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Principal Leadership in PLCs

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Title: Building a Professional Learning Community Author: nsd210l Last modified by: susan.huff Created Date: 9/26/2006 5:40:00 PM Document presentation format – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Principal Leadership in PLCs


1
Principal Leadership in PLCs
  • Lakeville Administrative Academy
  • November 2, 2012
  • Susan Huff
  • susan.huff_at_nebo.edu

2
Two Objectives
  • Learn how to overcome barriers to school
    improvement.
  • Learn how to mentor instructional teams.

3
Norms for Us
  • Listen to learn and apply.
  • Participate fully and respect confidentiality.
  • Focus pay attention to signal.

4
Transforming a school to a PLC is a journey that
takes time and effort.
5
  • What Is a PLC?
  • educators committed to working
    collaboratively in ongoing processes of
    collective inquiry and action research in order
    to achieve better results for the students they
    serve. PLCs operate under the assumption that the
    key to improved learning for students is
    continuous, job-embedded learning for educators.
  • DuFour, DuFour, Eaker, Many
    (2006)

6
Why PLCs?
  • Throughout our ten-year study, whenever we
    found an effective school or an effective
    department within a school, without exception
    that school or department has been a part of a
    collaborative professional learning community.
    (Milbrey McLaughlin)

7
Characteristics of a PLC
  • Shared mission, vision, values, and goals
  • Collaborative teams focused on learning
  • Collective inquiry into best practice and current
    reality
  • Action orientation and experimentation
  • Commitment to continuous improvement
  • Results orientation
  • (DuFour Eaker, 1998)

8
3 Big Ideas of a PLC
  • Unwavering focus on student learning
  • Collaborative teaming
  • A results orientation

  • (DuFour Eaker, 1998)

9
Four Crucial Questions
  • What do we want each student to learn?
  • How we will know when each student has learned
    it?
  • How will we respond when a student experiences
    difficulty in learning?
  • How can we enrich and extend their learning when
    they already know it?

    (DuFour, 2006)

10
What is building a PLC?
  • Building a school culture of continuous
    improvement in
  • teaching and learning

11
Barriers to School Improvement
  • Heres what . . .
  • Heres why . . .
  • Heres how . . .

12
Barriers
  • Changing the existing school culture
  • Changing the power structure in the school
  • Overcoming inertia to perform the hard work of
    school improvement
  • Dealing with resistance
  • Finding time for training and collaboration
  • Sustaining progress
  • (Huff, 2007)

13
Heres What . . .
  • 1. Changing the existing school culture.
  • Transforming a school to a PLC is about shifting
    the existing culture.

14
School Culture
  • School culture includes the rituals,
    traditions, and ceremonies that are symbols of
    what is important, valued, and significant.
  • (Deal Peterson, 1999)

15
The culture in a learning community recognizes
and capitalizes on the collective strengths and
talents of the staff. (Shellard, 2003)
16
  • Trust and respect among colleagues is essential.
  • Trust centers on respect, personal regard,
    competence, and personal integrity.
  • (Bryk Schneider, 2003)

17
Heres Why . . .
  • PLC culture focuses on learning,
  • not teaching.
  • PLC culture has an unwavering focus
  • on student learning.
  • PLC culture supports collaborative teaming.
  • PLC culture has a results orientation.

18
Heres How . . .
  • Get the right people on the bus.
  • Get the right people on the bus in the
  • right seats.
  • Get the wrong people off the bus.
  • If you cant get the wrong people off
  • the bus, make sure theyre not in the drivers
    seat.
  • (Collins, 2001)

19
Heres How . . .
  • Preserve the core. Stimulate progress.
  • Try a lot of stuff and keep what works.
  • (Collins Porras, 1994, p.
    140)
  • Make reflective practice a habit of mind and
    practice.
  • Align all practices with the schools vision.

20
Heres How . . .
  • Use the hedgehog concept Take the complexities
    of school and boil them down
  • to simple, yet profound ideas that reflect
    penetrating insight and deep understanding.
  • Confront the brutal facts.
  • (Collins, 2001)

21
Heres How Create Norms
  • Norms clarify how we -
  • Work and produce results.
  • Solve problems.
  • Disagree and challenge ideas.
  • Make decisions.
  • Interact, participate, and celebrate.
  • Treat each other.
  • (See norm examples)

22
Heres What . . .
  • 2. Changing the Power Structure in the
    School

23
Scribner and colleagues (1999) found the most
important facilitating or impeding factor in the
development of professional learning communities
was the role of the principal.
24
  • When youre finished changing, youre finished.
  • Benjamin Franklin

25
  • A professional learning community culture does
    not solely depend on principal leadership.
  • Richard Elmore (2004) stated that distributed
    leadership capitalizes on concerted action among
    people with different areas of expertise and a
    mutual respect that stems from an appreciation of
    the knowledge and skill requirements of different
    roles. (p. 87)

26
PLC Leadership
  • Widely dispersed
  • Reciprocal accountability
  • Clear communication
  • (DuFour, Associates Retreat, 2007)

27
Heres How . . .
  • Manipulate group size to increase receptivity to
    new ideas.
  • Tinker with the presentation of information.
  • Find ways to reach a few key people who hold
    social power in the school.
  • (Gladwell, 2002)

28
Heres What . . .
  • 3. Overcoming inertia to perform the hard work of
    school improvement

29
  • Nothing ever comes to one that is worth having,
    except as a result of hard work.
  • Booker T. Washington

30
Heres Why . . .
  • It is challenging to set goals, determine
    crucial concepts, map the curriculum, and develop
    common assessments.

31
Heres How . . .
  • Take action move forward.
  • Continue to build shared knowledge.
  • Reflect on whats working.
  • Use the power of the Flywheel Effect.
  • (Collins, 2001)

32
Heres What . . .
  • 4. Dealing with resistance building consensus
  • Resistance to change
  • from mindless precedent

33
Heres Why . . .
  • Culture shifts may result in resistance
  • Changing from a focus on teaching to a focus on
    learning
  • Changing from a culture of teacher isolation to a
    culture of collaboration
  • Changing from I think . . . I feel to
    evidence-based results

34
Heres How . . .
  • Attitudes follow behavior.
  • People accept new beliefs as a result of changing
    their behavior.
  • Action influences talk more than talk influences
    action.
  • Embed more of the process of acquiring new
    knowledge into doing the task and less in formal
    training programs.
  • (Pfeffer Sutton, 2000)

35
Heres How . . .
  • Build consensus.
  • Create a guiding coalition.
  • Build shared knowledge.
  • Engage in dialogue with staff members in small
    groups to listen to and address concerns.
  • (DuFour, DuFour, Eaker, Many,
    2006, p. 164)

36
  • Continuum for determining if consensus has been
    reached
  • We have arrived at consensus in our school when
  • All of us can embrace the proposal.
  • All of us can endorse the proposal.
  • All of us can live with the proposal.
  • All of us can agree not to sabotage
  • the proposal.
  • We have a majorityat least 51
  • in support of the proposal.
  • (DuFour, DuFour, Eaker,
    Many, Learning by Doing, 2006, p. 165)

37
  • A Better Definition of Consensus
  • A group has arrived at consensus when
  • All points of view have been heard.
  • The will of the group is evident even to those
    who most oppose it.
  • (DuFour, DuFour, Eaker, Many,
    Learning by Doing, 2006, p. 165)

38
  • The Need to Confront
  • Nothing will destroy the credibility of a
    leader faster than the unwillingness to address
    an obvious violation of what the organization
    contends is vital. A leader must not remain
    silent he or she must not be unwilling to act
    when people disregard the purpose and priorities
    of the organization.
  • (DuFour, DuFour, Eaker,
    Many, Learning by Doing, 2006, p. 168)

39
Heres How . . .
  • When persuasion and consensus building dont
    work, direct confrontation may be needed to
    change someones mind.
  • Assertiveness over passivity When someone is
    more concerned about being liked than with
    getting the job done right, and so tolerates poor
    performance rather than confronting it.
  • (Goleman, 1998, p. 190)

40
Heres How . . .
  • Dont focus on attitude focus on behavior.
  • When work is designed to require people to act
    in new ways, this can result in new experiences,
    which can lead to the possibility of new
    attitudes over time. (Pfeffer
    Sutton, 2000)

41
Teams Get Stuck
  • Teams may lose sight of the schools vision for
    improvement.

42
Heres How . . .
  • Changing behavior -
  • 1. The great persuader is personal
    experience.
  • Confront the brutal facts.
  • Create a surrogate for actual experience.
  • Create profound vicarious experiences.
  • Use stories to help change minds.
  • Is there an ability or motivation issue?
  • (Patterson, Grenny, Maxfield, McMillan,
    Switzler, 2005)

43
Six Sources of Motivation
44
Heres How . . .
  • Hold a crucial confrontation to hold another
    person accountable for a broken promise, a
    violated expectation, or bad behavior.
  • Decide what and if (use CPR).
  • Master my stories.
  • Describe the gap.
  • (Patterson, Grenny, McMillan, Switzler,
    2005)

45
Heres What . . .
  • 5. Finding time for training and collaboration

46
Heres Why . . .
  • Improving schools requires collaborative
    cultures. Without collaborative skills and
    relationships, it is not possible to learn and to
    continue to learn as much as you need to know to
    improve.
  • (Fullan, 1993)

47
Heres Why . . .
  • Continuing to build shared knowledge through
    staff development helps a PLC move forward.
  • Enhanced teaching and learning result from
    collaboration.

48
Heres How . . .
  • Make time for collaboration and time
  • for staff development priorities.
  • Schedule time.
  • (Simple Ways Schools Find Time to Work
    Together)

49
Heres What . . .
  • 6. Sustaining progress

50
Heres Why . . .
  • Continued mentoring helps team progress.
  • New staff need to build shared knowledge.
  • School leadership changes.

51
  • A focus on learning
  • With collaborative teams.
  • Results orientation
  • Theyre our schools dreams.
  • We intervene early
  • With more time and support.
  • Theres curriculum mapping
  • On which we consort.

52
  • Teams common assessments
  • Every student will take.
  • We analyze data,
  • Then decisions we make.
  • A focus on learning.
  • Youre on a great team.
  • Results orientation
  • Its not just a dream!

53
Heres How . . .
  • Make PLCs institutionalizedthe way we do things
    around here.
  • Apply disciplined action (Collins, 2001)
  • A do-to list
  • A stop-doing list
  • Focus on the right things.

54
Structural Conditions
  • Establish trust and respect
  • Trust builds around respect, personal regard,
    competence, and
  • personal integrity.
  • (Bryk Schneider,
    2003)

55
  • Build social relationships
  • (McLaughlin Talbert, 2001 Louis, Marks,
    Kruse, 1996)
  • Promote an interdependent work structure
  • (Newmann Wehlage, 1995 Kruse, Louis, Bryk,
    1994)

56
1 An Unwavering Focus on Student Learning
  • Identify academic standards (Reeves, 2005)
  • Set high expectations (Newmann Wehlage, 1995
    Sebring Bryk, 1996 Shouse, 1996 Scribner
    Reyes, 1999)
  • Facilitate a common curriculum (McLaughlin
    Talbert, 2001 Lee, Smith, Croninger, 1995
    Newmann Wehlage, 1995)

57
  • Develop common assessments (DuFour, 2004)
  • Ensure confirmed practice
    (McLaughlin Talbert,
    2001)
  • Create systems of intervention prevention
  • (DuFour, DuFour, Eaker, Many, 2006)
  • Monitor student progress
  • (Waters, Marzano, McNulty, 2003)

58
2 Collaborative Teaming
  • Provide time for collaboration (Turk, Wolff,
    Waterbury, Zumalt, 2002 Kruse, Louis, Bryk,
    1994)
  • Facilitate job embedded staff development
    (DuFour, 2001, Kelleher, 2003)
  • Develop collective capacity (DuFour, 2001
    Senge, 1995)

59
  • Promote inquiry
  • (Fullan, 1993, Dufour, 2000 McLaughlin
    Talbert, 2001)
  • Promote shared personal practice
  • (McLaughlin Talbert, 2001 Louis Kruse,
    1995)
  • Build shared knowledge through collective
    learning (Morrissey, 2000 Senge, 1990)

60
  • Promote reflection and personal growth (Blase
    Blase, 1999)
  • Refine collaboration over time (Huff, 2007)
  • Create norms
  • (Scribner, Cockrell, Cockrell, Valentine,
    1999 Camburn Louis, 1999)

61
3 A Results Orientation
  • Manage data (Schmoker, 1999)
  • To change data to information, we need a basis
    of comparison.
  • Data must be easily accessible.
  • Data must be openly shared.
  • (DuFour, Dufour, Eaker)
  • Generate and expect tangible products (DuFour,
    DuFour, Eaker, Many, 2006)

62
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63
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64
Team collaboration binder
  • Team Norms
  • Facilitator/Scribe Assignments
  • Teams Daily Schedule
  • Collaboration Agenda (one for each weeks
    collaboration)
  • Curriculum Maps
  • Essential Learning Outcomes (or Power Standards)
  • Copy of Core Curriculum
  • Copies of Teams Common Assessments

65
Nebos Non-Negotiables for all schools . . . all
teams
  • Team Norms
  • I Can Statements for Student Learning
  • Common Curriculum Map
  • Common Formative Assessment for Each
  • I Can Statement
  • Data Assessment
  • SMART Goals

66
Leadership for Improvement
  • Build consensus (DuFour, 2000)
  • Respond to resistance
  • (DuFour, DuFour, Eaker, Many, 2006)
  • Manage change (Fullan, 1993)
  • Communicate clearly
  • (McLaughlin Talbert, 2001)

67
  • Overcome barriers (Huff, 2007)
  • Mentor teachers (Huff, 2007)
  • Start small (Huff, 2007)
  • Practice innovation (Huff, 2007)

68
  • Overcome barriers (Huff, 2007)
  • Mentor teachers (Huff, 2007)
  • Start small (Huff, 2007)
  • Practice innovation (Huff, 2007)

69
  • Expect behavior that leads to attitude change
  • (DuFour, DuFour, Eaker, Many, 2006)
  • Use loose / tight leadership simultaneously
  • (Collins Porras, 1994 DuFour Eaker, 1998)
  • Model reciprocal accountability (Elmore, 2004)
  • Share leadership
  • (Elmore, 2004 Sergiovanni, 2005 Senge, 1990
    Morrissey, 2000 Hord, 1997 McLaughlin
    Talbert, 2001)

70
From my experience . . .
  • Monitor the work of teams guide teach
  • Expect differences in teams in schools (based on
    deep conceptual understanding of PLCs)

71
  • Anticipate imperfection with improvement
  • Expect different levels of progress among teams
  • Acknowledge celebrate success

72
  • Our greatest danger in life is in permitting
    the urgent things to crowd out the important.
  • Charles E. Hummel

73
  • Things that matter most must never be at the
    mercy of things that matter least.
  • Goethe

74
Take Action!
  • Leaders tendency to delay or avoid action is
    one of the single greatest barriers to advancing
    on the continuum of change. Being willing to take
    steps, however halting, is an absolute
    prerequisite for school improvement.
  • (DuFour, 2003, p. 1)

75
  • There are many ways of going forward, but only
    one way of standing still.
  • Franklin D. Roosevelt

76
  • Analysis paralysis may stop us from moving
    forward.
  • Change is delayed, as perfection remains the
    enemy of progress, while toxic and ineffective
    practices remain entrenched.
  • (Peters Waterman,1982, p.
    232)

77
Take courage!
  • It takes courage to
  • Change school culture.
  • Confront resistors.
  • Overcome barriers.
  • Challenge the status quo.
  • Take risks.
  • Step out.
  • Take action when it would be easier to sit back
    and wait, or take no action at all.
  • (Huff, 2007)

78
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