences, mail out announcements of it,
    include it in widely distributed general
    mailings, and even place it in bookstores.
  • The point is not to get rich, the royalties are
    very small on these books. The point is to get
    your book read and known by more people.
  • Some publishers are also easier to get along with
    in the editorial offices than others, but this
    changes with personnel and should not be a major
    consideration except in extreme cases.
  • Some publishers also take a very long time to
    produce a book you wait your turn in a long list
    for publication. Marketability prospects move you
    up the waiting list. Big publishers are generally
    better for speed and marketing services than
    small ones, but small ones may give you more help
    and personal attention.

51
Q6 How do I Prepare a Book Publishing Proposal?
  • Publishers strive to understand the intent of,
    and audience for each book
  • A detailed statement of purpose (1-3 pages).
    Explain the objective and significance of the
    work.
  • An annotated outline, including a short narrative
    for each section that describes how each section
    contributes to the book. If the project is an
    edited volume, include the names and affiliations
    of the contributors. Indicate if any of this
    information is tentative.
  • Some representative material for the project such
    as a sample chapter. Send along a sample of
    previously published articles, book chapters,
    books, etc.
  • A resume or curriculum vitae.
  • An estimate of the length of the project in
    double-spaced manuscript pages.
  • A timeline and schedule for delivery of the final
    draft.
  • A brief description of special production issues
    such as art work, binding, etc.
  • An indication of whether you are submitting your
    proposal to a number of prospective publishers.
  • A sentence or two explaining why you are
    submitting your proposal to this particular
    publisher.

52
Q7 How do I Identify a Market?
  • Describe the intended audience for your work?
  • Is this audience mainly in the U.S. or is there a
    significant audience or professional interest
    outside the U.S.?
  • Where does this work fit in with what is already
    available (in terms of the competition)?
  • Who will the likely readers of this material be?
  • How will they use the material?
  • Does the approach taken in the book represent a
    departure from, or extension of, conventional
    wisdom? How will this contribute to the
    discipline?
  • Will the book be edited or authored? By whom? Is
    a table of contents available? Sample chapters?
    Abstracts of chapters?
  • What academic societies or sections of major
    societies will be most interested in this work?
  • What professional groups will be most interested
    in this work?
  • For what course or courses would your book most
    likely be adopted?

53
Para Los Niños
El Fin - Gracias
54
Extra Slides for Reference
55
EDITOR Enrique G. Murillo, Jr.      California
State University-San Bernardino ASSOCIATE
EDITORS Corinne Martínez     California State
University-San Bernardino Juan Sánchez Muñoz
    Texas Tech University-Lubbock Ruth Trinidad
Galván     University of New Mexico-Albuquerque So
fia A. Villenas     Cornell University-Ithaca     
                                                 
                                                  
                                                  
                               ADMINISTRATIVE
MANAGEMENT Department of Language, Literacy
Culture,    College of Education California State
University-San Bernardino Cathe Stevenson    
Fiscal Coordinator and Events Planner Mark
Leal     Office Manager Mario Valenzuela    
Assistant to the Editor Erika Bugarín   
Information and Resource Manager EXECUTIVE
COUNCIL Center for Equity in Education,
California State University-San Bernardino María
V. Balderrama Esteban Díaz Barbara Flores Juan
Gutiérrez  José Salvador Hernández Elsa Valdez  
JLE Masthead
56
EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD (Volume 5, 2006
through present) Alma Flor Ada     University
of San Francisco René Antrop-González
    University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Gilberto
Arriaza     San Jose State University Marta P.
Baltodano    Loyola Marymount University
Patricia Baquedano-López     University of
California-Berkeley Lilia Bartolomé    
University of Massachusetts-Boston Scott A.L.
Beck     Georgia Southern University Antonia
Darder     University of Illinois-Urbana
Champaign Concha Delgado Gaitan     Independent
Writer Lourdes Díaz Soto     Pennsylvania State
University Rubén Donato     University of
Colorado-Boulder Richard P. Durán     University
of California-Santa Barbara Bernardo Gallegos    
Washington State University-Pullman Eugene
Garcia     Arizona State University-Tempe Francisc
o Guajardo     University of Texas-Pan
American Pablo Jasis     Art, Research and
Curriculum Associates Donaldo Macedo    
University of Massachusetts-Boston Liliana
Minaya-Rowe     University of Connecticut-Storrs L
uis Mirón     University of Illinois-Urbana
Champaign Luis Moll     University of
Arizona-Tucson Martha Montero-Sieburth    
University of Massachusetts-Boston Sonia
Nieto     University of Massachusetts-Amherst Geor
ge W. Noblit     University of North
Carolina-Chapel Hill Pedro A. Noguera     New
York University Raymund A. Paredes     Texas
Higher Education Coordinating Board Pedro
Pedraza     City University of New YorkHunter
College Maria de la Luz Reyes     University of
Colorado-Boulder Guadalupe San Miguel, Jr.    
University of Houston Martha Soto     Los
Angeles Mission College Ricardo D.
Stanton-Salazar     University of Southern
California Marcelo M. Suárez-Orozco     New York
University Josefina V. Tinajero     University
of Texas-El Paso Luis Urrieta, Jr.     University
of California-Davis Stephanie Urso Spina    
State University New York-Cortland Richard
Valencia     University of Texas-Austin Angela
Valenzuela     University of Texas-Austin  
JLE Masthead
57
FEATURE ARTICLES THEORY, RESEARCH, POLICY AND
PRACTICE Parental Motivation, Attitudes, Support
and Commitment in a Southern Californian Two-Way
Immersion Program Rosalie Giacchino-Baker and
Bonnie Piller Social, Cultural and Political
Influences on the Development of an Educational
Partnership James R. Valadez Negotiating Our
Way through the Gates of Academe Michelle A.
Holling and Amardo Rodriguez Increasing the
College Preparedness of At-Risk Students Alberto
F. Cabrera, Regina Deil-Amen, Radhika Prabhu,
Patrick T. Terenzini, Chul Lee, and Robert E.
Franklin, Jr. Worlds Together . . . Words Apart
An Assessment of the Effectiveness of
Arts-Based Curriculum for Second Language
Learners Stephanie Urso Spina Against the
Grain Confronting Hispanic Service Organizations
in Times of Increasing Inequalities, 1930 and
2005 Linda Heidenreich Maestras, Mujeres y
Mas Creating Teacher Networks for Resistance
and Voice Theresa Montaño and Joyce
Burstein Accountability by Assumption
Implications of Reform Agendas for Teacher
Preparation Socorro G. Herrera and
Kevin G. Murry Assimilation vs.
Multiculturalism Bilingual Education and the
Latino Challenge Julia Burdick-Will
and Christina Gómez A Tribute to Thomas P.
Carter (1927 2001) Activist Scholar and
Pioneer in Mexican American Education Richard R.
Valencia Pensando en Cynthia y su hermana
Educational Implications of U.S./Mexico
Transnationalism for Children Edmund T. Hamann,
Víctor Zúñiga and Juan Sánchez García If the
student is good, let him fly Moral Support for
College among Latino Immigrant Parents
Susan Auerbach
Table of Contents VOLUME 5, 2006
58
ESSAYS AND INTERVIEWS Being Seen/Being Heard
moving beyond visibility in the academy Robert
J. Torres VOCES COMMUNITY, PARENTS, TEACHERS
AND STUDENTS Como si le Falta un Brazo Latino
Immigrant Parents and the Costs of Not Knowing
English Jo Worthy A Latina Teachers Journal
Reflections on Language, Culture, Literacy, and
Discourse Practices Mariana Souto-Manning BOOK
AND MEDIA REVIEWS Book Review Teaching Hispanic
Children by Toni Griego Jones and Mary Lou
Fuller Paul H. Matthews Gibson, M.A., Gándara,
P., Koyama, J.P. (Eds.) (2004). School
Connections U.S. Mexican Youth, Peers, and
School Achievement. New York Teachers College
Press. Mónica G. García Robert K. Ream. 2005.
Uprooting Children Mobility, Social Capital, and
Mexican American Underachievement. New York
LFB Scholarly Publishing LLC. Gilberto Q.
Conchas ALTERNATIVE FORMATS Language
Lessons Melisa Cahnmann A Teachers
Indispensable Qualities A Freirean
Perspective Douglas J. Simpson, Garrett H.
Boroda, Betsy L. Bucy, Alan Burke, Walter L.
Doue, Sharon L. Faber, Mary C. Fehr, Wesley A.
Fryer, Gregory D. Gonzales, Chasidy J.
Harp-Woods, Sarah McMahan, Suzanne M. Nesmith,
Sherri A. Reynolds, Sandra E. Riegle, Jacqueline
E. Romano, Ruby J. Willey, Saundra Wimberley,
and Mijin Won
Table of Contents VOLUME 5, 2006
59
FEATURE ARTICLES THEORY, RESEARCH, POLICY AND
PRACTICE The Impact of Brown on Mexican American
Desegregation Litigation, 1950s to
1980s Guadalupe San Miguel, Jr. Lessons From
La Maestra Miriam Developing Literate Identities
through Critical Literacy Teaching Leila
Flores Dueñas English Only The Creation and
Maintenance of an Academic Underclass Candace
Mitchell Accountability data and decision making
in Texas bilingual education programs Gordon S.
Gates and Kristi Lichtenberg An Introduction to
This Special Thematic Issue Zulmara Cline, María
de la Luz Reyes and Juan Necochea Teachers on
the Border In their own words María de la Luz
Reyes and Elizabeth Garza Queer Coyotes
Transforming education to be more accepting
affirming, and supportive of queer
individuals Gilbert Valadez and Anne René
Elsbree Border Pedagogy from the Inside Out An
autoethnographic study Jaime Romo Educating the
Burrito King John J. Halcón Dónde están los
estudiantes puertorriqueños/os exitosos Where
are the academically successful Puerto Rican
students? Success Factors of High Achieving
Puerto Rican High School Students René
Antrop-González, William Vélez, and Tomás
Garrett Ethnic Identity and Academic Achievement
among Latino and Latina Adolescents Maria Estela
Zarate, Fazila Bhimji, and Leslie
Reese Students Ratings of Professors The
Teaching Style Contingency for Latino
Professors Gabriel Smith and Kristin J.
Anderson Transnational Communities En La Lucha
Campesinas and Grassroots Organizations
Globalizing from Below Ruth Trinidad
Galván Latinos in a College Outreach Program
Application, Selection, and Participation Jill
Denner, Catherine R. Cooper, Nora Dunbar and
Edward M. Lopez Educational Barriers for New
Latinos in Georgia Stephanie A. Bohon, Heather
Macpherson and Jorge H. Atiles
Table of Contents VOLUME 4, 2005
60
ESSAYS AND INTERVIEWS Pionera in the Linguistic
Borderlands Conversations with Emily Palacio,
Calexico, California María V.
Balderrama VOCES COMMUNITY, PARENTS, TEACHERS
AND STUDENTS Entre la Espalda y la Pared
Critical Educators, Bilingual Education, and
Education Reform Edward M. Olivos and Carmen
E. Quintana de Valladolid Círculo de Lectura
Colegio Monseñor Francisco Beckmann, una
experiencia diferente. Wilfredo Juárez
Estrada BOOK AND MEDIA REVIEWS Book Review Poor
Latino families and school preparation Are they
doing the right things? by W.A.
Sampson Deirdre Martinez Book Review Las hijas
de Juan Daughters betrayed by Josie
Méndez-Negrete Norma L. Cárdenas Excavating
Education Policy in the New South Book Review
of The Educational Welcome of Latinos in the New
South by Edmund T. Hamann Sheryl Greenwood
Gowen ALTERNATIVE FORMATS The Pain of
Injustice Myriam N. Torres
Table of Contents VOLUME 4, 2005
61
FEATURE ARTICLES THEORY, RESEARCH, POLICY AND
PRACTICE Bridging a Continuum Normalista
Professionals and Mexican American
Paraprofessionals Speak About Culture Josephine
Méndez-Negrete and Lilliana P. Saldaña Newspaper
Editorial Response to Californias
Post-Proposition 227 Test Scores René
Galindo Welcome to the Front Seat Racial
Identity and Mesoamerican Immigrants Gilberto
Arriaza Searching for Curanderas A Quest to
Revive Chicana/o Studies Marcos
Pizarro Hispanic/Latino Fathers and Childrens
Literacy Development Examining Involvement
Practices from a Sociocultural Context Robert W.
Ortiz The Tyranny of Democracy Deconstructing
the Passage of Racist Propositions Zulmara
Cline, Juan Necochea and Francisco Rios Si Se
Puede! Academic Excellence and Bilingual
Competency in a K-8 Two-Way Dual Immersion
Program Rosalinda Quintanar-Sarellana Learning
from Cross-University Collaboration and Research
A Greek Tragedy in Three Acts Carmen I.
Mercado Training Teachers of English Language
Learners Using Their Students First
Language Liliana Minaya-Rowe First Steps in the
Development of the Inventario de Comportamiento
de Estudio The Spanish Version of the Study
Behavior Inventory Leonard B. Bliss and Diana
Maria Alejandra Vinay Cooperative Learning in
Higher Education Hispanic and Non-Hispanic
Undergraduates Reflections on Group
Grades Bobbette M. Morgan
Table of Contents VOLUME 3, 2004
62
ESSAYS AND INTERVIEWS TO THE MARGINS AND BACK
THE HIGH COST OF BEING LATINA IN
'AMERICA' Myriam N. Torres VOCES COMMUNITY,
PARENTS, TEACHERS AND STUDENTS IEP Meetings and
Mexican American Parents Lets talk about
it Loretta Salas Reaching Beyond Borders
Through Service Learning Terri M. Carney Rising
with De Colores Tapping into the Resources of la
Comunidad to Assist Under- Performing
Chicano/Latino Students Rosario Ordoñez-Jasis
and Pablo Jasis BOOK AND MEDIA REVIEWS Las
Tejanas 300 Years of History by Teresa Palomo
Acosta and Ruthe Winegarten Nancy Porras Hein
Book Review Chicano School Failure and Success
Past Present and Future (2nd edition) by
Richard R. Valencia Iliana Alanís ALTERNATIVE
FORMATS The Backstage(s) of Mentorship Marie
Sarita Gaytán
Table of Contents VOLUME 3, 2004
63
FEATURE ARTICLES THEORY, RESEARCH, POLICY AND
PRACTICE Imaging Teachers In Fact and In the
Mass Media Xaé Alicia Reyes and Diana I. Rios.
Missing in Action Reconstructing Hope and
Possibility among Latino Students Placed at Risk
Maria D. Martinez Surviving the "Perfect
Storm" Bilingual Education Policy-Making in
New York City Luis O. Reyes Teachers'
(Re)Constructions of knowledge The other Side of
Fieldwork Xaé Alicia Reyes When Education,
Media and Technology Converge What do Latina/o
Students Gain? Dolores Valencia Tanno The
Latin Grammys and the Almas Awards Programs,
Cultural Epideictic and the Intercultural
Pedagogy Alberto González and Amy N.
Heuman U.S. Latino Audiences of Telenovelas
Diana I. Ríos Sugar Beets, Segregation,
and Schools Mexican Americans in a Northern
Colorado Community, 1920-1960 Rubén
Donato Latina Educators and School Discourse
Dealing with Tension on the Path to Success
Jill A. Aguilar, Laurie MacGillivray, and Nancy
T. Walker When Helping Someone Else Is the
Right Answer Bridging Cultures in
Assessment Carrie Rothstein-Fisch, Elise
Trumbull, Adrienne Isaac, Catherine Daley, and
Amada Irma Pérez Mesocentrism and Students of
Mexican Background A Community Intervention for
Culturally Relevant Instruction Heriberto
Godina Acquiring and participating in the use
of academic Spanish Four novice Latina
bilingual education teachers stories Michael
D. Guerrero Estudia para que no te pase lo que
a mi narrativas culturales sobre el valor de la
escuela en familias mexicanas Claudia Saucedo
Ramos Do Hispanic-Serving Institutions have what
it takes to foster information literacy? One
case Anne C. Moore and Gary Ivory
Table of Contents VOLUME 2, 2003
64
ESSAYS AND INTERVIEWS A Visionary Latin American
Preschool Educator A Conversation with Franklin
Martínez Dean Cristol Testimonios de
Inmigrantes Students Educating Future
Teachers M. Saray González, Oscar Plata, Erika
García, Mario Torres, and Luis Urrieta,
Jr. VOCES COMMUNITY, PARENTS, TEACHERS AND
STUDENTS Mexican American Parent Participation
and Administrative Leadership Nancy Porras Hein
BOOK AND MEDIA REVIEWS Book Review Hispanic
Education in the United States Raíces y Alas by
Eugene E. García Juan Sánchez Muñoz Book
Review The Latino Student's Guide to College
Success by Leonard A. Valverde.(editor) Louie F.
Rodríguez Manufacturing Hope and Despair The
School and Kin Support Networks of U.S.- Mexican
Youth by Ricardo Stanton-Salazar Melissa
Moreno Why Dont They Learn English?
Separating Fact from Fallacy in the U.S. Language
Debate by Lucy Tse Grace Cho and Debra
DeCastro-Ambrosetti Contextualizing Literature
by Mexican-American Women Writers A Review of
Caramelo Patricia Benjumea ALTERNATIVE
FORMATS El carácter esencial del conocimiento de
acuerdo a un neófito Angela López
Pedrana Untitled Poem Sandra Valles-Metzger
Table of Contents VOLUME 2, 2003
65
FEATURE ARTICLES THEORY, RESEARCH, POLICY AND
PRACTICE Multiple Ethnic, Racial and Cultural
Identities in Action from Marginality to a New
Cultural Capital in Modern Society Henry T.
Trueba Caught in a Policy Web The Impact of
Education Reform on Latino Education Jill Kerper
Mora "Mexican Americans Don't Value Education!"
On the Basis of the Myth, Mythmaking, and
Debunking Richard R. Valencia and Mary S.
Black You're just a kid that's there Chicano
Perception of Disciplinary Events Rosa Hernández
Sheets Dropout Prevention How Migrant
Education Supports Mexican Youth Margaret A.
Gibson and Livier F. Bejínez Family Matters
Related to the Reading Engagement of Latino
Children Angela Arzubiaga, Robert Rueda and
Lilia Monzó A Critical Race Analysis of Advance
Placement Classes A Case of Educational
Inequality Daniel G. Solórzano and Armida
Ornelas ESSAYS AND INTERVIEWS Participatory
Action Research in Education The National
Latino/a Education Research Agenda
Project Pedro Pedraza Learning to Forget
Reflections on Identity and Language Benjamin
Baez Whose Lady of Guadalupe? Indigenous
Performances, Latina/o Identities and the
Postcolonial Project Bernardo P. Gallegos The
Cultural Legacy of Self-consciousness an
Interview with Lourdes Portillo Juan
Velasco VOCES COMMUNITY, PARENTS, TEACHERS AND
STUDENTS In Search of Bedrock Organizing For
Success with Diverse Needs Children in the
Classroom Priscilla Shannon Gutiérrez Strugglin
g toward Culturally Relevant Pedagogy in the
Latino Diaspora Stanton Wortham and Margaret
Contreras Lessons From the First Grade Sharon
Adelman Reyes Middle School Mathematics
Classrooms A Place for Latina Parents
Involvement Cynthia Oropesa Anhalt , Martha
Allexsaht-Snider, and Marta Civil
Table of Contents VOLUME 1, 2002
66
BOOK AND MEDIA REVIEWS Effective Programs For
Latino Students, by Slavin, Robert E. Calderón,
Margarita (eds.) Marilyn Antonucci La Otra
Conquista, by Carrasco and Domingo Film
Productions Luis Urrieta Jr. and Oliva
Martínez Children of Immigration by
Suarez-Orozco, C. Suarez-Orozco, M. Adela de
la Torre Democracy, Education and
Multiculturalism Dilemmas of Citizenship in a
Global World by Carlos Alberto Torres (Spanish
edition Democracia, Educación y
Multiculturalismo Dilemas de la Ciudadanía en
un Mundo Global) Armando Alcantara Illegal
Alphabets and Adult Biliteracy Latino Migrants
Crossing the Linguistic Border By Tomás Mario
Kalmar Peter Lownds The Power of Community
Mobilizing for Family and Schooling by Concha
Delgado- Gaitán Lilia Monzó ALTERNATIVE
FORMATS In-Just-Us (Injustice) Celestina
Castrejón de Rasmussen Educadores / Educators,
Sangre Hugo Moreno Tracks Rolando J.
Diaz Mister Rogers Neighborhood Claudia Rosa
Silva
Table of Contents VOLUME 1, 2002
67
HLE Masthead
  • EDITOR
  • Enrique G. Murillo, Jr.      California State
    University-San Bernardino
  • ASSOCIATE EDITORS
  • Sofia A. Villenas     Cornell University-
    Ithaca Ruth Trinidad Galván      University of
    New Mexico-Albuquerque Juan Sánchez
    Muñoz     Texas Tech University-Lubbock Corinne
    Martínez      California State University-San
    Bernardino Margarita Machado-Casas     University
    of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
  • SECTION EDITORS
  • Douglas E. Foley     University of
    Texas-Austin Norma E. González     University of
    Utah-Salt Lake City Eugene García     Arizona
    State University-Tempe Esteban Díaz     
    California State University-San Bernardino
  • ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGEMENT
  • Department of Language, Literacy Culture,   
    College of Education
  • California State University-San Bernardino
  • Cathe Stevenson     Fiscal Coordinator and Events
    Planner
  • Mark Leal     Office Manager
  • Mario Valenzuela     Assistant to the Editor
  • Erika Bugarín    Information and Resource Manager
  • ACQUISITIONS / PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT
  • Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.

68
HLE Masthead

  • ADVISORY BOARD
  • Alma Flor Ada     University of San Francisco  
  • René Antrop-González     University of
    Wisconsin-Milwaukee
  • Gilberto Arriaza     San Jose State University
  • Alfredo Artiles       Arizona State University
  • María V. Balderrama     California State
    University-San Bernardino
  • Marta P. Baltodano    Loyola Marymount University
  • Patricia Baquedano-López     University of
    California-Berkeley
  • Lilia Bartolomé     University of
    Massachusetts-Boston
  • Scott A.L. Beck     Georgia Southern University
  • Ruth Behar     University of MichiganAnn Arbor
  • Ursula Casanova    Arizona State University
  • Rudolfo Chávez Chávez         New Mexico State
    University
  • Antonia Darder     University of Illinois-Urbana
    Champaign
  • Dolores Delgado Bernal      University of Utah
  • Rubén Donato     University of Colorado-Boulder
  • Richard P. Durán     University of
    California-Santa Barbara
  • Barbara Flores     California State
    University-San Bernardino

69
HLE Masthead

  • ADVISORY BOARD (cont.)
  • Luis Mirón     University of Illinois-Urbana
    Champaign
  • Luis Moll     University of Arizona-Tucson
  • Martha Montero-Sieburth     University of
    Massachusetts-Boston
  • Sonia Nieto     University of Massachusetts-Amhers
    t
  • Pedro A. Noguera     New York University
  • Carlos Ovando         Arizona State University
  • Raymond V. Padilla      University of Texas - San
    Antonio
  • Raymund A. Paredes     Texas Higher Education
    Coordinating Board
  • Pedro Pedraza     City University of New
    YorkHunter College
  • Laura Rendón     Iowa State University
  • Maria de la Luz Reyes     University of
    Colorado-Boulder
  • Robert Rueda     University of Southern
    California
  • Guadalupe San Miguel, Jr.     University of
    Houston
  • Armando Sanchez     Latino Scholastic Achievement
    Corporation
  • Sheryl Santos          Texas Tech-Lubbock
  • Daniel Solorzano     University of California at
    Los Angeles
  • Martha Soto     Los Angeles Mission College

70
SECTION I Theoretical and Methodological
Approaches Sofia A. Villenas, Associate
Editor Douglas E. Foley, Section
Editor Introductory Chapter to Section I Will
offer a synthesis of the various individual
chapters, their collective and coordinated
contribution to the field of Latinos and
Education, and a general framework within which
the chapters function to contribute to an overall
understanding. Comments This chapter will begin
by situating and naming the most pressing,
persistent and pervasive issues in Latino
Education today. It will then offer a synthesis
of the various section chapters and a general
framework within which the chapters function to
explore how contemporary educational issues are
addressed, and have been addressed historically
through research grounded in unique theoretical
and methodological approaches. Further While
the other sections of this handbook target very
specific issues/ research, we felt that the
purpose of this section is to tell an overall
story about Latino education. Specifically this
section details the story of a people, a history
of educational inequality and educational
persistence and attainment it tells the story of
how we have developed our diverse conceptual
lens, how we have created new and hybrid
theories it tells the story of the methodologies
we have employed to produce a wealth of knowledge
for educational practice and policy. So this new
version of the section does not privilege certain
theories (e.g., a chapter on LatCrit in
education, a chapter on social capital theory,
etc.) and the particular authors who might work
in those domains. Rather, this section is about
stepping back and seeing how all the pieces of
the puzzle fit together, including how the
contradictions and tensions work against/with one
another. Latinas/os in the United States An
Overview
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