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The new SAS Core Curriculum Optional Presentation Title * * The Ad Hoc Core Curriculum Committee Membership, 2007-8 Chair: Randy Gallistel, Psychology SAS Faculty ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: The


1
  • The
  • new
  • SAS
  • Core
  • Curriculum

2
The Ad Hoc Core Curriculum Committee Membership,
2007-8
  • Chair Randy Gallistel, Psychology
  • SAS Faculty Members
  • Dennis Bathory, Political Science
  • Harriet Davidson, English and WGS
  • Monica Driscoll, MBB
  • Frances Egan, Philosophy
  • Jane Grimshaw, Linguistics
  • Dorothy Hodgson, Anthropology
  • Jane Junn, Poli. Science
  • Mohan Kalelkar, Physics and Astronomy
  • Elizabeth Leake, Italian
  • James Masschaele, History
  • Terry McGuire, Genetics
  • Lorraine Piroux, French
  • Thomas Prusa, Economics
  • Ben Sifuentes-Jáuregui, American Studies
  • Kathryn Uhrich, Chemistry
  • Andrew Vershon, MBB
  • Appointed Members from other Units
  • Warren Crown, Learning Teaching, GSE
  • Martin Markowitz, Associate Dean of NB
    Undergraduate Program, RBS
  • Patricia Mayer, Dance, MGSA
  • Brent Ruben, Communication, SCILS
  • Paula Voos, Labor Studies, SMLR
  •  
  • Ex-Officio Members (non-voting)
  • Peter Klein, Acting Executive Vice Dean
  • Michael Beals, Vice Dean for Undergraduate
    Education
  • Susan E. Lawrence, Associate Dean for
    Undergraduate Education
  • Vic Tulli, Associate Dean of SAS (staffing)
  •  
  • Student Members (non-voting)
  • Chad Kim SAS-LC 09
  • Brenna Krieger SAS-DC 09
  • Aaron McKay SAS-UC 10 (until Feb. 2008)

3
Approved by the faculty May 5, 2008
4
Implementation certification of courses
  • Core Requirements Committee Membership, 2008-11
  • Chair Larry Scanlon
  • Ousseina Alidou
  • Tamar Brill
  • Barbara Cooper
  • Martha Haviland
  • Mary Hawkesworth
  • Douglas Johnson
  • Mohan Kalelkar
  • John Kolassa
  • Susan Lawrence
  • Elizabeth Leake
  • Jennifer Mandelbaum
  • Stewart Mohr
  • Lenore Neigeborn
  • Jeff Rubin
  • Louisa Schein
  • Kathleen Scott
  • John Taylor
  • Julie Traxler
  • Gail Triner
  • Paula Voss

5
Points of Agreement
  • Distribution Requirements

6
Points of Agreement
7
Assessment
Hanging over us was
  • This meant that
  • What ever way we defined critical thinking ---
    or any other general education goal --- we were
    going to have to have and assess student learning
    outcome goals.
  • Student learning goals
  • Method of assessment

8
Resources on Assessment for SAS faculty
9
ONE SOLUTION
A goal-based Core Curriculum with authentic,
minimally invasive, efficient, and valid
formative assessment tools suited to our specific
learning goals.
This is an innovative, but unfamiliar, approach
to General Education. While this poses some
implementation challenges, it also makes SAS well
poised to be a national leader in 21st C
curricular design.
10
  • The SAS Core is based on
    overlapping
    and mutually
    reinforcing learning goals

    that form the core of
    a
    modern liberal
    arts and
    sciences education at a

    leading 21st C research

    university.
  • The learning goals clearly

    articulate what SAS students

    are able to do upon completion of
    the
    Core, incorporating the reasons for these
    requirements right into the
    requirements themselves.

11
21ST CENTURY CHALLENGES
  • ( 6 credits) Students will meet two goals. 21C
  • Students will be able to
  • Analyze the degree to which forms of human
    difference shape a persons experiences of and
    perspectives on the world.
  • Analyze a contemporary global issue from a
    multidisciplinary perspective.
  • Analyze the relationship that science and
    technology have to a contemporary social issue.
  • Analyze issues of social justice across local and
    global contexts.

12
AREAS OF INQUIRYNatural Sciences
All courses meet the first goal and at least one
more
(6 credits) All courses meet the first goal and
at least one
other. Students must meet two goals.
NS Students will be able to Understand and
apply basic principles and concepts in the
physical or biological sciences. Explain and
be able to assess the relationship among
assumptions, method, evidence, arguments, and
theory in scientific analysis. Identify and
critically assess ethical and societal issues in
science.
13
AREAS OF INQUIRYSocial SCL and Historical
HST Analysis All SCL and HST courses meet at
least one of the first three goals.Students will
be able to Understand the bases and
development of human and societal

endeavors across time and place. Explain and be
able to assess the relationship among
assumptions,
method, evidence, arguments, and
theory in social and historical analysis.
Identify and critically assess ethical issues in
social science and history.
All Historical Analysis courses also meet one of
the three shared goals
Historical Analysis (3 credits) Students must
meet one goal. HST Students will be able to
Explain the development of some aspect of a
society or culture over time, including the
history of ideas or history of science. Employ
historical reasoning to study human endeavors.
14
AREAS OF INQUIRYSocial SCL and Historical
HST Analysis All SCL and HST courses meet at
least one of the first three goals.Students will
be able to Understand the bases and
development of human and societal

endeavors across time and place. Explain and be
able to assess the relationship among
assumptions,
method, evidence, arguments, and
theory in social and historical analysis.
Identify and critically assess ethical issues in
social science and history.
All Social Analysis courses also meet one of the
three shared goals
Social Analysis (3 credits) Students must meet
one goal. SCL Students will be able to
Understand different theories about human
culture, social identity, economic entities,
political systems, other forms of social
organization. Apply concepts about human and
social behavior to particular questions or
situations.
15
AREAS OF INQUIRYArts and Humanities
Courses will be identified by specific goal
(6 credits) Students must meet two goals.
AH Students will be able to Examine
critically philosophical and other theoretical

issues concerning the nature of reality, human
experience,
knowledge, value, and/or cultural production.
Analyze arts and/or literatures in themselves and
in relation to specific histories, values,
languages, cultures, and technologies.
Understand the nature of human languages and
their speakers. Engage critically in the
process of creative expression.
16
COGNITIVE SKILLS AND PROCESSESWriting and
Communication WC
Courses are certified for multiple goals
students will meet all 5 goals in 3 courses
  • ( 9 credits 355101 one WCr and one WCd.)
  • Students will meet all goals. Students will be
    able to
  • Communicate complex ideas effectively, in
    standard written English, to a general audience.
  • Respond effectively to editorial feedback from
    peers, instructors, and/or supervisors through
    successive drafts and revision. WCr
  • Communicate effectively in modes appropriate to
    a discipline or area of inquiry. WCd
  • Evaluate and critically assess sources and use
    the conventions of attribution and citation
    correctly.
  • Analyze and synthesize information and ideas
    from multiple sources to generate new insights.

17
COGNITIVE SKILLS AND PROCESSESQuantitative and
Formal Reasoning
  • (6 credits or 3 plus placement out of 3)
  • Students must meet two goals. QFR
  • Students will be able to
  • Formulate, evaluate, and communicate
    conclusions and inferences from quantitative
    information. QFRq
  • Apply effective and efficient mathematical or
    other formal processes to reason and to solve
    problems. QFRr
  • (students may meet QFRr through placing in a
    higher level 640 course whose prerequisite
    meets the goal)

18
A Word About the Quantitative and Formal
Reasoning Requirements
  • All students still must take the math
    placement test.
  • All students who place into 640025 will
    automatically be registered for it during their
    first semester.
  • When advising potential majors, be sure to note
    any math prerequisites they will need in order to
    complete the majors.

19
COGNITIVE SKILLS AND PROCESSESInformation
Technology and Research
  • (3 credits) Students must meet one goal. ITR
  • Students will be able to
  • Employ current technologies to access
    information, to conduct research, and to
    communicate findings.
  • Analyze and critically assess information from
    traditional and emergent technologies.
  • Understand the principles that underlie
    information systems.

Nearly every course in this category is also
certified as meeting other Core goals. We also
need faculty to submit more courses in this
category
20
  • A SINGLE COURSE MAY BE USED
    TO MEET MULTIPLE GOALS.
  • ALL COURSES MUST BE CREDIT-BEARING, GRADED
    COURSES CERTIFIED BY THE SAS FACULTY AS MEETING
    CORE GOALS.
  • (e.g., E credit courses cannot be used to meet
    goals, nor can pass/no credit courses).
  • Generally it will take 1014 courses to complete
    the Core, some of which may also fulfill major or
    minor requirements.

21
All of the Core goals include a specific type of
kind of critical thinking activity that students
will be able TO DO when they complete a Core
course Students are not simply taking courses
in particular subjects. The goals provide
students with the REASON they have to take these
courses and it gives them prepackaged language
for resumes, etc.
What is critical thinking?verb to think
critically
  • Analyze
  • Apply
  • Assess
  • Communicate
  • Employ
  • Engage
  • Evaluate
  • Examine
  • Explain
  • Formulate
  • Identify
  • Understand

22
Side bar on page 4
How Do We Know the Core Works? Our Commitment to
a Culture of Evidence. In the School of Arts and
Sciences, we dont just require students to take
courses and assume they achieve these goals. Only
a special, limited group of courses is certified
as meeting Core Curriculum goals. These courses
put specific Core Curriculum goals front and
center in their course design and regularly
assess student achievement of these Core goals
using state-of-the-art authentic assessment
measures. Our faculty members are constantly
improving their Core courses to better meet these
goals. Only courses that have committed to
this process are certified as Core courses. This
is why some particular courses are certified
while other courses that may seem to have similar
or analogous foci are not. This is your assurance
that SAS students develop the capabilities the
Core promises. Learn more at sasoue.rutgers.edu.
23
How we assess
There are several typical methods of
assessment. Most of our Core courses are using
some of the 28 rubrics we have created to go with
each learning goal. The rubric is used to
score a set of assignments or exam questions that
ask the student to actually DO the goal. . You
can read these rubrics and learn more about what
each of these 28 goals means in the Faculty
Guide to Submitting Courses for Certification in
the Core Curriculum on the SAS OUE web page.
24
Certification of Courses for the Core Curriculum
  • The new Core focuses on the students achievement
  • goals and attainment of capabilities at a
    foundational level.
  • By design, the SAS Core goals track nearly any
    reasonable articulation
  • of the fundamental goals of a liberal arts and
    sciences curriculum.
  • Thus, virtually all the courses we offer will, in
    some measure,
  • advance student achievement of some of these Core
    goals.
  • But, of course, we dont want to certify every
    course we offer as
  • meeting Core goals there was very clear faculty
    agreement that the Core
  • will be more meaningful to students if there are
    shorter, more focused, lists of courses than we
    have been accustom to under distribution
    requirements.

25
CRCs Guidelines
  • Courses certified for the Core must have the
    relevant learning goals front and center in their
    design. The Core goals should be highlighted on
    the first page of the syllabus, maximizing
    transparency for students and for the CRC.
  • Generally, courses certified for the Core should
    be accessible to a wide range of students and
    equip students to function as life long learners,
    global citizens, and productive members of
    society irrespective of their ultimate majors and
    minors.
  • The intent of the new Core is to stimulate the
    development of new courses particularly designed
    to meet the Core goals. Multidisciplinary
    courses are particularly encouraged.
  • Existing courses should be modified, putting the
    Core goals front and center in the course design
    (and on the first page of the syllabus) before
    submission for certification.

26
CRCs Guidelines
  • Aggregate student achievement of the Core goal(s)
    should be demonstrable through appropriate
    assessment tools.
  • The issue is not whether the course does the
    activity listed in the learning goal, but rather,
    are the students able to do the activity listed
    upon completion of the course. Courses certified
    for the Core must include an assessment plan.
    Further details on assessment are provided to the
    faculty in the Faculty Guide, but basically,
    were just asking for a bit of data that shows
    that our students, as a group, are learning what
    we think we are teaching.

27
CRCs Guidelines
  • Generally, certified courses will be 100 or 200
    level courses. Courses will not be certified for
    the Core when students will necessarily have
    already met the proposed Core learning goals by
    taking the prerequisite courses.
  • If this results in a ludicrous situation for a
    particular student, write to the CRC care of
    slawrence_at_sas.rutgers.edu
  • But, this does not mean this we will grant
    waivers for students who just want to
    take a specialized upper-level course rather than
    a certified Core Curriculum course.

28
CRCs Guidelines
  • Courses will only be certified when they address
    the learning goal(s) every time they are offered
    irrespective of instructor, section, semester, or
    particular topic of focus.
  • In order to be certified, Topics courses will
    need to have an embedded assessment tool geared
    to the Core goal(s) that will be employed in all
    sections of the course each time it is offered.
  • For each course number certified for the Core,
    a generic Course synopsis (or full syllabi) that
    includes the Core Curriculum learning goals that
    the course has been certified for should be
    available online through the department web page
    and the online schedule of classes at all times,
    updated as necessary.  

29
CRCs Guidelines
  • The certification process --- and the requirement
    that courses perform and report assessments of
    student achievement of the Core learning goals --
    is central to the Core Curriculum.
  • Consequently, students will not be able to appeal
    to have a particular course added to the list of
    courses certified as meeting a Core Curriculum
    goal.
  • It is VERY important that faculty not tell
    students that courses meet Core goals when in
    fact they have not been vetted by the CRC and
    certified by faculty vote.

30
Many courses certified as AH might also be used
to meet the political science majors cognate
fields requirement. Also, some foreign language
courses at the intermediate level and above are
AH certified
Hypothetical Guide to the Core for Political
Science Majors
Some Suggestions Energy Climate
Change Immigrant States Eating Right Lessons from
Europe Global East Asia Sea Change War Critical
Perspectives Plantation to White Hs Study Abroad

In addition to Expos 101, the writing program
offers a number of options appropriate for
political science majors. Political Science
courses certified as WCd include 790 Also
consider taking a WC courses in one of your
cognate fields.
Some Suggestions Energy Climate
Change Sea Change Biology, Society, Biomedical
Issues
Many courses certified as HST might also be used
to meet the political science majors cognate
fields requirement
Political Science majors are strongly urged to
take 640111-112 or 115 precalc and 790300 Poli
Sci methods
You will meet the Social Analysis goals in the
process of completing your Political Science
major.
Some Suggestions Great Insights in Computer
Science Statistics I The Structure of
Information Computer Analysis of Social Sci
Data
31
Talking about the Core
  • Getting the message across -- A few suggestions
    on nomenclature
  • Core Curriculum / Core --- Core is always
    capitalized.
  • Areas of Inquiry -- these are not disciplinary
    distribution requirements.
  • Certified -- courses are certified for the Core
    (rather than approved).
  • Front and Center Core goals must be front and
    center in the course design not merely touched
    on.
  • AND, remember, courses are only
    certified for the Core when the
  • faculty commits to the process of
    assessment and improvement .
  • Met Core goals students have met a Core goal,
    rather than that they have met a requirement.
  • Complete that students have completed the Core,
    rather than that they have fulfilled all
    requirements.

32
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