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Georgia and the American Experience

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Georgia and the American Experience Chapter 6: An Age of Expansion, 1783-1838 Study Presentation – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Georgia and the American Experience


1
Georgia and the American Experience
  • Chapter 6
  • An Age of Expansion, 1783-1838
  • Study Presentation

2
Section 3 Economic Growth in Georgia
  • ESSENTIAL QUESTION
  • How did Georgia rebuild and expand its economy in
    the late 17th and early 18th century?

3
Section 3 Economic Growth in Georgia
  • What words do I need to know?
  • depression
  • turnpike
  • cotton gin
  • mechanical reaper

4
Cotton and the Cotton Gin
  • In 1793 Eli Whitney invented a machine for
    separating cotton seeds from its fiber, the
    cotton gin
  • Increased the amount cotton growers could process
    each day
  • The gin used wire teeth on a turning cylinder to
    separate the seed from fiber

5
The Mechanical Reaper
  • Cyrus McCormick invented a machine to cut grain
    in a field
  • Wooden paddles attached to a horses harness
    allowed six times more grain to be cut per day
    than previous methods
  • Georgia farmers could work larger and more
    profitable farms with these agricultural machines

6
Depression and the Panic of 1837
  • Many Georgia banks failed between 1837 and the
    early 1840s
  • Many businesses failed many farmers and planters
    lost their land
  • Many banks didnt have enough cash to pay out
    money their depositors had entrusted to them
    (people)

7
Early Roads in Georgia
  • Railroads, built after 1830, replaced horses,
    stagecoaches, and boats
  • Most GA roads ran east to west follow former
    Indian footpaths
  • Plank roads over wetlands that featured pikes
    or gates were called turnpikes
  • Travelers paid a toll, or fee at each pike the
    Old Federal Road connected Athens north to
    Tennessee

8
Terminus
  • Located at the southern end of a rail line that
    originated in Chattanooga, Tennessee
  • Later renamed Marthasville, after the daughter of
    former Governor Wilson Lumpkin
  • Marthasville became Atlanta, and the capital of
    GA
  • Railroads greatly reduced travel time for people
    and freight

Click to return to Table of Contents
9
Section 4 Georgia at the Dawn of a New Century
  • ESSENTIAL QUESTION
  • How did lifestyles differ in Georgia between
    frontier families and town dwellers?

10
Section 4 Georgia at the Dawn of a New Century
  • What words do I need to know?
  • pioneers
  • frontier Georgia
  • cultural refinements
  • townsfolk

11
Religious Activities
  • Methodist circuit riders (traveling ministers for
    frontier dwellers) grew in
  • GAs 1st Roman Catholic Church est. in Wilkes
    County in 1796
  • Savannah had Jewish synagogue
  • Churches become central to community life and
    education
  • African Methodist Episcopal (A.M.E.) churches
    were started by Richard Allen

12
Education in Georgia
  • The University of Georgia chartered in 1785 as
    nations first land-grant university opened for
    classes in 1801
  • UGA was often called Franklin College in its
    early days
  • By 1820, there were forty academies (schools)
    across the state
  • Georgia Female College (later Wesleyan College)
    opened in 1836

Click to return to Table of Contents
13
Section 5 The War of 1812
  • ESSENTIAL QUESTION
  • What were the causes of the War of 1812?

14
Section 5 The War of 1812
  • What words and people do I need to know?
  • embargo
  • president James Madison
  • war hawks
  • Treaty of Ghent

15
Causes of the War
  • Great Britain and France fighting so both
    countries to try to block U.S. trade with its
    enemy
  • British ships took American sailors and made them
    serve with the British Navy
  • President James Madison pushed Congress to
    declare war on Great Britain in 1812

16
War of 1812
  • War lasted for two years
  • In 1814, British attack and burn Washington
  • British later attacked Baltimore harbor The
    Star Spangled Banner written by Francis Scott
    during The Battle of Fort McHenry
  • The Battle of New Orleans, fought after the
    Treaty of Ghent ended the war, was a decisive
    American victory
  • The war united the American states as one nation
    Andrew Jackson became a national hero

Click to return to Table of Contents
17
Section 6 Native Americans in Georgia
  • ESSENTIAL QUESTION
  • Why were the Indians removed from Georgia?

18
Section 6 Native Americans in Georgia
  • What words do I need to know?
  • syllabary
  • Oconee War
  • Treaty of New York
  • Red Sticks
  • White Sticks
  • Treaty of Indian Springs
  • Trail of Tears

19
Cherokee Culture
  • Most advanced of Georgias tribes learned
    quickly from white settlers
  • Chief encouraged Christianity
  • Sequoyah developed a syllabary, a group of
    symbols that stand for whole syllables it gave
    Cherokees a written form of their language
  • Government modeled after United States capital
    at New Echota

20
Creek Indians
  • Series of clashes between Creek and settlers who
    pushed into their land known as Oconee War
  • Treaty of New York signed by Alexander
    McGillivray, Creeks give up all land east of the
    Oconee River, but could keep land on the west
    side
  • this angered Georgia settlers, who felt betrayed
    by their government
  • Land treaties were often broken
  • Red Stick Creeks endorsed war to fight for their
    land claims White Stick Creeks wanted peace

21
The Creek War
  • Red Sticks (mean) attacked Fort Mims, killing
    more than 400 people
  • The Battle of Horseshoe Bend, in Alabama, ended
    the Creek War in 1814 Andrew Jackson led the
    U.S. troops
  • The Creeks were forced to give up nearly all
    their land to the U.S. government
  • The Treaty of Indian Springs gave up last Creek
    lands in Georgia to the U.S.
  • Chief William McIntosh was later murdered by
    rival Creeks for signing the treaty

22
Creek Removal
  • Treaty of Washington (1832) resulted in 5 million
    acres of Creek land ceded to the United States
  • U.S. agreed to allow Creeks who wished to remain
    and live on 2 million of those acres the U.S.
    promised to protect those who stayed
  • Those who didnt wish to stay would have to move
    to the western territories
  • The treaty was broken by 1840, nearly all Creeks
    were forced to move west (Indian Removal Act)

23
The Trail of Tears
  • Discovery of gold in Dahlonega Georgia heightened
    demand for Cherokee land, whites who visited
    Cherokee land had to take an oath of allegiance.
  • The Supreme Court ruled that Cherokee territory
    was not subject to state law, but the ruling was
    not enforced by US Govt. (Worcester v. Georgia)
  • Between 1832 and 1835, Cherokees were stripped of
    their land
  • In 1838, thousands of Cherokees were forcibly
    removed to Oklahoma about 4,000 died from
    disease, exposure, or hunger
  • 700 to 800 escaped and hid in the North Carolina
    mountains

Click to return to Table of Contents
24
The Georgia Capital
  • Moved several times as population spread out
    throughout the frontier
  • Savannah (1733)
  • Augusta (1786)
  • Louisville (1796)
  • Milledgeville (1807)
  • Atlanta (1868)
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