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Principles of Education

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New teachers can prepare ... Attitude. 9/17/07 * Attitude and Behavior Attitude Comfort Preparation 9/17/07 * Attitude and Behavior Attitude Commitment 9/17/07 ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Principles of Education


1
Principles of Education
  • for the
  • Co

2
Principles of Education
Tell me and I will forget, Show me and I will
remember, Let me do and I will understand. Co
nfucius
3
Principles of Education
Too much challenge and our students miss the
sweet taste of success. Too little challenge
and we dishonor them with low standards.
John Gookin
4
Principles of Education
Genius is 10 talent and 90 hard work Albert
Einstein Teaching is similar Part science.
Part art.
5
Science and Art
  • Teachers discipline themselves to master the
    basics.
  • Techniques are rehearsed until they are mastered.
  • Teaching is ongoing effort of continuous
    self-improvement.
  • Master Educators are students of education.

6
Attitude and Behavior
  • Attitude is the single most important aspect to
    ensure effectiveness.
  • Keys to success.
  • Enjoy the activity.
  • Belief the material.
  • Enjoy working with people.

7
Attitude and Behavior
  • KSA
  • Knowledge .
  • Skills.
  • Attitude.

8
Attitude and Behavior
  • Attitude

Comfort
Preparation
9
Attitude and Behavior
  • Attitude

Commitment
10
Attitude and Behavior
  • Behavior
  • Consistent with message.
  • Model the skills and techniques be taught.
  • Model the attitude you wish to instill.

11
Attitude and Behavior
  • Self analysis
  • Have I developed good rapport with the audience
    friendly, genuine, interactive?
  • Have I shown enthusiasm for the subject and
    learning process?
  • Have I used personal experiences appropriately?

12
Attitude and Behavior
  • Self Analysis
  • Have I answered questions with care, even if the
    answer is, I dont know, but Ill try to find
    out.?
  • Have I helped participants get excited about
    learning?
  • Have I instilled a caring attitude towards the
    outdoors through modeling?

13
Principles of Education
Emotions drive attention. Attention drives
memory, learning and problem solving and just
about everything else.
14
Learning Styles
  • Visual
  • Auditory
  • Kinesthetic
  • Neuro-Linguistic Programming Model.

15
Learning Styles
  • Neuro-Linguistic Programming Meta Model.
  • Connects language to experience.
  • The student senses the information from the
    teacher.
  • The information is connected to the students
    experience using a learning style.

16
Learning Styles
  • Visual
  • Auditory
  • Kinesthetic
  • Olfactory
  • Gustatory

17
Learning Styles
Rapport
Some studies indicated 15 of message results
from the meaning of the words.
18
Learning Styles
  • We retain
  • 10 of what we read.
  • 20 of what we hear.
  • 30 of what we see.
  • 50 of what we see and hear.
  • 70 of what we say.
  • 90 of what we say and do.

19
Learning Styles
  • Say less, mean more.
  • Attention span is 10 minutes.
  • Periods of silence are important.

20
Learning Styles
  • Learning is accomplished by a coordinated use of
    all our senses.
  • Learning is best accomplished when teaching
    styles are varied.

21
Learning Styles
  • Analyze the audience.
  • What is the age range?
  • What is their cultural/religious background?
  • What do the individual know about the
    organization you represent?
  • What is their experience with the subject?

22
Learning Styles
  • Analyze the audience.
  • How does the audience feel? Tired? Bored?
    Excited? Nervous? Cold? Hot?
  • What is their level of interest in what you have
    to say?
  • What other factors will affect their capacity to
    learn?

23
Learning Styles
  • When presenting
  • Continual monitor the audience.
  • Be flexible. Adjust the message to maximize the
    learning.
  • Note the energy level and enthusiasm.
  • Watch the questions or lack of questions.

24
Learning Styles
  • Classroom Management
  • Panic kills. Sit down, relax and think.
  • Education is enhanced by challenge but inhibited
    by stress.
  • Cortisol interferes with learning and memory.

25
Learning Styles
  • Self Analysis
  • What have I done to help the participants relax?
    Are they hydrated and well-fed? Do they feel
    safe (safe asking questions, accepted for who
    they are)?
  • Is everyone comfortably seated?

26
Learning Styles
  • Self Analysis
  • Can they see you? Can they hear you? Is the sun
    in their eyes?
  • Are environmental factors (wind, cold, a rushing
    stream, etc.) a distraction that can be avoided?
    Also ask yourself, have I chosen an
    environmentally acceptable site for teaching?

27
Learning Styles
  • Neuro-Linguistic Programming Model Stages of
    Learning.
  • Unconscious Incompetence.
  • Conscious Incompetence.
  • Conscious Competence.
  • Unconscious Competence.

28
Teaching Methods
  • Almost any method of teaching will work if the
    quality of the teacher student relationship is
    high.

29
Teaching Methods
  • Multiple methods. You choose.
  • Subject matter, audience, setting, duration,
    group size, and instructor comfort level all
    should be considered in selecting the method.
  • Creativity and willingness to try new methods.

30
Teaching Methods
  • Lecture
  • Efficient. Visual aids beneficial and important.
    Best for large groups where formality is needed
    and questions are not address during the
    presentation.
  • Hard to access learning level. Success depends
    on the presenters skill and knowledge. Can be
    over used.

31
Teaching Methods
  • Demonstrations
  • Can provide a hear, see and do experience.
    Participants get the necessary attention from the
    instructor. Learner can self pace the
    demonstration.
  • Require more time. May require a lot of
    equipment and material so that everyone has the
    chance to participate.

32
Teaching Methods
  • Activities
  • Provides a hear, see and do experience.
    Participants need to clearly understand the goal
    of the activity. Participants get the necessary
    attention from the instructor.
  • Reflection is required at the completion of the
    activity.

33
Teaching Methods
  • Inquiries
  • Provides a hear, see and do experience in which
    participant are required to analyze a situation
    and develop their own conclusions. The
    participants not only give their conclusion but
    the rationale for their decision.
  • Reflection is intrinsic to this method. Takes
    more time. A great way to teach ethics.

34
Teaching Methods
  • Teachable Moments
  • Unexpected opportunities to educate. Spontaneity
    adds to the significance of the opportunity.
    Personalizes the message. Often so numerous the
    instructor needs to pick and chose the better
    opportunities. Another great method for teaching
    ethics.

35
Teaching Methods
  • Storytelling, Role Playing, Skits
  • Fun and engaging. Interactive method for
    actively engaging the learner. Great for
    building energy.

36
Teaching Methods
  • Learning Stations
  • A number of skills can be taught simultaneously.
    Learner are broken into more manageable groups.
    See, hear and do opportunities are provided.
    Stations can be self guided.
  • Requires more materials and equipment.

37
Teaching Methods
  • Debates
  • A structured way to provide learners with the
    opportunity to discuss controversial issues.
    Educator can serve as a facilitator or a
    resource. Good way to expose student to opposing
    view points.
  • Participant need to be well versed in the
    subject. Preparation time may be needed. Can
    become negative.

38
Teaching Methods
  • Discussion
  • A group approach to exploring issues or ideas.
    Many formats from free format to structured. A
    summary of key point at the conclusion of the
    discussion is important.
  • Participant need to be well versed in the
    subject. Preparation time may be needed.

39
Teaching Methods
  • Other Strategies.
  • Team teaching.
  • Peer teaching.
  • Guest speakers.

40
The Lesson Plan
  • Establish your Goals.
  • The skill goals.
  • The ethical goals.
  • (Values, Mission and Vision)

41
The Lesson Plan
  • Research and Gather Information
  • Select the most important aspects.
  • Having an abundance of information is preferable.
  • Instructors usually know more than they present.

42
The Lesson Plan
  • Greater knowledge gives greater ease at
    presenting the material.
  • Consulting peers and other subject matter experts
    can help an educator gage their level of
    expertise.

43
The Lesson Plan
  • Organize the Material.
  • Outline the material.
  • Look for recurrent themes and natural
    transitions.
  • Speaking from an outline is more natural than
    reading from text.
  • Continuously improve over time. Use what works
    for you.

44
The Lesson Plan
  • Prepare YOUR lesson plan.
  • A structured and detailed tool for preparing a
    class.
  • A reminder of the most important components.
  • A guide to follow during the presentation.

45
The Lesson Plan
  • Prepare YOUR lesson plan.
  • Materials needed.
  • Goal anticipated outcome.
  • Objectives specific expectations of the
    students after the class. Measureable.

46
The Lesson Plan
  • Prepare YOUR lesson plan.
  • Motivation introduction and an explanation of
    why you are instructing them and why they are
    there for instruction. Include the motivation
    behind the material.
  • Presentation the body of the lesson.

47
The Lesson Plan
  • Prepare YOUR lesson plan.
  • Conclusion summary of key points.
  • Evaluation the means of determining if the
    students have met the objective.

48
Critique Guidelines
  • Feedback is a gift.
  • Information from people with different
    backgrounds can be useful.
  • Sandwiching negative comments between positives
    can make the critique more valuable.

49
Critique Guidelines
  • Improvement is the goal of the critique. Be
    tactfully honest.
  • Feedback is a gift.

50
Teaching Tips
  • Rehearse. Practice makes perfect. Practice
    timing.
  • Remember that 85-93 of communication is tonal
    or non-verbal.
  • Interact with your audience.
  • Ask questions to stimulate involvement and
    learning.

51
Evaluation
  • Importance of attitude and behavior of a teacher.
  • Learning styles. Importance of knowing and
    understanding your audience.
  • Teaching methods that meet the needs of different
    learning styles.

52
Evaluation
  • Demonstrate the ability to prepare a lesson plan.
  • Present at least one short (5 min) and one long
    (20 min) lesson.
  • Critique other participant on their presentations.

53
Principles of Education
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