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11.1 Role Models

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Title: 11.1 Role Models Author: M. C. McLaughlin Last modified by: Erik Created Date: 12/27/2006 2:06:27 AM Document presentation format: On-screen Show (4:3) – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: 11.1 Role Models


1
TERMS DEFINITIONS
role model someone whose character, behavior, attitude, personality, or skills serve as a good example to follow
public role models people whom you admire because of their impact on the community or on society
personal role models people in your household or neighborhood that you have known for a long time and whose behavior you admire
formal role models those persons who have earned your admiration in a formal or professional way
informal role models those persons whom you know casually and whose skills and talents you admire
2
Finding Role models
TERMS DEFINITIONS
peer role models other students who exhibit character traits that you respect and appreciate
underrepresented groups groups of individuals from minority cultures
3
Modeling and Mentoring Helping Others to Lead
4
Role Model Assignment
  • Role Model Someone you can look up to and
    admire. They should inspire you to work harder,
    choose healthful behaviors and have a positive
    influence on your life.
  • Examples can include peers, parents, and
    siblings, even people whom youve never met.

5
What Is a Role Model?
  • A role model is someone whose character,
    behavior, attitude, personality, or skills serve
    as a good example to follow.  
  • People tend to look for role models to fill some
    need in their lives. 
  • The desire to strengthen a personal
    characteristic, develop leadership skills, or
    fulfill a role to which you aspire can lead you
    to seek role models.

6
Keeping It Real
  • False role models
  • My be in it for themselves and not concerned
    about the effects on others, fans, friends,
    family.
  • True role models
  • Are consistent with their beliefs Washington, Dr.
    Martin Luther King.
  • Historical role models
  • Some have interesting pasts some good some not so
    good?

7
All That Glitters Is Not Gold
  • Your emotional investment in famous personalities
    sometimes leads you to see them as role models.
  • In some instances you may put someone on a podium
    only to be disappointed.
  • Many famous people have no desire to be
    considered role models. Consider reality stars!
    Or those thrown into stardom.

Beauty Queen
8
Public and Personal Role Models
  • Public role models are people whom you admire
    because of their impact on the community or on
    society.
  • Athletes, celebrities the major or local city
    council members.
  • People in your household or neighborhood that you
    have known for a long time and whose behavior you
    admire are personal role models.
  • For me that was Mr. Hall.

9
Watch out for some role models they aren't all
ways who you think they are.
  • Brett Cohen our fake celebrity
  • http//www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2192748/Al
    most-famous-Student-hires-bodyguards-paparazzi-ent
    ourage-pranks-New-York-believing-world-famous-cele
    brity.html

10
Formal and Informal Role Models
  • Formal role models are those persons who have
    earned your admiration in a formal or
    professional way.
  • Formal roles are often earned positions of
    society and people you have developed
    relationships with your Doctor or teacher may fit
    into this category.
  • Those persons whom you know casually and whose
    skills and talents you admire are informal role
    models.
  • Informal role models may fall into admiring
    someone because they have a great talent like
    great at basketball or public speaking skills.

11
Where Do You Find Role Models?
  • Home
  • Community
  • http//www.youtube.com/watch?vSbDFTdfKTd0
  • Leadership from the dancing guy
  • School
  • Peer role models are other students who exhibit
    character traits that you respect and appreciate.
  • Job

12
Role Models for Minority Groups
  • For underrepresented groupsgroups of individuals
    from minority culturesfinding role models in
    school or in the workplace who are like them,
    based on race, culture, gender, or ethnicity, is
    sometimes difficult to do.
  • Underrepresented groups can find role models in
    public figures.
  • Underrepresented individuals can also turn to
    role models who are different from them.

13
Somebody Is Watching You!
  • Be aware that people are watching you and try to
    avoid negative behaviors.
  • When you work to serve as a positive role model,
    others may follow your lead and avoid hanging out
    with the groups that will lead them into
    increasingly negative behaviors.

14
WORKOUT ONE
  • Complete Workout one modeling and mentoring on
    the Unit 3 Handout

15
Mentors and Mentoring
TERMS DEFINITIONS
mentor a person who engages in a supporting and guiding relationship with another person, usually over an extended period of time
mentee the individual who is the recipient of the support
mentoring a planned set of interactions and opportunities that occur during the relationship between the mentor and mentee
16
The Mentoring Relationship
  • A mentor is a person who engages in a supporting
    and guiding relationship with another person,
    usually over an extended period of time.
  • A mentor provides caring, motivation, mutual
    trust, respect, guidance, support, encouragement,
    constructive comments and suggestions, and
    expertise in some area of need in another
    persons life.

17
The Mentoring Relationship
  • The mentee is the individual who is the recipient
    of the support.
  • The mentee benefits from the kindness, patience,
    and generosity of the person who is acting as the
    mentor.

18
The Mentoring Relationship
  • Mentoring is a planned set of interactions and
    opportunities that occur during the relationship
    between the mentor and mentee.
  • Persons serving in the role of mentor are
    sometimes called adviser, counselor, tutor,
    teacher, coach, or sponsor.
  • Many times people are involved in a mentoring
    relationship, but they do not call the other
    person their mentor.

19
The Relationship Makes the Difference
  • The presence of a relationship and friendship at
    a somewhat personal level is the major difference
    between a role model and a mentor.
  • Although the mentoring relationship can be
    positive or negative, it is in the best interest
    of the mentee to seek a positive and healthy
    person who can help improve the quality of the
    mentees life in some measurable way.

20
A Mentor Is a Role Model
  • Keep in mind that a mentor is a role model, but a
    role model is not always a mentor.

21
Finding the Right Mentor
  • When trying to find a mentor, it may be difficult
    to find a person who has all of the desired
    traits you would like to develop.
  • Finding a mentor who meets the most urgent needs
    may be the best solution.
  • You will have the opportunity to be mentored by
    many people and each can offer guidance and
    support in specific areas.

22
Identifying Potential Mentors
  • Gender
  • Nationality and race
  • Religion
  • Mutual interest
  • Personality, attitude, academic expertise, and
    skill or talent

23
Mentoring Considerations
  • Level of formality
  • Educational guidance, career development,
    personal growth coaching etc
  • Mentoring location
  • Community, place of worship, workplace or online
    groups
  • Number of individuals being mentored
  • Self help class or seminar (like Larry Widget)
  • Time frame for commitment
  • How much time can you afford to give.

24
Start with a Self-Appraisal
  • What are my needs?
  • What are my strengths and weaknesses?
  • What are my immediate goals?
  • What skills and talents do I want to improve?
  • Am I willing to work with someone of a different
    gender, nationality, race, or religion?
  • Am I willing to work with someone who has a very
    different personality than mine?
  • What are my career interests?
  • What type of training or support do I need or
    desire?
  • How much effort am I willing to put into the
    relationship?

25
WORKOUT TWO
  • Complete Workout Two Relationships
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