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Evolutionary Psychology Week 7 - Mate Selection

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Evolutionary Psychology Week 7 - Mate Selection Aim: To consider why humans express the Week 7 Mate preferences that they do. Reward: You should have a better idea as ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Evolutionary Psychology Week 7 - Mate Selection


1
Evolutionary PsychologyWeek 7 - Mate Selection
  • Aim
  • To consider why humans express the Week 7 Mate
    preferences that they do.
  • Reward
  • You should have a better idea as to why these
    preferences have come about, their function how
    individuals vary.

Running Order Mating systems Week 7 Mate
value r and K selection Mixed strategies
2
Evolutionary PsychologyWeek 7 - Mate Selection
  • Mating systems
  • Evolutionary Psychology - The forward approach
  • What we assume to be the mating system in the EEA
    acts as a hypothesis generator for what we would
    predict in the present.
  • Darwinian Social Science The backward approach
  • What we see in the present acts as a hypothesis
    generator for the EEA.

3
Evolutionary PsychologyWeek 7 - Mate Selection
  • Evolutionary Psychology
  • What can mating systems tell us about female
    choice?
  • Assume that the prevailing mating system that we
    inherited from the australopithecines was
    polygamy.
  • However, as brain size increased and the length
    of childhood grew the need for investment from
    the father of offspring grew in other words,
    there was a push from the female side toward
    monogamy.
  • Next, assume that group size facilitated direct
    female choice i.e. there were no longer saddled
    with the winner of intra-male competition.

4
Evolutionary PsychologyWeek 7 - Mate Selection
  • Evolutionary Psychology
  • What can mating systems tell us about female
    choice?
  • What sort of Week 7 Mate preferences would
    females exhibit?
  • Preparedness to invest
  • Ability to invest
  • Emotional economic fidelity
  • Ability to offer protection.

5
Evolutionary PsychologyWeek 7 - Mate Selection
  • Evolutionary Psychology
  • What can our mating systems tell us about male
    choice?
  • Again, assume that the prevailing mating system
    that we inherited from the australopithecines
    was polygamy.
  • And, again, assume that there was pressure on
    males toward a monogamous system which would
    have suited those who lost out altogether in a
    polygamous system.
  • Notice that in such circumstances the potential
    RS of males is now tied to that of females i.e.
    a ceiling is imposed.

6
Evolutionary PsychologyWeek 7 - Mate Selection
  • Evolutionary Psychology
  • What can mating systems tell us about male
    choice?
  • What sort of Week 7 Mate preferences would males
    exhibit?
  • Fertility
  • Health
  • Preparedness to invest
  • Sexual fidelity.

7
Evolutionary PsychologyWeek 7 - Mate Selection
  • What do women want in men?
  • Kindness understanding
  • Intelligence
  • Exciting personality
  • Good health
  • Adaptability
  • Physical attractiveness
  • Creativity
  • Earning capacity
  • Graduate
  • Desire for children
  • Good stock
  • Good housekeeper
  • Chastity
  • What do men want in women?
  • Kindness understanding
  • Intelligence
  • Physical attractiveness
  • Exciting personality
  • Good health
  • Adaptability
  • Creativity
  • Chastity
  • Desire for children
  • Graduate
  • Good stock
  • Earning capacity
  • Good housekeeper

Adapted from Buss, 1989 1998
8
Evolutionary PsychologyWeek 7 - Mate Selection
r and K the same structure can be applied
within a species
r small size of organism K large size of organism
energetic cost is low energetic cost is high
many offspring few offspring
early maturity late maturity after parental care
short life expectancy long life expectancy
each individual reproduces only once individuals can reproduce more than once
most of the individuals die, a few live much longer most individuals live to near the maximum life span
9
Evolutionary PsychologyWeek 7 - Mate Selection
  • Mixed Strategies Biological psychological
    indicators
  • The Coolidge Effect
  • Men have lower Week 7 Mate quality standards.
  • More willing to have a causal sexual encounter
    with a stranger and more often.
  • Sexual jealousy.
  • Why would we be jealous if we were fundamentally
    monogamous?
  • Sperm competition.
  • Sperm competition could only have evolved if it
    was common for women to have sex with different
    males over periods of 0 to 6 days.

10
Evolutionary PsychologyWeek 7 - Mate Selection
  • Mixed Strategies
  • Whats in it for females?
  • Paternal confusion genetic spread bets.
  • Social exchange sex as a reciprocation.
  • Social climbing the Week 7 Mate Switching
    Hypotheses .
  • What are the costs for females?
  • Reputation If males value fidelity, cues at
    variance with this would be a disadvantage.
  • Spousal abuse.

11
Evolutionary PsychologyWeek 7 - Mate Selection
Teens
Week 7 Mate choice maturation For females . . .
. . . . . .
  • Polygamy
  • Polyandry
  • Serial Monogamy
  • Monogamy
  • Polygyny?

Mid-20s
12
Evolutionary PsychologyWeek 7 - Mate Selection
Teens
Week 7 Mate choice maturation For males . . . .
. . . . .
  • Polygamy
  • Polygyny
  • Serial Monogamy
  • Monogamy
  • Polyandry?

Mid-20s
13
Evolutionary PsychologyWeek 7 - Mate Selection
  • Mate value
  • Health
  • Age
  • Status
  • The market place
  • Media
  • Honest dishonest advertising

14
Evolutionary PsychologyWeek 7 - Mate Selection
Mate value r and K selection
Females Males
  • We might predict an asymmetry in the behaviour of
    high value males and high value females.
  • And an asymmetry in low value females and low
    value males.

Mate value
No. of Mates
15
Evolutionary PsychologyWeek 7 - Mate Selection
  • Findings from Social Psychology of attraction
  • We are attracted to ...
  • Similar others
  • Those with whom we have repeated contact
  • Those who like us
  • Those with whom we experience stress
  • Assortative mating The Matching Hypothesis
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