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ECE 1100 Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering

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ECE 1100: Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering Spring 2011 Wanda Wosik Associate Professor, ECE Dept. Notes 3 Slides adapted from lectures by – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: ECE 1100 Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering


1
ECE 1100 Introduction toElectrical and Computer
Engineering
Spring 2011
Wanda Wosik Associate Professor, ECE Dept.
Notes 3
Slides adapted from lectures by Drs. Dave
Shattuck/David Jackson/Charlson
2
Landis Chapter 1 Keys to Success
Key Idea
Each of you can be successful in earning your
BSEE.
It will take...
  • Determination
  • Effort
  • Approach

3
Set Goals
  • Goals give you something to measure yourself
    against.
  • Goals give your life direction.
  • Landis, Chapter 1.
  • Clarify your goals (this can be hard).
  • Short-term goals (next calculus exam, etc.).
  • Long-term goals (graduating with BSEE, career,
    family)

4
Set Goals
Set realistic, but high goals, and keep them
clearly in mind. That requires commitment.
Examples of goals
Summa Cum Laude 3.75 lt GPA lt 4.0 Magna Cum
Laude 3.50 lt GPA lt 3.74 Cum Laude
3.25 lt GPA lt 3.49
A 4.0 A- 3.67 B 3.33 B 3.0 B- 2.67
C 2.33 C 2.0 C- 1.67 D 1.33 D 1.0
D- 0.67 F 0.0
5
Set Goals (cont.)
Another example
Engineering Deans List (complied every semester)
  • GPA gt 3.50 that semester
  • No D, F, or U allowed
  • 9 hours or more that semester

6
Set Goals (cont.)
Another example
To make an A in ECE 2300 and ECE 2317
This is a difficult goal often, only about 50
of the students pass the course. Much fewer make
an A.
7
Determination Dont Give Up
Use failure as a lesson, not as an excuse to give
up.
Example
You dont pass ECE 2300 the first time.
What do you do?
Dont give up. Try to determine what is wrong
and take action. (Was it really a lack of
ability, or (more likely) a lack of effort?)
8
Determination Dont Give Up
One of the inspiring examples of determination
Prof. Stephen Hawking
  • Discovered "Hawking Radiation"
  • Author of "A Brief History of Time"

9
Effort Work Hard
Aptitude vs. Effort
Both are important
For MOST students Your grades will reflect your
effort as much (or even more) as your aptitude.
This is true about success in life, in general.
10
Effort Work Hard (cont.)
Quote by Thomas Edison
Genius is 1 inspiration and 99 perspiration.
Peter Principle
In time one reaches his level of incompetence
11
Approach Work Smart
  • Prioritize
  • Learn to control your time
  • Form a study group
  • Learn to use available resources
  • - computer tools
  • - instructors office hours
  • - student groups

12
Prioritizing
Assume that everything on your to-do list is
not going to get finished, and make sure that the
things that dont get finished are the least
important things.
Ask yourself Am I doing the most important
things right now?
13
Prioritizing (cont.)
High Priority Items
  • Doing homework
  • Reading class material and coming to class
    prepared.
  • Taking advantage of problem sessions.
  • Making time to see your instructor during office
    hours
  • (especially when you are not clear on how to
    approach a
  • homework problem).

14
Approach Work Smart
  • Prioritize
  • Learn to control your time
  • Form a study group
  • Develop good study skills
  • Learn to use available resources
  • - instructors office hours
  • - student organizations
  • - computer tools

15
Time Management
Learn to control your time
Students have trouble getting everything done,
because
  • They often dont know how to budget their time
  • They are over-committed.
  • Both

Commitments - family - work -
classes/projects/reports/labs - recreation
16
What is the Rule of 4?
Time Management (cont.)
  • Assume that you will spend 3 hours outside of
    class, for every hour in class every week (4
    hours total).
  • Example ECE 2300. This is a three hour class
    (second digit in the course number means hrs).
    There are three hours of lecture per week.
  • Rule of 4 spend 12 hours per week on that class
    (9 hours outside class, 3 hours inside class).

17
What is the Rule of 60?
Time Management (cont.)
Assume that you will have a MAXIMUM of 60 hours
per week to spend on your classes. This includes
class time, study time, homework time, etc.
This means that 15 hours of courses will occupy
all of your time!
18
Time Management (cont.)
Recommended max hours (students not on
probation) not employed 15 hours 1 - 20
hours 14 hours 20 - 30 hours 13 hours 30 -
40 hours 10 hours
19
Time Management (cont.)
Dont over commit yourself. It is more important
to have a high GPA than to graduate one semester
sooner.
This is especially true when taking your first
hard core ECE classes
ECE 2300 (Circuit Analysis) ECE 2317 (Electricity
and Magnetism)
20
Time Management (cont.)
Full time student 12 hours or more (less in the
summer).
Max. hours 19 for Engineering students (up to
22 with permission and a 3.0 GPA)
BSEE in 4 years requires 16 - 17 hours per
semester (133 total hours).
Normally, there is no minimum required number of
hours that you must enroll for each semester.
(There is a 7 year time limit on course validity,
however, for ECE courses at the 3000 level or
higher.)
21
Time Management (cont.)
Do not procrastinate!
Common scenario
  • Student gets behind in class.
  • Student makes poor grades during the semester.
  • Student approaches professor at the end, asking
    what they need to do to pass the course or do
    good in the course. (It is usually too late)
  • Student feels that he/she can make up for it on
    the final exam (almost never happens).
  • Student asks after the end of the semester Is
    there anything I can do to change my grade?
    Answer NO

22
Approach Work Smart
  • Prioritize
  • Learn to control your time
  • Form a study group
  • Develop good study skills.
  • Learn to use available resources
  • - instructors office hours
  • - student groups
  • - computer tools

23
Study Group
Try to find a small study group, because...
  • Youll learn more effectively and efficiently
  • Youll probably study more
  • Its better preparation for the real world

Q. What if it doesnt work? A. Try another
study group!
24
Study Group (cont.)
Word of Caution
Do not cross the line between studying together
and cheating together.
Recommendation
  • Discuss concepts together, approaches to a
    problem.
  • Review topics together, quiz each other.
  • Make sure that what you put on your homework is
    your own work.

25
Approach Work Smart
  • Prioritize
  • Learn to control your time
  • Form a study group
  • Develop good study skills
  • Learn to use available resources
  • - your instructor
  • - student groups (IEEE)
  • - your advisor
  • - College and Campus resources

26
Learn Good Study Skills
  • Use a study group if it helps you.
  • Take a break when you are saturated.
  • Get help when you are stuck.
  • Learn to ask yourself questions about the
    material.
  • Use homework as a guide to what you know and
    dont know.
  • Take practice exams.

27
Approach Work Smart
  • Prioritize
  • Learn to control your time
  • Form a study group
  • Develop good study skills
  • Learn to use available resources
  • - your instructor
  • - student groups (IEEE, etc.)
  • - Campus and College resources
  • - your advisor

28
Making Use of Your Professors
What your professors can do for you
  • Give you extra help and advice
  • Make suggestions for studying
  • Help you make a career choice
  • Write a recommendation letter
  • Hire you in their research lab
  • Guide you into graduate school

29
How to Annoy Your Prof.
  • Come to class late (or not at all).
  • Read outside material (e.g., a newspaper) in
    class.
  • Talk in class.
  • Sleep in class.
  • Dont turn in homework (or dont do it honestly)
    , dont visit him/her for help, then complain the
    exam was too hard.

30
How to Make Your Prof. Happy
  • Come to class on time.
  • Pay attention in class.
  • Ask questions in class.
  • Come to see the Prof. during office hours with
    good questions.
  • Do well on the homework, quizzes, exams and
    projects.

31
Go to See Your Professors
Most profs have office hours, e-mail, and voice
mail. Find out what these are.
Go to the professor if you have questions, even
if you think the questions are stupid.
Dont skip class, and then expect a private
tutoring on what you missed.
32
Approach Work Smart
  • Prioritize
  • Learn to control your time
  • Form a study group
  • Develop good study skills
  • Learn to use available resources
  • - your instructor
  • - student groups (IEEE, etc.)
  • - Campus and College resources
  • - your advisor

33
Student Groups
IEEE Student Branch
  • The Institute of Electrical and Electronics
    Engineering is
  • the largest technical professional society in
    the world.
  • The student branch is there to help you.
  • The student office is located at the back of the
    Y building (room 136-Y). Phone 713-743-4469
  • email uh.ieee_at_gmail.com
  • web http//www.ieee.uh.edu/index.php
  • Prof. Crisan is the IEEE student branch counselor.

34
Student Groups (cont.)
National Honor Societies
Tau Beta Pi (Engineering honor society) 104-D
(713) 743-4238, email tbp_at_egr.uh.edu, web
http//www2.egr.uh.edu/tbp Faculty advisorsDrs.
Betty Barr, Joe Charlson, Thomas Hebert, David
Zimmerman Eta Kappa Nu (EE honor
society) 241-Y (713) 743-4238 email
hkn_at_egr.uh.edu, webhttp//www2.egr.uh.edu/hkn/ab
outus.html Faculty advisor Dr. Joe Charlson
35
Student Groups (cont.)
Specialized Student Groups (see the campus phone
book or ECE Dept. website for contact
information look under the link people/student
organizations)
  • AIAA (American Institute of Aeronautics and
    Astronautics)
  • NSBE (National Society of Black Engineers)
  • MAES (Society of Mexican American Engineers and
    Scientists)
  • SWE (Society of Women Engineers)

36
Approach Work Smart
  • Prioritize
  • Learn to control your time
  • Form a study group
  • Develop good study skills
  • Learn to use available resources
  • - your instructor
  • - student groups (IEEE, etc.)
  • - Campus and College resources
  • - your advisor

37
Campus Resources
  • Campus Publications
  • Undergraduate Studies Catalog (course
    descriptions and many other useful things - in
    the bookstore and on online version at
    http//www.uh.edu/academics/catalog)
  • Student Handbook (from the Dean of Students
    Office and at http//www.uh.edu/dos/hdbk/index.htm
    l)
  • Telephone Directory (online directory at
    http//www.uh.edu/dir_services/)
  • Class Schedule (http//www.uh.edu/enroll/rar/class
    _schedule.html)

38
Campus Resources (cont.)
  • Campus Services
  • Learning Support Services (LSS), 321 Social Work
    Building, http//www.las.uh.edu/LSS/) tutoring
    in most subjects, and workshops in reading, study
    skills, and exam preparation.
  • UH Writing Center, 210-217 Agnes Arnold Hall
    help with writing assignments.
  • http//www.uh.edu/writecen/

39
Campus Resources (cont.)
  • Campus Services (cont.)
  • Counseling and Psychological Services (226
    Student Service Center, http//www.caps.uh.edu/)
  • Center for Students with Disabilities (CSD) (CSD
    Bldg. 568, room 100, http//www.uh.edu/csd/)
  • University Health Center (HC Bldg. 525,
    http//www.uh.edu/admin/hc/)
  • University Career Services (106 Student Service
    Center I, www.career.uh.edu)
  • Scholarships and Financial Aid (31 Ezekiel W.
    Cullen Bldg., http//www.uh.edu/enroll/sfa/)

40
Campus Resources Engineering Career Center
  • It exists to help you gain job experience and/or
    to find a job after you graduate.
  • It is available to all Engineering students.
  • Industrial Scholar Interns Program (ISIP)
  • CO-OP
  • Job fairs and workshops (the next one is on Feb.
    9th)

Director Vita Como (vcomo_at_uh.edu) Office 302-D
(713) 743-4230 http//www.egr.uh.edu/career/
41
Campus Resources Industrial Scholars Internship
Program
  • A highly competitive program that offers both
    scholarships and job experience. 3.0. GPA is
    required.
  • Students may apply to get a scholarship after
    their first year.
  • Job placement is usually done when students are
    within 45-50 hours of graduating.
  • Students get experience working for a company
    (who may decide to hire them later after they
    graduate).
  • Students work for 10-20 hrs/week and take a min
    of 12 class hrs in this semester

Manager Leslie Coward (lcoward_at_uh.edu) Office
302-D3 (713) 743-4230 http//www.egr.uh.edu/isip/
42
Campus Resources COOP
CO-OPerative Education
  • Students usually apply after taking
    sophomore-level courses.
  • Pairs of students alternate semesters between
    working for a company and attending classes (some
    part-time jobs may be available as well).
  • Students get experience working for a company
    (who may decide to hire them later after they
    graduate).
  • Required GPA 2.25.

Director Jerry Davenport Office 302-D3 (713)
743-4230 http//www.egr.uh.edu/coop/
43
Campus Resources Engineering Career Center
  • Interested?
  • Make sure that you have a valid UH email alias
    (to find out about notices).
  • Make sure that the Engineering Career Center has
    an updated copy of your resume.
  • Take advantage of the web-based system called
    eConnection.

44
Campus Resources Engineering Career Center
eConnection
The Engineering Career Center has created a
web-based system to connect employers and
students in the Cullen College of Engineering.
  • It is available to students officially enrolled
    in the Cullen College of Engineering
  • It allows students to conduct their job search
    on-line
  • It provides detailed information about employer
    job postings and interview schedules

Go to www.egr.uh.edu/career and then click on
Students and then eConnection.
45
College Resources PROMES
PROgram for the Mastery of Engineering
Studies (Promise)
Focuses on student recruitment and retention
  • academic advising
  • academic excellence workshops
  • scholarships

Location E301-D3 (713) 743-4222 http//www.egr.u
h.edu/promes/ Director Dr. Kathy
Zerda promes_at_egr.uh.edu
46
College Resources PROMES
PROMES offers study groups and social activities
that will allow you to meet people with similar
interests and courses. You will also have the
opportunity to meet former PROMES students who
are now engineers working in industry. PROMES
can help you work with the universitys Office of
Scholarships and Financial Aid and assist you in
securing grants and scholarships, and obtaining
work-study jobs on campus and summer
internships. PROMES can also direct you into a
cooperative education (Co-op) program, where you
alternate a semester of work in industry with a
semester of study on campus. PROMES offers
special courses and highly successful workshops
designed to give you a good start in engineering.
PROMES students who have successfully completed
these courses and participated in the workshops
will be able to lead study sessions and
facilitate workshops. PROMES staff work with you,
providing help and advice.
47
College Resources Computer Tools
The Engineering Computing Center (ECC) is a set
of rooms full of computers that are available for
Engineering students. It is on the first floor of
building D3 (Engr. Bldg. 2), in room W129-D3
(713-743-4241). These computers have useful
software on them.
  • Mathcad, Mathematica, Matlab (calculations)
  • Microsoft Word (word processing)
  • Microsoft Excel (data manipulation and analysis)
  • Microsoft Powerpoint (presentations)
  • Multisim (circuit simulation)
  • COMSOL Multiphysics (engineering/science)

48
College Resources Computer Tools
The ECC has three group study areas available for
student use in Room W 129K. A "reservation form"
is available at the ECC Front Desk for students
to reserve a study area in advance. Each study
area has a Wide Screen Flat Panel Monitor that
is USB compatible to a laptop. Students may
also reserve a mouse and/or a keyboard.
Whiteboards and markers are also available for
student use. The study areas are open during
regular ECC hours.
49
College Resources Computer Tools (cont.)
To get an email account
Go to the front desk inside the ECC and show
them your Cougar 1 card.
Note you should already have an email ALIAS
(e.g., jsmith_at_uh.edu). You can see your alias by
using the online directory (http//www.uh.edu/dire
ctory). Make sure that it points to a valid
address! You can set this in PeopleSoft
(www.uh.edu/mypeoplesoft).
50
Approach Work Smart
  • Prioritize
  • Learn to control your time
  • Form a study group
  • Develop good study skills
  • Learn to use available resources
  • - your instructor
  • - student groups (IEEE, etc.)
  • - Campus and College resources
  • - your advisor

51
Your Advisor
  • Every student in ECE has an advisor the list is
    posted outside the ECE office (in the hall by the
    windows). The list is usually updated once per
    semester.
  • You should make an appointment to see your
    advisor every semester to discuss the classes you
    will be registering for. This is not required,
    but it is recommended.
  • Your advisor is there to answer questions and
    provide you with guidance.
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