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Science Essential Standards

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Science Essential Standards RC Day Workshop 1 of 3 October 31st, 2011 Other Resources (see .pdf file for the components of these activities) www.paperclippedagogy ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Science Essential Standards


1
Science Essential Standards
  • RC Day Workshop 1 of 3
  • October 31st, 2011

Happy Halloween
2
Session Essential Questions
  • What processes must all science teachers
    initiate/continue to transition into teaching the
    NC Science Essential Standards with efficacy?
  • How will we frame our instructional practices to
    meet the requirements for student-mastery based
    on the Next Generation of Science Standards and
    Assessments?

3
Focus North Carolina Professional Teaching
Standards
  • Standard I Teachers demonstrate leadership
  • Standard III Teachers know the content they
    teach
  • Standard IV Teachers facilitate learning for
    their students

4
These sessions are about Teachers
The BIG Picture
5
Vertical Curriculum
  • Hierarchy of Scientific Content Knowledge (See
    Handout 6.7)
  • The Essential Standards intentionally reflect the
    importance of topics and ensure that some topics
    covered under the strands of Life, Earth and
    Physical Science continue from kindergarten
    through high school
  • In reading the Unpacked document, be sure to
    note prerequisite knowledge often introduced with
    Students should already know
  • Focus on identifying learning targets and
    criterion for success (How will you know that
    know it?)

6
How do you prepare for teaching?
  • Locate Improving Adult Content Knowledge Before
    Teaching a Unit Handout 6.1
  • Put a v next to the strategy you most frequently
    use during the school year to improve or refresh
    your own adult content knowledge before teaching
    a new unit.
  • Discussion How does adult content knowledge
    influence instruction? Why must science teachers
    remain abreast current information concerning the
    content they teach?

7
Beliefs about Standards and Research on Learning
  • Locate Ten Common Beliefs about Standards
    Research on Learning, Handout 2.1
  • Complete the anticipation guide by reading each
    statement and marking whether you Agree,
    Disagree, or are Not Sure or It Depends
  • In small groups, discuss your responses to each
    statement.
  • We will revisit these statements throughout the
    day.

8
Science Curriculum Metaphors The Three Little
Pigs (continue)
  • The Three Little Pigs Story metaphorically
    describes various approaches to and
    considerations for K-12 science curriculum
    development. In a small group, read the story.
  • On the Post It note provided, please down the
    number of the 3 little pigs house you believe
    most represents your districts current
    curriculum design process (this includes work
    that was done previously if you have not started
    developing or revising your curriculum yet). For
    example, if you believe your district design
    process is most like the second little pigs
    house, record a 2. (Note You can have 1.5 and
    2.5 if you feel you are in-between.)
  • Place your sticky note on the chart to create a
    bar graph.

9
Science Curriculum Metaphors The Three Little
Pigs
  • Identify and discuss the metaphors used in
    describing the construction of each pigs house
    as they apply to curriculum development (Handout
    6.13). As you discuss these metaphors, talk about
    where you see your district in the story. Do any
    of these metaphors apply to your curriculum?
  • Translate one metaphor from each pigs house into
    a curriculum design practice as listed on your
    supplemental handout. Generate a list of things
    you think should be considered as we examine the
    Essential Standards and develop our local science
    curriculum.

10
Questioning in Science To Hypothesize or Not to
Hypothesize
  • There must be a balance between teacher-directed
    instruction and student independent exploration
    of concepts
  • Does this mean that teachers cannot guide
    students?
  • Read the article, To Hypothesize or Not to
    Hypothesize
  • Group Discussion How important is the adults
    understanding of an activity and ability to
    question in the execution of a hands-on activity?

11
Pre-Activity Instructions
  • For the following Activity you will engage as a
    student learner.
  • You may only speak and respond as a student.
    Please use your post-it notes to jot down teacher
    thoughts.

12
Activity 1 Hands-on (Moth)
Background information for teachers
http//www.millerandlevine.com/km/evol/Moths/moths
.html
13
Teacher Talk
  • Do you see the correlation of the activity to the
    Essential Standards? Which Essential Standard
    does the activity address?
  • Which of the 5Es does this lesson facilitate?
  • What questions do you have concerning the
    activity?
  • Do you facilitate similar activities in your
    classroom already?

14
Essential Standards Vocabulary
15
Fourth Grade Life Science
4.L.1 - Animals
16
Essential Standards Crosswalks
2009 Essential Standards 2004 NC SCOS
4.L.1 Understand the effects of environmental changes, adaptations and behaviors that enable animals (including humans) to survive in changing habitats. 1.01 Observe and describe how all living and nonliving things affect the life of a particular animal including other animals, plants, weather, climate
4.L.1.1 Give examples of changes in an organisms environment that are beneficial to it and some that are harmful. 1.03 Observe and discuss how behaviors and body structures help animals survive in a particular habitat.
4.L.1.2 Explain how animals meet their needs by using behaviors in response to information received from the environment. 1.04 Explain and discuss how humans and other animals can adapt their behavior to live in changing habitats.
17
Essential Standards Unpacked
  • 4.L.1.1
  • Students know that for any particular
    environment, some kinds of plants and animals
    survive well, some survive less well and some do
    not survive at all. When the insect population
    grows in an area that is frequented by insect
    eating birds, this is advantageous for the birds.
    Conversely, if the insect populations are
    decreased by disease in a similar scenario, the
    population of birds would be stressed and likely,
    reduced.
  • 4.L.1.2
  • Students know that animals collect information
    about the environment using their senses. Animals
    also exhibit instinctive (inborn) behaviors that
    help them to survive. Students know that in
    animals, the brain processes information, and
    signals the performance of behaviors that help
    the organism survive.

18
Essential Standards Crosswalks
2009 Essential Standards 2004 NC SCOS
4.L.1 Understand the effects of environmental changes, adaptations and behaviors that enable animals (including humans) to survive in changing habitats. 1.01 Observe and describe how all living and nonliving things affect the life of a particular animal including other animals, plants, weather, climate
4.L.1.3 Explain how humans can adapt their behavior to live in changing habitats (e.g., recycling wastes, establishing rain gardens, planting native species to prevent flooding and erosion). 1.04 Explain and discuss how humans and other animals can adapt their behavior to live in changing habitats.
4.L.1.4 Explain how differences among animals of the same population sometimes give individuals an advantage in surviving and reproducing in changing habitats. 1.02 Observe and record how animals of the same kind differ in some of their characteristics and discuss possible advantages and disadvantages of this variation.
19
Essential Standards Unpacked
  • 4.L.1.3
  • Students know that humans can adapt their
    behavior in order to conserve the materials and
    preserve the ecological systems that they depend
    on for survival.
  • 4.L.1.4
  • Students know that there is variation among
    individuals of one kind within a population.
    Students know that sometimes this variation
    results in individuals having an advantage in
    surviving and reproducing. Survival advantage is
    not something that is acquired by an organism
    through choice rather it is the result of
    characteristics that the organism already
    possesses.

20
Prioritize your instruction!
  • Based on the Essential Standards evaluate the
    content of your lesson plans using the criterion
    (Handout 6.14)
  • Essential Understandings
  • Important Understandings
  • Worth Being Familiar With But Not Necessary
  • Not Worth
  • How will this evaluative practice improve your
    planning as a science teacher?

21
Pre-Activity Instructions
  • For the following Activity you will engage as a
    student learner.
  • You may only speak and respond as a student.
    Please use your post-it notes to jot down teacher
    thoughts.

22
Activity 2 Hands-on (Animal Adaptation Bird
Beaks)

23
Teacher Talk
  • Do you see the correlation of the activity to the
    Essential Standards? Which Essential Standard
    does the activity address?
  • Which of the 5Es does this lesson facilitate?
  • What questions do you have concerning the
    activity?
  • Do you facilitate similar activities in your
    classroom already?

24
Other Resources (see .pdf file for the
components of these activities)
  • www.paperclippedagogy.wikispaces.com (by Dr.
    Carrie Nielsen and Dr. Anne Coleman from Cabrini
    College )
  • Project WILD activities How Many Bears?
    (limiting factors on black bear populations) Oh
    Deer! (deer needs of food, water, and
    shelter) Musk Ox Maneuvers (defensive maneuvers
    to protect young)
  • Citizen Science http//schoolofants.org/index.ht
    ml ant research based at NCSU

25
Essential Standards Vocabulary
26
Fourth Grade Life Science
4.L.2 - Food
27
CTS Curriculum Topic Study
  • National Science Education Standards
  • Children link eating with growth, health,
    strength, and energy, but they do not understand
    these ideas in detail. They understand
    connections between diet and health and that some
    foods are nutritionally better than others, but
    they do not necessarily know the reasons for
    these conclusions.

28
CTS Curriculum Topic Study
  • Science For All Americans
  • To stay in good operating condition, the human
    body requires a variety of foods and experiences.
    The amount of food energy (calories) a person
    requires varies with body size, age, sex,
    activity level, and metabolic rate. Beyond just
    energy, normal body operation requires substances
    to add to or replace the materials of which it is
    made unsaturated fats, trace amounts of a dozen
    elements whose atoms play key roles, and some
    traces of substances that human cells cannot
    synthesizeincluding some amino acids and
    vitamins. The normal condition of most body
    systems requires that they perform their adaptive
    function For example, muscles must effect
    movement, bones must bear loads, and the heart
    must pump blood efficiently. Regular exercise,
    therefore, is important for maintaining a healthy
    heart/ lung system, for maintaining muscle tone,
    and for keeping bones from becoming brittle.

29
CTS Curriculum Topic Study
  • Benchmarks for Science Literacy
  • Knowledge of science can inform choices about
    nutrition and exercise, but that doesn't ensure
    healthy practices. Some adults have ideas about
    health that are contrary to scientific facts.
    Ideas about what constitutes good nutrition
    change somewhat as new information accumulates,
    but the basics are quite stable. Students should
    learn these basics.

30
Essential Standards Crosswalks
2009 Essential Standards 2004 NC SCOS
4.L.2 Understand food and the benefits of vitamins, minerals and exercise. 4.01 Explain why organisms require energy to live and grow.
4.L.2.1 Classify substances as food or non-food items based on their ability to provide energy and materials for survival, growth and repair of the body. 4.02 Show how calories can be used to compare the chemical energy of different foods. 4.03 Discuss how foods provide both energy and nutrients for living organisms.
4.L.2.2 Explain the role of vitamins, minerals and exercise in maintaining a healthy body. 4.04 Identify starches and sugars as carbohydrates.
31
Essential Standards Unpacked
  • 4.L.2.1
  • Students know that living things derive their
    energy from food. Plants produce their own food,
    while other organisms must consume plants or
    other organisms in order to meet their food
    (energy) needs.
  • 4.L.2.2
  • Students know that humans have needs for
    vitamins, minerals, and exercise in order to
    remain healthy. Students know that vitamins and
    minerals are found in healthy foods, as well as
    dietary supplements. Students also know that
    movement is essential to the growth, development
    and maintenance of the human body and its
    systems.

32
Prioritize your instruction!
  • Based on the Essential Standards evaluate the
    content of your lesson plans using the criterion
    (Handout 6.14)
  • Essential Understandings
  • Important Understandings
  • Worth Being Familiar With But Not Necessary
  • Not Worth
  • How will this evaluative practice improve your
    planning as a science teacher?

33
Pre-Activity Instructions
  • For the following Activity you will engage as a
    student learner.
  • You may only speak and respond as a student.
    Please use your post-it notes to jot down teacher
    thoughts.

34
Activity 1 Formative Assessment Probe (4.L.2)
What kinds of things are considered food? Check
off the things on the list that are
scientifically called food. __lettuce
__sugar __salt __cookies __bread
__butter __milk __vitamins __water __french
fries __candy bar __turkey __minerals
__pancake syrup __banana __ketchup __diet
soda __flour Explain your thinking. What
definition or rule did you use to decide if
something can scientifically be called food?
35
Teacher Talk
  • Do you see the correlation of the activity to the
    Essential Standards? Which Essential Standard
    does the activity address?
  • Which of the 5Es does this lesson facilitate?
  • What questions do you have concerning the
    activity?
  • Do you facilitate similar activities in your
    classroom already?

36
Activity 2 Ariana and Antarctica Expedition
  • Ariannas Nutrition Expedition Five Food Group
    Based Nutrition Education Program (free resource
    National Dairy Council)
  • URL http//school.fueluptoplay60.com/tools/nut
    rition-education/lessons.php?tab1

37
Teacher Talk
  • Do you see the correlation of the activity to the
    Essential Standards? Which Essential Standard
    does the activity address?
  • Which of the 5Es does this lesson facilitate?
  • What questions do you have concerning the
    activity?
  • Do you facilitate similar activities in your
    classroom already?

38
Activity 3 Hands-on Be Label Able
  • Whats For Breakfast?
  • (from Project Food, Land People)
  • How do you decide what to eat for breakfast?
  • How often do you eat cereal? Why?
  • How do you decide what cereal to eat?
  • What do you think is the best cereal? Why?
  • What do you add to your cereal? Why?
  • What do you think is the best cereal
    advertisement on TV? Why? The worst? Why?

39
Activity 3 Hands-on Be Label Able
  • Comparing Cereals (refer to the ActivBoard for
    the questions)

40
Teacher Talk
  • Do you see the correlation of the activity to the
    Essential Standards? Which Essential Standard
    does the activity address?
  • Which of the 5Es does this lesson facilitate?
  • What questions do you have concerning the
    activity?
  • Do you facilitate similar activities in your
    classroom already?

41
Other Resources (see .pdf file for the
components of these activities)
  • Promethean Activity http//www.prometheanplanet.co
    m/en/Resources/Item/64235/types-of-food
  • http//www.abpischools.org.uk/page/modules/balance
    ddiet/.cfm?coSiteNavigation_allTopic1

42
Other Ideas?
  • Have students log what they eat before and after
    studying food. Have students create circle
    graphs comparing before food study with after
    food study.
  • Bring in food itemslike cereal, etc. and have
    student pour what they think a serving size is.
    Compare with the actual serving size.
  • Create molecules (fat, carbohydrates, etc) with
    different colored paperclips to see where the
    energy comes from when the food is broken down by
    the body.
  • Personalized Diet Plan (for students)
    (http//www.choosemyplate.gov/myplate/index.aspx)
  • A Variety of Activities http//www.choosemyplate.g
    ov
  • Food For Thought Making the Grade Through
    Healthful Eating (www.nutritionnc.com)

43
Resources
  • Wikispace
  • http//wsfcselementaryscience.wikispaces.com/
  • Edmodo
  • http//wsfcs.edmodo.com/
  • Parking Lot
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