Chapter 4 Rights and Responsibilities - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Chapter 4 Rights and Responsibilities PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 6c9b34-MjIzM



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Chapter 4 Rights and Responsibilities

Description:

Chapter 4 Rights and Responsibilities Section 1: The Bill of Rights Section 2: Guaranteeing Other Rights Section 3: Citizens Duties and Responsibilities – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:18
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 54
Provided by: MC98
Learn more at: http://www.mlbgsd.k12.pa.us
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Chapter 4 Rights and Responsibilities


1
Chapter 4 Rights and Responsibilities
  • Section 1 The Bill of Rights
  • Section 2 Guaranteeing Other Rights
  • Section 3 Citizens Duties and Responsibilities

2
Section 1 The Bill of Rights
  • The Main Idea
  • The freedoms spelled out in the Bill of
    Rightsthe freedoms of religion, speech, the
    press, and petition, and the right to a speedy
    and fair trialare essential to our democratic
    system.
  • Reading Focus
  • Why was the Bill of Rights added to the
    Constitution?
  • How does the First Amendment protect personal
    freedoms?
  • What other rights does the Bill of Rights
    guarantee?

3
The Bill of Rights
Section 1 The Bill of Rights
  • Americans wanted their rights written into the
    Constitution.
  • Several states recommended that a bill of rights
    be drafted upon ratification of the Constitution.
  • 1791The Bill of Rights became part of the
    Constitution.

4
The First Amendment protects personal freedoms.
Section 1 The Bill of Rights
  • Freedom of religion
  • Freedom of speech
  • Freedom of the press
  • Freedom of assembly
  • Freedom of petition

5
Freedom of Religion
  • Congress shall make no law respecting an
  • establishment of religion,
  • Separation of Church State- Division between
    government and religion

6
Freedom of Speech
  • Congress shall make no law . . . abridging
  • (limiting) the freedom of speech.
  • Can criticize government officials
  • Not an absolute freedom
  • Clear and present danger
  • The government can prevent an act of free speech
    if it is linked to an unlawful act

7
Freedom of the Press
Congress shall make no law . . . Abridging the
freedom . . . of the press.
  • The right to express ones ideas and opinions in
    writing
  • Press includes
  • Electronic Media
  • Books other written materials
  • TV Radio
  • Libel
  • Rumors that damage a persons reputationi
  • Lies that may harm another person
  • Americans do not have this right

8
Freedom of Assembly
  • Congress shall make no law . . . abridging . .
    .the right of the people peaceably to assemble.
  • Can attend public meetings

9
Freedom of Petition
  • Congress shall make no law . . . abridging. . .
    the right of the people . . . to petition the
    Government for a redress of grievances.
  • You have the right to ask the government to
    address your concerns.

10
freedoms of religion, speech, press, assembly,
and petition
People may not use freedom of speech to cause
panic
People may not write falsehoods that damage a
persons reputation (libel)
Assemblies must be peaceful.
11
Other rights guaranteed under the Bill of Rights
include
Section 1 The Bill of Rights
  • SecondRight to bear arms
  • FourthProtection from unreasonable search and
    seizure of private property
  • FifthRight to a fair trial and due process of
    law right to own property
  • SixthRight of the accused to a have a lawyer
  • EighthForbids cruel and unusual punishment
  • NinthStates that not all rights are listed in
    the Constitution

12
2nd Amendment- The Right to Bear Arms
  • To ensure that state militias would continue as
    an armed means of defense and to ensure that
    individual citizens had a right to own a firearm
  • In the 1790s big national armies were not trusted
    much of the Rev. War fighting had been done by
    the state militias. These same militias also
    defended against attacks from Indians.
  • Today, the language of the Second Amendment is
    frequently the source of heated debate.

13
Third Amendment
  • prohibits the quartering of soldiers without
    permission.
  • Why? British soldiers could enter homes and force
    colonists to quarter them, or to give them
    housing and food

14
Rights of the Accused (4th-8th)
  • protect citizens from abuses in the criminal
    justice system
  • establish codes of conduct for the police and the
    courts
  • Some of our most cherished legal protections

15
Fourth Amendment
  • protects citizens from unreasonable searches and
    seizures
  • In many cases, a search is considered reasonable
    only if a judge issues a warrant authorizing it.
  • A search warrant is a legal document that
    describes the place to be searched and the people
    or items to be seized
  • issued only if there is good reason to believe
    that evidence of a crime will be found
  • Under some circumstances, however, police
    officers are allowed to conduct searches without
    a warrant.
  • danger to public safety
  • Criminal activity is involved

16
(No Transcript)
17
right to bear arms
no forced quartering of troops
no unreasonable searches and seizures
A judge may issue a search warrant if there is
reason to believe that evidence of a crime may be
found
18
Fifth Amendment
  • Before a person can be tried for a serious crime
  • grand jury must indict-- formally accuse
  • decides if there is enough evidence to go to
    trial
  • protects an accused person from hasty government
    action
  • self-incrimination-- having to testify against
    oneself
  • Continued

19
Fifth Amendment Continued
  • double jeopardy-- being tried twice for the same
    crime
  • no person can be denied life, liberty, or
    property without due process of law
  • person cannot be punished for a crime until the
    law has been fairly applied
  • our government must act within the law

  • Continued.

20
Fifth Amendment Continued
  • nor shall private property be taken for public
    use, without just compensation.
  • the government cannot take private property
    without giving the owner fair payment for it
  • it does give the government the right of eminent
    domain, the power to take private property for
    public use
  • allows government officials to force property
    owners to sell their land to the government at
    what is determined to be a fair price

21
Sixth Amendment
  • provides that a person accused of a crime has the
    right to a prompt and public trial decided by a
    jury
  • People accused of a crime must be informed of the
    charges against them
  • The right to hear and question all witnesses
    against them, and to have their own witnesses
    testify as well
  • The right to an attorney

22
requires indictment, a grand jury, and due
process of law for accused person protects from
self-incrimination and double jeopardy
guarantees right to property
an accused person has a right to a prompt, public
trial, to be informed of charges, to hear and
question witnesses, and to have a lawyer
The government may take citizens prop- erty for
the public good and with just compensation.
23
Seventh Amendment
  • provides for a trial by jury in certain kinds of
    cases involving money or property

24
Eighth Amendment
  • To ensure that people accused of crimes appear
    for trial, judges can order them to pay bail
  • Bail is money or property that the accused gives
    the court to hold.
  • the person is released from jail
  • get the money back is to show up for trial.
  • the courts cannot set excessive bail.
  • forbids cruel and unusual punishment.

25
Rights of States and Citizens (9 10)
  • To ensure that Americans would enjoy other rights
    and freedoms not mentioned in the Bill of Rights
  • Ninth Amendment-- implies that Americans enjoy
    basic rights not listed in the Constitution.
  • Tenth Amendment deals with powers not
    specifically given to the federal government by
    the Constitution nor forbidden to the states by
    the Constitution
  • These powers belong either to the states or to
    the people

26
provides for a trial by jury in some cases
involving money or property
requires reasonable bail and forbids cruel and
unusual punishment
The people have other basic rights not listed in
the Constitution
All powers not expressly given to the federal
government nor forbidden to the states by the
Constitution are reserved for the states or the
people
27
Section 1
Question What rights are guaranteed by the Bill
of Rights?
The Bill of Rights The Bill of Rights
Separation of church and state The inclusion of rights not specifically listed in the Constitution
Freedom of the press Freedom of speech
Freedom of petition Freedom of assembly
No quartering of soldiers The right to bear arms
Protection for those accused Protection from unreasonable search and seizure
28
Section 2 Guaranteeing Other Rights
  • The Main Idea
  • Other amendments to the Constitution expanded the
    civil rights of Americans.
  • Reading Focus
  • How did the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Amendments
    extend civil rights?
  • Which amendments extended Americans voting
    rights?

29
Civil Rights
Section 2 Guaranteeing Other Rights
  • The Thirteenth Amendment outlawed slavery in the
    United States in1865.
  • The Fourteenth Amendment granted full citizenship
    to African Americans in 1868 and protected
    citizens against unfair actions by state
    governments.

30
Fourteenth Amendment
  • granted full citizenship to African Americans
  • declared that no state could take away a
    citizens life, liberty, or property, without
    due process of law.

31
civil rights
Fourteenth Amendment
Thirteenth Amendment
Civil War
32
Amendments Extend Voting Rights
  • Voting is one of the most basic principles of
    citizenship
  • the Constitution mentioned nothing about voting
    rights.
  • Between 1870 and 1971, a series of six
    constitutional amendments extended suffrage, the
    right to vote, to all U.S. citizens

33
Fifteenth Amendment
  • no one could be denied suffrage because of race
    or color
  • applied only to African American men
  • Many former Confederate states passed laws to
    keep African Americans from voting

34
Seventeenth Amendment
  • Under Article I, Section 3 of the Constitution,
    citizens of each state did not elect their
    senators. Instead, each states legislature
    elected that states senators
  • direct election of senators
  • senators answerable to the voters and not to
    other politicians.

35
Nineteenth Amendment
  • gave all women the right to vote
  • Susan B. Anthony, Carrie Chapman Catt, Lucretia
    Mott, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton led the womens
    suffrage movement

36
Voting Rights
Section 2 Guaranteeing Other Rights
  • 1870 The Fifteenth Amendment guaranteed the
    right to vote to African American men.
  • 1913 The Seventeenth Amendment gave voters
    power to elect their senators.
  • 1920 The Nineteenth Amendment granted suffrage
    to women.

37
Voting Rights (continued)
Section 2 Guaranteeing Other Rights
  • 1961 The Twenty-third Amendment gave citizens
    of Washington, D.C., the right to vote for
    president and vice president.
  • 1964 The Twenty-fourth Amendment forbade poll
    taxes.
  • 1971 The Twenty-sixth Amendment lowered the
    voting age to 18.

38
Section 2
Question Which amendments extended Americans
voting rights?
39
Fifteenth Amendment
Seventeenth Amendment
suffrage
president and vice president
poll tax
Twenty-sixth Amendment
Lucretia Mott Elizabeth Cady Stanton Susan B.
Anthony Carrie Chapman Catt
40
Section 3 Citizens Duties and Responsibilities
  • The Main Idea
  • Along with the rights and freedoms of U.S.
    citizenship come important duties and
    responsibilities.
  • Reading Focus
  • What are the duties of citizenship?
  • What are the responsibilities of citizenship?

41
Duties of citizenship
Section 3 Citizens Duties and Responsibilities
  • Obeying the law
  • Attending school
  • Paying taxes
  • Serving in the armed forces
  • Appearing in court

42
Obeying the Law
  • It is your duty to know the Laws

Attending School
  • Mandatory until age 16
  • Educated Citizens

43
Paying Taxes
  • Income, sales, property, and more taxes
  • Taxes provide money to the government in turn the
    government
  • operates
  • Provides services
  • National security and defense

44
Serving in the Armed Forces
  • Volunteers
  • When the country has needed huge numbers of
    soldiers, it sometimes has had to establish a
    draft.
  • Draft laws (conscription) require men of certain
    ages and qualifications to serve in the military
  • 18yr old men must register with the selective
    service
  • Americans not fighting still participate
  • Food and goods are rationed (limited by law) at
    times
  • Pick up the slack at home

45
Appearing in Court
  • Citizens must report to serve as members of a
    jury (Jury Duty)
  • Citizens must also testify in court if called as
    a witness.

46
Guided Reading Questions
C
D
B
47
Responsibilities of Citizenship
Section 3 Citizens Duties and Responsibilities
  • Voting
  • Being informed
  • Taking part in government
  • Helping your community
  • Respecting and protecting others rights

48
Voting
  • Our government is based on the consent of the
    governed.
  • If you do not vote, you leave the decision to
    others
  • Let your legislators know when we approve or
    disapprove of their actions

49
Being Informed
  • Be informed of candidates, current events, and
    key issues.

Taking Part in Government
  • Political Parties
  • Be a leader
  • Educate others
  • Run for office

50
Helping Your Community
  • Volunteer

Respecting Protecting Others Rights
  • Know your own rights
  • Help protect the rights of others

51
Section 3
Question What are the responsibilities of
citizenship?
voting
respecting others rights
being informed
helping the community
taking part in government
52
A
B
A
A
B
53
Chapter 4 Wrap-Up
1. Which amendments focus on the rights of people
accused of crimes? What rights do these
amendments guarantee? 2. Why was the Ninth
Amendment included in the Bill of Rights? 3. How
did the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Amendments
extend the civil rights of Americans? 4. How have
voting rights been expanded through
constitutional amendments? 5. What are the duties
of citizenship? 6. What are the responsibilities
of citizenship?
About PowerShow.com