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THE ROAD TO REVOLUTION -1763-1778

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THE ROAD TO REVOLUTION -1763-1778 Chapter 7 THE DEEP ROOTS OF REVOLUTION American Revolution was a revolution in thought and perception about who the colonists were. – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: THE ROAD TO REVOLUTION -1763-1778


1
THE ROAD TO REVOLUTION -1763-1778
  • Chapter 7

2
THE DEEP ROOTS OF REVOLUTION
  • American Revolution was a revolution in thought
    and perception about who the colonists were.
  • Reasons?

3
THE MERCANTILE THEORY
  • Policy of all major European nations from 16th to
    l8th centuries.
  • Mercantilism Belief that wealth was power and
    that a countrys economic wealth (both military
    and political power) could be measured by the
    amount of gold or silver in its treasury.

4
MercantilismElements of the Theory
  • To get gold, must export more than import
  • Colonies provide export markets
  • Colonies provide source for raw material
  • Colonies cant trade with others
  • Colonies cant produce their own finished goods
  • Encourage colonies to produce what mother country
    must import

5
Mercantilism Trammels On Trade
  • Parliament passed many laws to enforce the
    mercantile system
  • Navigation Laws most famous
  • Significance

6
The Money Problem
  • All currency came from outside.
  • Had to use British, French and Spanish Coins
  • Colonists buying more than could sell under
    Mercantile policies, so chronic shortage of hard
    currency

7
The Money Problem
  • What did colonists use for currency besides
    coins?
  • Barter
  • On the eve of revolution, colonies issue paper
    money of dubious value
  • Why value dubious?
  • Parliament eventually bans, which is one more
    grievance of colonists

8
Merits of Mercantilism
  • Salutary Neglect.
  • Smuggling.
  • Americans did reap many direct benefits from
    Mercantilism.
  • What were they?

9
Benefits of Mercantilism
  • Price supports and subsidies helped them compete
    against the Europeans.
  • Tobacco monopoly.
  • They had rights of Englishmen and opportunities
    for self-government.
  • Protection of the strong British army and Navy
  • Prosperity trickled down

10
The Menace Of Mercantilism
  • Downside to Mercantilism
  • It hurt economic initiative
  • Southern planters were treated more favorably.
  • Cash Crop farmers forced into debt
  • Mercantilism was humiliating to Americans

11
The Stamp Tax Uproar
  • After the war, Brits wanted to start taxing the
    American Colonies.
  • Why?
  • For what Purpose?
  • George Grenville ordered End of Salutary Neglect.
  • Revenue Acts

12
New Mercantilist Laws
  • Sugar Act1764
  • Quartering Act of 1765
  • Stamp Act 1765
  • This Act became the most hated

13
Stamp Act
  • What it required
  • Who it antagonized
  • British view of its fairness
  • American view of its fairness
  • No taxation without representation
  • Virtual representation

14
Parliament Forced To Repeal The Stamp Act
  • Stamp Act Congress of 1765
  • Non-importation agreements of British goods
  • Sons of Liberty and Daughters of Liberty
  • Declaratory Act

Tarring and Feathering a Tax Stamp Agent
15
The Townshend Tea Tax And The Boston Massacre
  • Charles Champagne Charlie Townsend emerges as
    PM
  • In 1767 he persuades Parliament to pass the
    Townshend Acts
  • Colonists object
  • 1768 British officials landed 2 regiments of
    troops (700) in Boston

16
Boston Massacre
17
The Seditious Committees Of Correspondence
  • Townshend Acts were a failure
  • In 1770 Townshend Acts repealed. But the tax on
    tea remained
  • Sam Adams, master propagandist
  • Organized the local Committees of Correspondence
    in Mass
  • Led to Inter-colonial committees of
    correspondence

Sam Adams
18
Boston Tea Party
  • 1773 the British East India Company had a big
    problem
  • What was it?
  • How did Parliament try to remedy it?
  • Why was Parliament so motivated to fix the
    problem?

19
Tea Act 1773
  • Britain gave BEIC a complete monopoly on the
    American tea business.
  • Consequences
  • Able to sell tea more cheaply than the smuggled
    tea, even with the tax.
  • Cuts out the American middle-man
  • Angers colonists. Americans see as a trick to
    make the tax palatable.

20
Boston Tea Party
  • None of the tea cargo of the Company reached its
    destination.
  • Annapolis colonists burned cargo and the ships.
  • CharlestonGovernor stores in a warehouse. Is
    eventually sold during the war to pay for
    uniforms.
  • Boston band of white townspeople dressed as
    Indians boarded the 3 tea ships on Dec. 6, 1773.
    They smashed 342 chests and dumped the tea into
    Boston harbor. Boston Tea party

21
Boston Tea Party
22
Response to Boston Tea Party
  • Reactions of public
  • Reaction of Parliament
  • Intolerable Acts
  • Boston Port Act
  • Mass. Government Act
  • Quartering Act
  • Admin. of Justice Act

23
Quebec Act - 1774
  • Not part of the Intolerable Acts. But passed at
    the same time.
  • What did it say?
  • Colonists believed it was intolerable and
    designed to punish them.
  • Why?

24
Quebec Before and After 1774
25
The Continental Congress And Bloodshed
  • 1774--In response to the Intolerable Acts
    colonists call First Continental Congress
  • Met in Philadelphia to discus ways of redressing
    colonial grievances.
  • 12 of 13 colonies sent 55 men
  • Drew up a Declaration of Rights

26
The Continental Congress And Bloodshed
  • Continental Congress helped create the
    Association.
  • Attempt to get Brits to repeal the Intolerable
    Acts and taxes.
  • What was it?
  • Called for a complete boycott of British goods.
    non-import, non-export and non-consumption.
  • Was a move toward unity.

27
Lexington and Concord
  • Sam Adams
  • John Hancock
  • Paul Revere
  • Shot Heard Round the World

28
Lexington
29
Strengths and Weaknesses
  • British Strengths
  • British Weaknesses
  • American Strengths
  • American Weaknesses

30
A THIN LINE OF HEROES
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