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SAFETY

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Title: SAFETY


1
SAFETY
  • ACCT-BVP1-3. Students will understand and follow
    safety procedures when working with TV equipment.
  • a.) State general safety rules for operation of
    equipment and learning activities.
  • b.) Perform safe practices when working on
    assignments.
  • c.) Transport equipment safely and securely.

2
Safety
  • BE SAFE, BE SMART! It is not only your right to
    be
  • safe, but your responsibility to protect yourself
    and
  • others from hazards. Always mount your
    productions
  • safely and legally, observing all the regulations
    for
  • your school and the laws governing your location.

3
GENERAL SAFETY
  • ELECTRICITY
  • Electricity can kill and cause fires and
    explosions. Never interfere with electrical
    systems or overload circuits. Portable electrical
    equipment (anything with a plug) must be suitable
    and safe for use, regularly inspected and tested
    by competent people and accompanied by requisite
    records/certificates. Keep drink/fluids away from
    electrical equipment.
  • Electricity can inflict electric shock and burns.
    Work on electrical systems must only be done by
    trained and competent people.
  • Electrical equipment must be suitable for its
    work in terms of strength and capability,
    especially in film/TV, where equipment is
    regularly used in temporary installations.
  • Always plan for the amount and type of power
    required. Generators must provide the right
    power, voltage and switching ability. Where
    multiple-phase supply is used, keep cables and
    appliances on each leg far enough away from each
    other to avoid the risk of someone receiving a
    double electric shock across different phases.

4
GENERAL SAFETY
  • ?ELECTRICITY AT WORK
  • ? Work on electrical systems must only be done by
    competent individuals. All conductors, equipment
    as well as cables, must be properly insulated and
    adequately earthed. Circuit breakers such as
    residual current devices (RCDs) must be used, but
    not as substitutes for fundamental safety
    measures (e.g. grounding or insulation).

5
GENERAL SAFETY
  • ?Slips, Trips, and Falls
  • ? On set or in a studio, there are many cords
    cables. Cables must be safely routed or covered
    to prevent trips or falls and to protect the
    integrity and insulation.
  • ? When working on scaffolding, ladders, and other
    high places make sure you are properly secured
    and always work with a spotter in case of falls.

6
GENERAL SAFETY
  • ?Cable Wrapping 101
  • One of the most important things you can learn is
    how to wrap cables for your sound system. A
    properly wrapped cable will not only lay flat
    without any loops to trip your musicians, but the
    wire itself will last longer since there's less
    stress on the conductors. And that means fewer
    sound failures during a worship service,
    something we can all aspire to. Perhaps the most
    common method is called an over-under shop wrap.
    This procedure pre-twists the wire clockwise and
    counterclockwise with each loop, so the
    cable will lay out without any twists.

7
GENERAL SAFETY
  • Start with the male XLR connector in your left
    hand and make a clockwise loop of the cable with
    your right hand.

8
GENERAL SAFETY
  • Make a full circle and catch the cable in your
    left hand to complete the "over" loop.

9
GENERAL SAFETY
  • Now move your right hand out about 2 feet along
    the cable and start pushing back at your left
    hand a bit, twisting the cable counterclockwise
    in your right hand.

10
GENERAL SAFETY
  • Bring this new loop under the front edge of the
    newly forming coil.

11
GENERAL SAFETY
  • Catch this new loop with your left hand to
    complete the coil.

12
GENERAL SAFETY
  • Start again with the over loop.... then an under
    loop... then an over loop
  •  
  • Rinse.... Repeat

13
GENERAL SAFETY
  • Once you're finished with all the loops, use a
    Velcro cable lock to keep it from uncoiling.

14
GENERAL SAFETY
  • ?WORKING AT HEIGHT
  • ?Falls from height are the single most common
    cause of death at work.
  • Suitable steps must be taken to prevent anyone
    being struck or being
  • injured by a falling object. Any situation with a
    risk of falling two meters
  • (about six feet) or more is particularly
    hazardous. If someone could fall
  • more than two meters there must be a safe working
    platform, a guardrail
  • at waist high, toe-boards (if necessary) and
    barriers. There should be an
  • exclusion zone immediately below the platform.
    Where any of these are
  • not possible, a personal safety line with belt or
    harness is required.
  • Equipment suspended at height eg, lights,
    lighting accessories should have its own
    independent safety bonds to prevent it from
    falling. Scaffolding and rigging must only be
    done by suitably qualified, competent people.
  • Special rules apply to mobile work platforms and
    other lifting equipment, and ladders.
  • Where necessary, hard hats and safety shoes
    should be worn.

15
GENERAL SAFETY
  • ?LIFTING AND OTHER WORK EQUIPMENT
  • ?Never struggle to lift something, if you have to
    struggle, it is to heavy and you should get help.
  • ?Properly lift all equipment as some equipment
    may be damaged if they are improperly picked up
    and moved.
  • ?Lift with your legs, not your back.

16
GENERAL SAFETY
  • ?LIFTING AND OTHER WORK EQUIPMENT
  • ?Important rules apply to the design, guarding,
    sitting, installation, inspection, use,
    maintenance and repair of work equipment,
    including lifting and mobile work equipment.
    Individuals in control of tools, machinery and
    other work equipment and how, when and where they
    are used, are now legally responsible for their
    safe operation to the extent of their control.
    1st Assistant directors (Ads) must be clear who
    is in control (or shared control) of equipment on
    set.

17
GENERAL SAFETY
  • ?MANUAL HANDLING
  • Work involving lifting, pushing, pulling or
    moving a load may cause harm by damaging muscles,
    tendons and other soft tissues. Risks increase
    with fatigue or cold, awkward or heavy loads,
    repeated handling, pregnancy or previous back
    problems. Employers should assess and plan
    lifting operations. They must
  • ? avoid hazardous handling wherever practicable
    (eg, redesigning tasks or loads)
  • ? assess unavoidable risks, taking account of
    individual capability
  • ? reduce risks eg, using appropriate lifting
    equipment avoiding trip hazards or obstacles
    ensuring that pregnant women and people with past
    back injuries dont move hazardous loads working
    in teams, or breaking up large loads into smaller
    manageable loads
  • ? provide training in safe manual handling
    techniques.

18
GENERAL SAFETY
  • NOISE
  • Employers must reduce noise levels as far as
    practicable, assess and record high noise levels,
    and inform people of results. They must provide
    protective equipment and mark compulsory ear
    protection zones.
  • At noise levels at or above 85 dB(A) averaged
    over eight hours, employers must provide
    employees/students with ear protection on
    request.
  • At noise levels at or above 90 dB(A) over eight
    hours or very loud noises (eg, explosions) over
    140 dB, employers must provide employees/students
    with ear protection and they must wear it.

19
GENERAL SAFETY
20
GENERAL SAFETY
  • WORKING TIME AND STRESS
  • Long working hours can cause fatigue and stress.
    Cumulative effects can make you more prone to
    errors and accidents, infections or long term ill
    health, or falling asleep at the wheel.
  • Working hours should not put your health safety
    or welfare at risk.
  • Most people should not work more than 12 hours a
    day, Additional hours are voluntary.
  • By law you are entitled to rest breaks.

21
GENERAL SAFETY
  • ?CANTEEN AND REFRESHMENT FACILITIES
  • Special dietary requirements should be catered
    for and meal/refreshment breaks provided at
    regular intervals.
  • Drinking water should be available at all times
    dehydration is a health risk.

22
GENERAL SAFETY
  • ?HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES
  • You are entitled by law to information about any
    hazardous substances involved in your work and to
    protection from any risks involved.
  • COSHH assessments must be carried out by
    productions in advance.
  • Risks of infection, sensitization or allergy must
    also be adequately assessed and controlled.
  • Exposure to dust, smoke or fumes created for
    effects should be without risk to health and
    controlled at all times.
  • It is important that you are informed in advance
    of any substances that might adversely affect
    you, including those related to particular
    locations or working with animals.
  • Some people are more susceptible than others to
    risks from hazardous substances, especially
    children, the elderly and pregnant women, and
    people who are asthmatic or sensitized to certain
    substances.
  • Particular care should be taken to protect
    pregnant women and young children when working
    with or near animals.

23
GENERAL SAFETY
  • BULLYING, HARASSMENT AND STRESS AT WORK
  • You are entitled to a work environment free from
    harassment, bullying or other inappropriate
    behavior. Risk assessments should include
    measures to prevent and reduce work related
    stress and promote good working relationships.

24
GENERAL SAFETY
  • IF THINGS GO WRONG
  • Always report accidents and near-misses to your
    instructor or onsite supervisor.
  • If you think there is a production health and
    safety problem, tell whoever is in charge.
  • Report any dangers to yourself or others put it
    in writing.
  • Dont delay there is no point in waiting for an
    accident or injury to happen.

25
GENERAL SAFETY
  • ?WAITING AREAS
  • While on the job, you should be provided with
  • ? temporary seating and rest facilities long
    periods of standing should be avoided
  • ? protection from the elements (especially strong
    sunlight, wind or draughts, rain and cold, etc)
    with adequate heating, lighting, ventilation, and
    drying facilities if needed
  • ? ready access to clean sanitary and washing
    facilities and private changing areas.

26
GENERAL SAFETY
  • ?Fire prevention
  • ? Design and construction should not compromise
    emergency procedures and/or fire precautions
    (including fire lanes, grids, ventilation, etc)
    sets must never obstruct fire lanes, signs or
    emergency exits
  • ? carry out fire risk assessments and implement
    preventive measures such as fire escape routes
  • ? always specify that materials are fire
    retardant or flame-proofed and appropriate fire
    protection measures have been provided
  • ? always consult the fire officer on site on all
    fire prevention measures.

27
GENERAL SAFETY
  • ?Warnings and signage
  • ? where risks cannot be eliminated, appropriate
    signage markings/warnings must be put in place.

28
OFFICE/CLASSROOM PRODUCTION SUPPORT SAFETY
  • ?noise, interruptions and other stressors
  • ? lack of screen breaks or physical exercise
  • ? prolonged lack of fresh air or natural light
  • ? radiation emissions (particularly from screen
    backs and sides) a possible further cause of
    stress and ill-health, especially during
    pregnancy.
  • Whether you are a permanent employee or
    freelance, or working on someone elses premises,
    your employer must ensure that workstations are
    properly set up.
  • Flexible workstation design, capable of
    individual adjustment, is essential where
    workstations are shared or used by freelance or
    temporary workers.
  • Employees/students are entitled to free eye tests
    at the employers expense.

29
OFFICE/CLASSROOM PRODUCTION SUPPORT SAFETY
  • ?Remember to
  • ? adjust your chair and monitor height
  • ? avoid twisting, stooping or slouching postures
  • ? use a footrest if necessary
  • ? consider wrist rests to keep wrists horizontal
    and reduce arm strain
  • ? take regular breaks, ideally five minutes in
    every 30 minutes
  • ? vary tasks get up and move around (ie, avoid
    other close work). Try alternating with phone
    calls, photocopying, visiting other areas, etc
  • ? do regular stretching and relaxation exercises,
    and encourage others to do the same.
  • ? NEVER work round the clock or through pain.
    Simple adjustments to workstations and/or
    equipment may help seek competent advice. Your
    employer must provide health and safety
    information, training and instruction in how to
    recognize these issues and avoid problems. Never
    ignore symptoms such as numbness or tingling in
    the fingers, wrists report them and get advice
    on preventing Carpel Tunnel Syndrome. The earlier
    you do so, the less likely you are to suffer
    long-term problems.

30
OFFICE/CLASSROOM PRODUCTION SUPPORT SAFETY
  • ?LONE WORKING
  • ?You may find yourself working alone or
    travelling alone. Lone workers, especially women,
    may be vulnerable to unwelcome advances from
    petty harassment to physical assault.
  • Isolated activities including leaving the
    workplace alone should be avoided. Premises
    should be soundly constructed, with locks on
    doors and windows, with secure and well-lit
    access and egress (including parking areas).
  • Where lone working or travelling is unavoidable,
    security provision and good communications are
    essential including mobile phones, regular
    telephone check-ins, alarms and emergency
    hotlines.
  • Some individuals may wish to carry personal
    protective items, eg, pepper sprays, rape alarms,
    etc.
  • Employers should minimize lone working and
    protect against risks by always planning for
    personal security, increasing staffing levels,
    rescheduling working hours or providing adequate
    security cover as necessary.

31
FIRST ASSISTANT DIRECTOR
  • ?Always plan for the amount and type of power
    required. Generators must provide the right
    power, voltage, and switching ability.
  • Where multiple phase supply is used, keep cables
    and appliances on each leg far enough away from
    each other to avoid the possibility of someone
    receiving a double electric shock across
    different phases.
  • All conductors and equipment, as well as cables,
    must be properly insulated and adequately
    earthed. Circuit breakers, such as residual
    current devices (RCDs), must be used, but not as
    a substitute for fundamental safety measures (eg,
    grounding/insulation).
  • Cables must be safely routed or covered to
    prevent trips or falls and to protect the
    integrity and insulation. Keep cable runs as
    short as possible. Never overheat cables by
    running them close to heat sources or by running
    power through them while coiled or tied up.
  • Ensure all equipment is inspected and tested
    regularly by supplier(s) and before use
    especially equipment used on temporary
    installations, which is likely to suffer heavy
    wear and tear. Plugs and connectors used on
    location should be rugged and built for
    protection against the weather.
  • Emergency lighting must have its own independent
    power source so that a fault in one system cannot
    jeopardize the other.

32
CAMERA GRIPS SAFETY
  • All conductors, equipment and cables must be
    suitably insulated and grounded. Circuit breakers
    such as residual current devices (RCDs) must be
    used, but not as substitutes for fundamental
    safety measures.
  • Route cables safely or cover them to prevent
    trips or falls and protect their integrity and
    insulation. Keep cable runs as short as possible.
    ever overheat cables by running them close to
    heat sources or using them coiled or tied up.

33
CAMERA GRIPS SAFETY
  • Ensure all equipment is inspected and tested
    regularly by the supplier(s) equipment used on
    temporary installations often suffers heavy wear
    and tear. Plugs and connectors used on location
    should be rugged and built for protection against
    the weather.
  • Emergency lighting must be independently powered
    so that a fault in one system cannot jeopardize
    the other.

34
CAMERA GRIPS SAFETY
  • Carbon arc and discharge lamps should have
    protective glass against UV radiation. Crew may
    need glasses. Strobe lights can trigger epileptic
    seizures. Keep flickers at or below four flashes
    per second avoid the most dangerous frequency
    of around 17 flashes per second. Fit wheels to
    heavy lighting stands for easy movement. Once in
    position, lock them off and secure to an
    immovable object.

35
CAMERA GRIPS SAFETY
  • Planning should avoid unreasonable schedules,
    food or sleep deprivation and unnecessary
    retakes, especially those involving stressful or
    tiring activities.
  • If there is no accessible public transport,
    alternative transport should be provided from the
    workplace.
  • Everyone is entitled to work free from
    harassment, bullying or abuse.
  • Risk assessments should include measures to
    prevent work-related stress and promote good
    working relationships.

36
CAMERA GRIPS SAFETY
  • Do not move from place to place with the camera
    mounted on the tripod.
  • Designate one person to take responsibility for
    the camcorder and tripod at all times. That
    person is never to leave the immediate area of
    the equipment.
  • If you are hand-holding the camcorder, never set
    it down on anything except its tripod. It is
    easy to grab a camera from a table or a sidewalk
    and run. It is much harder and more conspicuous
    to snatch both camera and tripod. Also, the
    tripod makes the camera more visible, so it is
    less likely to be bumped or knocked to the
    ground.

37
CAMERA GRIPS SAFETY
  • Detach the camcorder from the tripod when
    transporting them. If the camcorder has a
    handle, never use it to lift both camera and
    tripod together. The handle is not strong enough
    to carry the weight of both pieces.
  • Always protect the camcorder from the weather.
    Keep it out of hot sun except when actually
    shooting. Do not allow it to get wet,
    particularly the delicate glass of the zoom lens.
    Plastic bags can be used to cover your camera if
    you are caught off guard in the rain, just poke a
    hole in the bag to get a clear shot.

38
CAMERA GRIPS SAFETY
  • LIGHTING
  • Lamps and lighting equipment should be inspected
    and tested before and after use.
  • Lighting equipment should be secured to suitable
    stands, scaffolds, etc. Lights and detachable
    parts (e.g. barn doors) should have independent
    safety chains or wire bonds as well as their
    clamp or bolt.
  • Lamp bulbs liable to shatter or explode should
    have small aperture wire, grills or mesh guards.
    Keep hot lamps away from combustible materials
    and sprinkler-heads

39
CAMERA GRIPS SAFETY
  • Always USE GLOVES when handling ALL LIGHTS.
  • NOTHING can be less than 2 feet in front,
    beside, above, below or behind a
  • light with the exception of the lighting stand.
  • Repeatedly check to make sure that the section
    of the light touching the stand
  • (or your hands) doesnt get hot enough to burn
    either your hands or stand.
  • If the light is too hot when you touch it with
    your gloves IT IS TOO HOT! Turn it off and wait
    five minutes before using it again. Just work on
    another light
  • during that time.
  • When using CHINA BALLS or lamps with SHADES,
    make sure the light bulb
  • stays in the middle of the shade and NEVER gets
    close to any of the sides of
  • the shade. This is a recipe for disaster. You run
    the risk of either singeing the
  • shade, ruining it forever -- or worse -- starting
    a fire.

40
CAMERA GRIPS SAFETY
  • GRID SAFETY/LIFTING/FLYING
  • Only competent personnel should be allowed in the
    grid, or to use lifting or flying equipment.
  • All tools used overhead should be suitably
    attached and all overhead equipment (eg,
    lighting) should be independently secured and
    bonded to prevent it falling on people below.
  • A clear area should be maintained under any
    overhead working.
  • Never compromise the structural integrity of the
    grid or of any flying equipment never exceed
    SWLs (Standard Weight Limits).
  • Ensure that all platforms (including audience
    seating) are structurally sound and suitable for
    the purpose.

41
SAFETY FOR THE CONSTRUCTION MANAGER
  • MANUAL HANDLING
  • Manual handling risks must be assessed and
    avoided where practicable. Check that
  • ? the design/set/props can be handled and
    transported safely with instructions on safe
    handling. Design specifications should avoid
    using heavy materials or objects involving manual
    handling risks
  • ? all loads are appropriately marked with their
    weight
  • ? all necessary equipment and training has been
    provided.

42
SAFETY FOR THE CONSTRUCTION MANAGER
  • WORK EQUIPMENT Individuals in control of tools,
    machinery and other work equipment have legal
    responsibilities for their safe operation.
    Special rules apply to mobile and lifting
    equipment.
  • If you control the use of tools, machinery or
    other work equipment (including lifting equipment
    and mobile platforms), or share control, you must
    ensure that

43
SAFETY FOR THE CONSTRUCTION MANAGER
  • ? risks of relevant work activities have been
    assessed
  • ? any work equipment (including lifting
    equipment) and PPE provided is suitable for the
    task and operators concerned work equipment is
    safely designed and installed, sited correctly,
    properly maintained, inspected/examined/tested,
    and used/operated safely and in accordance with
    manufacturers instructions
  • ? all operatives are competent and have received
    appropriate training and supervision in the use
    of that work equipment/PPE
  • ? electrical systems, guarding and emergency
    stops etc, are safe and meet legal standards and
    requirements
  • ? appropriate protective equipment is worn
    whenever and wherever required for safety
    purposes
  • ? portable electrical tools and hand tools must
    be safe for use. Wear and tear can affect not
    only the body, but also cable and electrical
    connections. Portable electrical tools should be
    low voltage (max. 110V AC).

44
SAFETY FOR THE CONSTRUCTION MANAGER
  • ?TESTS, INSPECTION AND RECORDS
  • ? Check that any necessary inspections, tests or
    certificates required for work equipment or for
    the set or scenery are carried out after
    installation and before, during, and after use
    and/or handling. Keep relevant records for which
    you are responsible, and provide copies on
    request. Inform the producer of any maintenance,
    inspection, examination or certification required
    to ensure that the set, or any work equipment
    whose use you control, continues to be safe.
    Report any problems, risks, accidents or
    near-misses to the producer (and, if required, to
    the HSE or other enforcing authority)

45
SAFETY FOR BACKGROUND ARTISTS
  • ? make-up, costumes or equipment is shared.
    Indoors, workplace temperature and ventilation
    should be comfortable at all times.
  • ? Work environments should be suitable for
    make-up and hairdressing, including adequate
    washing, changing, drying and cleaning facilities
    and refuse disposal, with enough space, seating
    and lighting to enable work activities to be
    carried out safely and hygienically.
  • ? There should be suitable storage for costumes,
    wigs, etc, without risk of infestation or damp,
    with drying facilities where necessary.
  • ? Flooring should be stable, dry and even.
  • ? Access to wagons should be safe without trip
    hazards steps should be stable and lit.
  • ? Materials, supplies, products and work
    equipment (including aerosol sprays and
    cosmetics) should be free from risks to health
    and safety electrical equipment must be
    properly tested and maintained.

46
SAFETY FOR PAINTERS
  • ?any work equipment (including lifting equipment)
    and, if necessary, personal protective equipment
    (PPE) provided, is suitable for the task and for
    the operators concerned
  • ? work equipment is safely designed and
    installed, sited correctly, properly maintained,
    inspected/examined/tested, and used/ operated
    safely and in accordance with manufacturers
    instructions, and is accompanied by the requisite
    inspection report or test certificate(s).

47
SAFETY FOR PLASTERERS
  • ?Where this is not possible, the duty on the
    employer is to reduce the risk to the lowest
    level reasonably practicable by taking steps such
    as
  • ? avoiding slippery floors or obstacles
  • ? ensuring that vulnerable individuals eg,
    people with a history of back trouble are not
    required to move loads
  • ? working in teams
  • ? breaking up large loads into smaller,
    manageable loads.
  • Training in good lifting techniques is also
    useful but is not an alternative to these safety
    measures.

48
SAFETY FOR RIGGERS SCAFFOLDERS
  • ?Regularly/routinely inspected if there is a
    significant risk from deterioration or
    exceptional circumstances.
  • There must be proper systems for inspect,
    maintenance and repair, with records kept and
    supplied where necessary to users and others.
  • Work equipment includes tools, machinery and
    other equipment (powered and non-powered) and
    equipment hired in from another company.
    Equipment moved from one place to another must be
    accompanied by an inspection report. Inspections
    must be carried out after installation and before
    use, and then at least annually for lifting
    equipment and at least every six months for
    equipment used to lift people. Written inception
    reports must be kept.
  • Special additional rules apply to mobile and/or
    self-controlled remote work equipment, power
    presses, lifting equipment and equipment used to
    carry people. For mobile work equipment, these
    include design, stability, rollover protection,
    protective equipment/harnesses, emergency
    braking, lighting etc.
  • Lifting equipment covers lifting equipment and
    any attachments for anchoring, fixing or
    supporting it, including tools used for lifting
    or lowering loads (eg, crowbars). Lifting
    operations must be planned, supervised and
    carried out safely.

49
SAFETY FOR RIGGERS SCAFFOLDERS
  • Equipment suspended at height eg, lights,
    lighting accessories should have its own
    independent safety bands to prevent it falling.
  • Portable electrical tools (eg, drills) and hand
    tools (eg, screwdrivers) must be suitable and
    safe for use, inspected regularly and repaired
    when necessary. Powered machinery must only be
    operated by trained and competent workers.
  • Electricity can kill. Work on electrical systems
    and lighting systems must only be done by
    suitably experienced and competent individuals.
    All conductors, equipment as well as cables, must
    be suitable and safe for use, properly insulated
    and adequately earthed. Circuit breakers, such as
    residual current devices (RCDs) must be used but
    are not substitutes for fundamental safety (eg,
    grounding or insulation). Equipment for use
    outdoors must be suitable and safe for such use.

50
SAFETY FOR STAGEHANDS
  • ?lowering loads (eg crowbars). Lifting operations
    must be planned, supervised and carried out
    safely.
  • Equipment suspended at heights eg, lights,
    lighting accessories should have its own
    independent safety bonds to prevent it falling.
    Lifting equipment must only be operated by
    trained and competent workers.
  • Forklift truck operators could be trained on an
    approved training scheme. They should carry with
    them written proof that they have been trained
    and that their training remains valid.
  • Basic safety rules include
  • ? work on a level, stable surface
  • ? keep away from overhead power lines and
    obstructions
  • ? never exceed the safe working load
  • ? keep to designated traffic lanes.

51
SAFETY FOR STAGEHANDS
  • ?Portable electrical tools (eg, drills) and hand
    tools (eg, screwdrivers) must be suitable and
    safe for use, inspected regularly and repaired
    when necessary. Powered machinery must only be
    operated by trained and competent workers.
  • Electricity can kill. Work on electrical systems
    and lighting systems must only be done by
    suitably experienced and competent individuals.
    All conductors, equipment as well as cables, must
    be suitable and safe for use, properly insulated
    and adequately earthed.
  • Circuit breakers such as residual current devices
    (RCDs) must be used but are not substitutes for
    fundamental safety (eg, grounding or insulation).
    Equipment for use outdoors must be suitable and
    safe for such use.

52
SAFETY FOR SET DESIGN
  • Minimize storage of set props and scenery, as
    they are a fire hazard.
  • All suspended sets or scenery should be secured.
  • Avoid using glass. Use plexiglass, or sugar
    glass instead. If using regular glass, it should
    be safety glass.

53
SAFETY FOR SET DESIGN
  • Scaffolding used as props does not require
    inspection.
  • Video walls may collapse and must be adequately
    designed and constructed.
  • Counterbalance the wall
  • Fasten all monitors to each other and the main
    structure.
  • Electrical load should be evaluated.

54
WORKING ON LOCATION
  • ?Electrical equipment must be compatible with
    local mains electricity supply systems, and must
    avoid risks such as overload, fire or explosion.
    Battery performance may vary with extremes of
    temperature. Particular care should be taken when
    working in domestic premises, outdoors or on
    derelict sites. Make sure that all equipment is
    inspected and tested regularly by the supplier(s)
    equipment used on temporary installations is
    likely to suffer heavy wear and tear. Plugs and
    connectors used on location should be rugged and
    built for protection against the weather.
    Emergency lighting must be supplied from its own
    independent power source so that a fault in one
    system cannot jeopardize the other.

55
WORKING ON LOCATION
  • ?DERELICT SITES AND CONTAMINATED LAND
  • Derelict sites and contaminated land expose crew
    and cast to hazards. A full risk assessment must
    be carried out before work starts. Possible risks
    include unstable structures, walls and floors
    broken glass hazardous substances (eg, asbestos,
    lead paint, toxic residues) gas leaks
    contaminated water or land exposed wires and
    electrical hazards biological hazards (eg, bird
    droppings, insect or animal-borne disease,
    infestation) trips and falls. Personal
    protective equipment (eg, hard hats, safety
    shoes) may be required but risks should be
    eliminated at source where possible.

56
WORKING ON LOCATION
  • ?INFECTIOUS DISEASES
  • If possible avoid locations with a risk of
    infectious disease. Otherwise ensure appropriate
    precautions, allowing the necessary lead-in time.
    Take bottled water if the local supply is
    untrustworthy. The production companys insurance
    should include first aid cover and medical
    evacuation.

57
WORKING ON LOCATION
  • ?WATER
  • Work on or near rivers, ponds, lakes, and the sea
    presents numerous hazards, notably risks of
    drowning. They include tides and currents
    storms biological/viral hazards (eg, Weils
    disease) cold and hypothermia electric shock
    (DC is safer than AC) collision with underwater
    objects attacks by animals, sharks etc. Suitable
    lifejackets (not buoyancy aids) should always be
    worn, with small jackets for children. Lifelines
    may also be needed. Any boat used for filming
    should be suitable and seaworthy and captained by
    a qualified skipper. Underwater work is covered
    by the Diving Operations at Work Regulations.
    Each job must be controlled by a diving
    contractor registered with the HSE.

58
WORKING ON LOCATION
  • ?OTHER LOCATION ISSUES
  • Geography, weather and climate should be
    considered seasonal variations, excessive heat
    or cold, wind, altitude, environment, remote
    locations, wildlife, difficult terrain, etc. may
    affect what you can do safely, and when, where
    and how you can do it. At locations exposed to
    extreme weather or climate conditions the
    production company should provide suitable
    special clothing, hot food and drink in cold
    conditions, and ample liquid in hot conditions.
    Work equipment must be safe, suitable, well
    maintained, thoroughly inspected after
    transport/installation, accompanied by
    documentation/ records, and safely operated.
    Different equipment and operating standards may
    apply abroad information must be obtained
    beforehand. Protective clothing is necessary for
    wet, cold and hot weather working. Employers are
    responsible for providing protection suitable for
    the conditions and individual user(s). Costumes
    must provide necessary protection if this is
    not possible, other means of protection are
    essential, using alternative production methods
    or timings if necessary. Hypothermia,
    dehydration, heat exposure and skin cancer can
    kill. Welfare facilities and refreshment are
    important particularly when working in extremes
    of temperature. Uncontaminated drinking water and
    suitable washing and sanitary facilities must
    always be readily available to all concerned.
    Take precautions against risks of food
    contamination.

59
MANAGING THE SHOOTING SESSION
  • Do not ask people to perform feats for the camera
    that they would not normally attempt.
    Professional stunt people are highly trained,
    very experienced, and well paid for taking risks.
    Your cast and crew are not.
  • Do not put the crew at risk, (say, by hanging out
    over balconies or climbing on high roofs) in
    pursuit of interesting camera angles.

60
MANAGING THE SHOOTING SESSION
  • Remember that the videographer is concentrating
    intently on the viewfinder, it is easy for that
    person to run into objects or stumble on stairs.
    An assistant should guide the videographer during
    moving shots.
  • Get permission and be courteous when shooting in
    public so that you are not ban from filming in
    certain areas.
  • You should not film anyone if you do not have
    written permission to use their image.

61
MANAGING THE SHOOTING SESSION
  • Be smart, you are using a video camera that
    captures video and sound. Do not do or say
    anything that you would not be comfortable with
    your parents or an administrator seeing or
    hearing.
  • You must tell your teacher where you are going
    before you leave the classroom to film. You must
    be where you said you would be in case your
    teacher or the front office needs to find you.
    You may only be out of the classroom for 20
    minutes at a time.

62
WORKING ABROAD
  • ?equipment and supplies (including
    transportation)
  • ? personal baggage, money and other effects.
  • Check small print for exclusions (eg, items over
    a certain value, specific activities/equipment/are
    as/locations/travel, pregnancy, medical
    conditions or war zones). Insurance must cover
    all work activities, locations and risks.
    Specialist insurance can be arranged never go
    under-insured.
  • Ensure easy access to essential documents, as
    well as help and money, in emergencies.
  • If choosing to arrive in the country ahead of
    schedule or return later, the extra insurance
    cover is your responsibility.

63
WORKING ABROAD
  • ?GETTING THERE
  • Working abroad means getting people, equipment
    and supplies there and back again safely. Risk
    assessments should cover any manual handling,
    transport or security risks and hazardous
    substances involved.
  • When hiring or driving vehicles abroad, select
    the safest means of transport available. Check
    local regulations and insurance cover.
  • Take special precautions and seek expert advice
    when filming covertly or in hostile environments.

64
WORKING ABROAD
  • ?SCHEDULES/ITINERARIES
  • Scheduling arrangements should take account of
  • ? distance, destination and means of transport
  • ? how long or tiring the journey is, risks of
    jetlag or fatigue, or allowances needed for
    familiarization or acclimatization
  • ? climate and environment
  • ? whether planned activities are practicable or
    permitted at all times
  • ? schedules must not put health, safety or
    welfare at risk.

65
WORKING ABROAD
  • ?WORKING ABROAD
  • Geographic and climatic conditions (eg, seasonal
    variations, excessive heat or cold, wind,
    altitude, environment, remote locations,
    wildlife, difficult terrain, etc.) may affect
    what you can do safely, and when, where and how
    you can do it.
  • Equipment must be safe, suitable, well
    maintained, thoroughly inspected after
    transport/installation, and accompanied by the
    requisite documentation/records, and safely
    operated. Different equipment and operating
    standards may apply abroad information must be
    obtained beforehand.
  • Electrical equipment must be compatible with
    local mains electricity supply systems. Battery
    performance may vary with extremes of
    temperature.
  • Protective clothing is necessary for wet, cold
    and hot weather working. Employers are
    responsible for providing protection suitable for
    the conditions and individual user(s). Costumes
    must provide necessary protection if this is
    not possible, other means of protection are
    essential, using alternative production methods
    or timings if necessary. Hypothermia,
    dehydration, heat exposure and skin cancer can
    kill.
  • Refreshment is important when working abroad,
    particularly in extremes of temperature.
  • Uncontaminated drinking water must always be
    readily available to all concerned. Take
    precautions against risks of food contamination
    if necessary.

66
WORKING ABROAD
  • ?COMMUNICATIONS AND LANGUAGE
  • Communications are important when working abroad
    and may be necessary with
  • ? the employer/production office/UK base
  • ? the local embassy/high commission/consulate
  • ? local authorities
  • ? reliable local help/support
  • ? local contracts/interviewees/contributors
  • ? other crew/team members.
  • Communications may need adapting for languages,
    technical reasons and ensuring co-operation.
    Health and safety information, instructions and
    warning notices must be included. Risk
    assessments may need translation.
  • Always leave details (itinerary, flights,
    passport number, etc.) and copies of essential
    documents in a safe place in case of theft or
    emergencies. If travelling alone or under cover,
    special arrangements must be made for regular
    contact and support.

67
WORKING ABROAD
  • ?WORKING RELATIONSHIPS
  • Work environments should be free of
    discrimination, harassment or bullying. Risk
    assessments should include measures to prevent
    work related stress and promote good working
    relationships.

68
SAFETY
  • REMEMBER
  • prevention
  • is better than
  • cure!

69
STUDY QUESTIONS
  • Directions On your own paper WRITE the
    following questions and their answers.
  • Whos job is it to ensure your safety and others
    safety?
  • What kind of dangers does electricity pose?
  • Why are slips, trips, and falls especially common
    on a video production set?
  • At what height does it become extremely hazardous
    to fall?
  • When lifting heavy loads, what body part(s)
    should you lift with?
  • What decibel level is considered to be the danger
    zone? Why is it particularly important to
    monitor the volume level on your headphones?
  • What are some dangers in working high stress jobs
    and/or long hours?
  • What might symptoms such as numbness or tingling
    in the fingers and wrists be a sign of? What
    causes this?
  • Why is working by yourself not advisable
    especially for women? What should men do to
    ensure safety?
  • Why should cords cables be covered?

70
STUDY QUESTIONS
  • Directions On your own paper WRITE the
    following questions and their answers.
  • What can strobe lights trigger in some people?
  • What are some things you can do to keep the
    camera safe?
  • When handling lights, what is the proper safety
    attire, why?
  • What is a lighting grid?
  • Why is it important to consider your surroundings
    when working on location?
  • What type of electrical current is safer when
    working around water?
  • Why should you not ask people to perform feats
    for the camera that they would not normally
    attempt.
  • Why should an assistant guide the videographer
    during moving shots.
  • Why is it important to remember that the camera
    records sound?
  • Where should you be if you leave the class to
    film a piece, How long should you be out of class?

71
VOCABULARY/TERMINOLOGY
Directions On your own paper WRITE the Terms
and their definitions.
  1. hazardous substances
  2. harassment
  3. freelance
  4. china ball lighting
  5. grounded (in relation to electricity, not what
    your parents do to you when you are bad)
  6. SWL
  7. barn Doors
  8. prevention
  9. risk assessment
  10. working relationship
  1. RCDs
  2. grips
  3. epileptic seizures
  4. PPE
  5. lifting equipment
  6. electricity
  7. noise
  8. Decibel
  9. Stress
  10. bullying

72
PROJECT 2
  • Using Premiere, create a PSA (Public Service
    Announcement) explaining some aspect of Safety
    presented in the previous presentation.
  • Use Pictures, sound effects, facts supporting
    your PSA, etc
  • An example may be a PSA on the dangers of
    electricity stating facts about how many people
    are killed each year by electricity related
    accidents.

73
SOURCES
  • MORE INFORMATION
  • BECTU Head Office 020 7346 0900 Scotland 0141
    314 0060 Wales 02920 666557 www.bectu.org.uk
  • BBC Safety Database www.bbc.org.uk/ohss (design
    safety/electricity/scenery)
  • London Hazards Centre 020 7794 5999
  • Health Safety Executive Info line 08701 545500
  • USEFUL PUBLICATIONS
  • BECTU Health Safety Handbook
  • HSE Entertainment and Leisure leaflets Camera
    Operations on Location The Event Safety Guide
    (HSG195)
  • HSE Entertainment and Leisure Leaflets
  • Free from HSE publications
  • Construction, Woodworking and Entertainment and
    Leisure leaflets
  • BECTU Health and Safety Handbook.Published August
    2005
  • USEFUL WEB SITES
  • BBC Safety database www.bbc.org.uk/ohss
  • HSE www.hse.gov.uk
  • Health Safety Executive Info line tel 08701
    545500 www.hse.gov.uk
  • WWW.AFI.COM American Film Institute
  • Goodheart-Wilcox Video Digital Communication
    Production, 2nd Edition
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