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WHAT DO YOU SEE? Let

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... Dede Eri Supria Urban Class ,1977 Oil on Canvas, 200x100cm Cindy Sherman Untitled Film Stills Bayu Utomo Radjikin Lang Kacang , ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: WHAT DO YOU SEE? Let


1
WHAT DO YOU SEE? Lets ANALYZE Some PAINTINGS
2
  • Composition VIII, 1923, Wassily Kandinsky
  • Oil on canvas, 140 x 201 cm (55 1/8 x 79 1/8 in)

3
  • Woman I
  • Willem De Kooning
  • Oil on Canvas

4
  • Pablo Picassos
  • Les Demoiselles d Avignon

5
  • Still Life with a Ginger Jar and Eggplants,
    1890-94, Paul Cezanne oil on canvas, 28 1/2 x 36
    inches (72 x 91 cm)

6
Dede Eri Supria Urban Class,1977 Oil on Canvas,
200x100cm
7
Cindy Sherman Untitled Film Stills
8
Bayu Utomo Radjikin Lang Kacang, 1991 Mixed
media 141 x 104 x 120 cm
9
The 7ELEMENTS OF DESIGN
The 7 Principles of Design
FELDMANs Approach to Reading a Painting
10
The 7ELEMENTS OF DESIGN
1. Line
5. Value
  • 2. Shape

3. Form
6. Texture
7. Space
4. Colour
Complex Correlation
11
1. LINE
  • A mark with length and direction. It refers to
    the continuous mark made on some surface by a
    moving point.
  1. Tools used to create lines (materials/ approach)
  2. Types of lines and what they say

12
LINE
  • Lines can be created using various tools. Lines
    can be created by drawing, painting, printing,
    incising etc.
  • Possible Materials/Tools
  • Pencil (2B, 4B, 6B, H, etc)
  • Colour Pencil ( Water)
  • 3. Pen ( Ink Water)
  • 4. Chalk/ Oil Pastels
  • 5. Paints (Watercolours/ Poster Colours, Acrylic,
    Oil, etc)
  • 6. Brushes (Flat, Round, Big, Small, etc)
  • 7. Others (Sticks, Lipsticks, Paper, Rust etc)

13
LINE
  • Lines can be seen in some artworks as patterns or
    outline of objects.
  • There are various different types of line
    Vertical, horizontal, diagonal, straight/ ruled,
    curved, bent, angular, thin, thick/ wide,
    interrupted (dotted, dashed, broken, etc.),
    blurred/fuzzy, controlled, freehand, parallel,
    hatching, meandering, spiraling etc.
  • Lines often define a space and may create an
    outline/ contour, define a silhouette create
    patterns/ shape/ movement and the illusion of
    mass/ volume.

?
14
LINE
Lines can be expressive!
  • It can convey messages. Certain kinds of lines
    create feelings of nervousness, weakness,
    strength, dominance/ power.

Type of Line
Vertical Lines
Curvy Lines
Zigzag Lines/ Diagonal Lines
Thick Lines
Thin Lines
Description
Create sense of balance in layout
Create an appearance of rhythm, harmony and grace.
Create a sense of energy and drama
Create a feeling of strength, aggression, anger
Appears delicate and fragile
(complexity)
Vertical, Horizontal, Thick, Bold Solid lines painting in red, blue and yellow
Curvy, Fluid, Thin lines splattered across the entire canvas
Complex Description
Creates an appearance of strength, stability and balance in layout. Primary colours suggest purity and back to basics?
Suggests movement, rhythm and fragility. Create a sense of confusion?
15
  • Materials/ Approach
  • Use of bold thick brushes
  • Oil paint
  • Rub, scrap off re-paint
  • Paint left to drip
  • Line quality
  • Aggressive brushwork used to outline the shape of
    the figure.
  • Organic black lines which appears thick or thin
    based on the pressure and the attack on the
    canvas.
  • Lines created from scraping of paint/ thin layers
    of paint.

LINE
  • Woman I
  • Willem De Kooning, Oil on Canvas

16
LINE
  • Materials/ Approach
  • Dripping of Paint to create an Action Painting
  • Enamel paint
  • Use of a stick/ fine brush
  • Canvas on floor.
  • Line quality
  • Fluid and layers of paint dripped in a rhythmic
    formation of lines.
  • Organic curvy lines which appears thick or thin
    depending of the speed and energy exert by
    Pollock.
  • Overlapping of black, white and grey lines.

Cathedral, Jackson Pollock, 1947
17
LINE
Dede Eri Supria, Urban Class,1977 Oil on
Canvas, 200x100cm
  • Materials/ Approach
  • Meticulous capturing of the illusion of depth,
    space and form.
  • Carefully composed image with no visible
    intention of presenting lines as lines. Rather,
    the lines (if any evident) are used to define a
    space, an outline, a implied form or for textural
    qualities.
  • Line quality
  • No visible lines intended. Illusion of mass/
    volume created with colours, tones and use of
    lines.
  • Objects that are linear in nature (Eg. The
    vertical stilts) create a sense of balance and
    perspective in the painting.

18
2. SHAPE
  • it is an enclosed space defined and determined by
    other art elements such as line, colour, value
    and texture.
  1. Geometric and Organic Shapes
  2. Shapes as symbols
  3. Shapes that evokes feelings

19
SHAPE
  • Geometric and Organic Shapes
  • Examples of geometric/ inorganic shapes include
  • circle and oval polygon such as triangle,
    square, rectangle, rhombus, trapezium, trapezoid,
    pentagon etc.
  • Examples of organic shapes include
  • Anything that do not have a regular fixed shape.
    Anything from nature.

Organic shapes are often described as amorphous
and biomorphous.
20
SHAPE
?
  • Shapes as Symbols
  • Simple shapes may be given contextual meanings
    and hence become recognizable symbols

?
?
21
SHAPE
  • Shapes can evoke feelings by changing their
    colours.

22
  • Wassily Kandinsky,
  • Composition VIII, 1923,
  • Oil on canvas, 140 x 201 cm

SHAPE
  • Materials/ Approach
  • Detailed and mathematical approach to painting.
  • Appear to have used mathematical tools like
    rulers, compasses etc
  • Shape quality
  • Geometric shapes of varying sizes. (eg. Circles,
    triangles, grids etc)
  • Gradual and mild colours used for individual
    shapes to create a sense of unity/ balance in the
    painting.
  • Patterns, Rhythm and sense of depth created with
    repeated use of certain shapes.

23
  • Materials/ Approach
  • Oil Paint on Canvas
  • Carefully conceived composition and layout which
    shows multiple angles and viewpoint of objects.
  • Shape quality
  • Angular shapes combined to form the figure, an
    organic form.
  • Nature of cubism.
  • Shapes that are suggestive of fruits.
  • Colours added in shapes to create illusion of form

SHAPE
  • Pablo Picasso
  • Les Demoiselles d Avignon
  • Oil on Canvas

24
3. FORM
  • Form also refers to an element of art that is
    three-dimensional (height, width and depth) and
    encloses volume. It is the total physical
    characteristics of an object.
  • For example, a triangle, which is
    two-dimensional, is a shape, but a pyramid, which
    is three-dimensional, is a form.
  • Cubes, spheres, ovoids, pyramids, cones and
    cylinders are examples of various forms.
  • Organic Vs Geometric Form

25
4. COLOUR
  • Colour is produced by light of various
    wavelengths, and when light strikes an object and
    reflects back to the eyes.
  • When the spectrum is organized as a color wheel,
    the colors are divided into groups called
    primary, secondary and intermediate (or tertiary)
    colors analogous and complementary, and also as
    warm and cool colors.

26
  • Colors can be objectively described as saturated,
    clear, cool, warm, deep, subdued, grayed, tawny,
    matt, glossy, monochrome, multicolored,
    particolored, or polychromed.
  • Some words used to describe colors are more
    subjective (subject to personal opinion or
    taste), such as exciting, sweet, saccharine,
    brash, garish, ugly, beautiful, cute,
    fashionable, pretty, and sublime.

COLOUR
27
The Colour Wheel
COLOUR
28
Warm Colours Vs Cool Colours
Warm Colours Expressive Qualities
Red, Red-Orange, Yellow Produces a sense of warmth, harmony or anger.
Cool Colours Expressive Qualities
Blue, Blue-Green, Violet Produces a sense of freshness, coolness or sadness.
29
SYMBOLISM and EMOTIONS
  • Color conveys meanings in two primary ways -
    natural associations and psychological symbolism.
  • It is not mind control. The truth of the matter
    is that people are comfortable when colors remind
    them of similar things. Eg. a soft shade of blue
    triggers associations with the sky and a
    psychological sense of calm. Successful design
    requires an awareness of how and why colors
    communicate meaning. The source of these meanings
    can be quite conspicuous, such as those found in
    nature red is the color of blazing fire and
    blood, blue the color of cooling waters and the
    sky. Other meanings may be more complex and not
    universal.

COLOUR
30
  • Natural Associations Occurrences of colors in
    nature are universal and timeless. For example,
    the fact that green is the color of vegetation
    can be considered a universal and timeless
    association.

COLOUR
31
Psychological/ Cultural Associations
COLOUR
  • Color may generate another level of meaning in
    the mind. This symbolism arises from cultural and
    contemporary contexts. As such, it is not
    universal and may be unrelated to its natural
    associations.
  • Eg, greens associations with nature communicate
    growth, fruitfulness, freshness and ecology. On
    the other hand, green may also be symbolic of
    good luck, seasickness, money and greed all of
    which have nothing to do with green plants. These
    associations arise from a complex assortment of
    sources.

32
Psychological/ Cultural Associations
COLOUR
  • Furthermore, color may have both positive and
    negative symbolism.
  • For example, although blue is the beautiful color
    of the sky on a sunny day, it can be symbolic of
    sadness or stability. Idiomatic American English
    reflects these traits in phrases such as singing
    the blues and blue chip stocks.
  • Red is another example of dual symbolism. On one
    hand, as the color of fire and blood, it is an
    energizing, aggressive and bold color. In direct
    contrast, red is used for STOP signs throughout
    the world today.

33
Although there are no absolutes, there are
logical sources for the range of complex and
sometimes contradictory psychological/cultural
meanings of colors. These may arise from any of
the following
COLOUR
  • 1. Cultural associations the color of currency,
    traditions, celebrations, geography, etc. (Eg,
    green is associated with heaven (Muslims) and
    luck (U.S. and Ireland) 2. Political and
    historical associations the color of flags,
    political parties, royalty, etc. (Eg, green is
    the color of Libya's flag its the favorite
    color of Emperor Hirohito and the source of
    "Green Day" in Japan, and in the U.S., the Green
    Party.)

34
  • 3. Religious and mythical associations the
    colors associated with spiritual or magical
    beliefs (Eg, the green man was the God of
    fertility in Celtic myths, a symbolism that
    carries over into todays associations of Green
    MM candies with sexuality in the U.S. Also, in
    contemporary Western culture, green is associated
    with extraterrestrial beings.) 4. Linguistic
    associations color terminology within individual
    languages (Eg, South Pacific languages refer to
    shades of green by comparison to plants in
    various stages of growth. In Scottish Gaelic the
    word for blue ('gorm') is also the word used for
    the color of grass. 5. Contemporary usage and
    fads current color applications to objects,
    sports, and associations generated by modern
    conventions and trends. (Eg, green is used world
    wide for traffic lights signifying "go." In
    Scandinavia, green has been a popular color for
    many decades. In the U.S., avocado green was a
    popular color for appliances in the 1960s. Today,
    lime green has been a hip and trendy color in
    fashion and advertising in the US since the late
    1990s.)

COLOUR
  • http//www.colormatters.com/brain.html

35
The bride in this Renaissance masterpiece wears
green as a symbol of her fertility. She is
slouching in imitation of pregnancy, thus
indicating her willingness to bear children.
36
5. VALUE (TONE)
  • Value refers to the lightness or darkness of a
    colour. This is important in any polychromatic
    image, but it can be more apparent when an image
    is monochromatic, as in many drawings, woodcuts,
    lithographs and photographs. This is commonly the
    case in much sculptures and architecture too.
  • Changes in value, whether sudden or gradual, can
    add greatly to the visual impact of art forms.
    Changes in value can also be used to help the
    artist express an idea.

37
VALUE (TONE)
A value scale employing a smoothly nuanced
gradation of values.
A value scale or gray scale in eight stepped
grades of values.
And another stepped scale produced by hatching
and cross-hatching.
38
  •  Below another value scale or gray scale in
    which stepped grades of values are labeled for
    their percentages of black, and values used to
    give planar shapes greater solidity and depth.

VALUE (TONE)
39
  • A full range of values can also be produced by a
    variety of other means. These include hatching
    and stipple techniques, as well as with textures
    and patterns of other sorts.
  • The following illustration shows colors of
    various values. Value changes from pure hues are
    called shades and tints. On the right, pure hues
    are marked by dots. Notice how their values
    their positions beside the gray scale are
    varied.

VALUE (TONE)
40
6. TEXTURE
  • Texture is the surface quality or "feel" of an
    object, its smoothness, roughness, softness, etc.
  • Textures may be actual or simulated. Actual
    textures can be felt with the fingers, while
    simulated textures are suggested by an artist in
    the painting of different areas of a picture
    often in representing drapery, metals, rocks,
    hair, etc.

Samuel van Hoogstraten (Dutch, 1627-1678),
Trompe-l'oeil, 1664, oil on canvas, 45.5 x 57.5
cm,
Woman I, Willem De Kooning Oil on Canvas
41
Examples of textures
                 
             
Words describing textures include flat, smooth
(third row, right), shiny, glossy, glittery,
velvety, feathery, soft, wet, gooey, furry,
sandy, leathery (second row, right), crackled
(upper left), prickly, abrasive, rough (first
row, right), furry, bumpy, corrugated (second
row, left), puffy (second row, third), rusty
(third row, second), slimey (third row, third).
TEXTURE
42
7. SPACE
  • An element of art that refers to the distance or
    area between, around, above, below, or within
    things. It can be described as two-dimensional or
    three-dimensional as flat, shallow, or deep as
    open or closed as positive or negative and as
    actual, ambiguous, or illusory.

43
two-dimensional space Illusion of Depth flat,
shallow, or deep
Workers in a Canteen by Chua Mia Tee
SPACE
Les Demoiselles d Avignon by Pablo Picasso
Cathedral, Jackson Pollock, 1947
44
  • Space is implied when perspective is used. Other
    methods used to suggest space include overlapping
    objects, scaling and shading.

SPACE
  • perspective - The technique artists use to
    project an illusion of the three-dimensional
    world onto a two-dimensional surface. Perspective
    helps to create a sense of depth of receding
    space.
  • Fundamental techniques used to achieve
    perspective are controlling variation between
    sizes of depicted subjects, overlapping some of
    them, and placing those that are on the depicted
    ground as lower when nearer and higher when
    deeper. In addition, there are three major types
    of perspective aerial perspective, atmospheric
    perspective and linear perspective.

http//studiochalkboard.evansville.edu/draw.html
45
Three-dimensional space
SPACE
A Thousand Years by Damien Hirst
Temple of the Mind by Montien Boonma
In Bed by Ron Mueck
46
  • In these images, negative spaces have been shaped
    and placed among positive spaces so that a viewer
    can make closure on a triangle, a square, and a
    cube.

SPACE
47
The 7ELEMENTS OF DESIGN
When Analyzing Works Objectively..
The 7 PRINCIPLES OF DESIGN
FELDMANs Approach to Reading a Painting
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