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Controlling Food Costs during Production

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Controlling Food Costs during Production 7 OH 7-* – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Controlling Food Costs during Production


1
Controlling Food Costs during Production
7
OH 7-1
2
  • Learning Objectives
  • After completing this chapter, you should be able
    to

Describe the tools managers use to estimate
food-production levels.
Explain how managers monitor food quality.
Detail how managers monitor the food-production
process.
Detail how managers monitor the
beverage-production process.
Explain how managers monitor beverage quality.
3
Estimating Food-Production Levels
Developing Sales Forecasts
4
Determining Quantity to Produce
  • Accurate food production schedules are important
    because
  • Overproduction causes excessive leftovers and
    waste.
  • Underproduction causes production shortages and
    unhappy customers.
  • Both situations reduce profits!

5
Determining Quantity to Produce continued
  • To maximize guest satisfaction, managers help
    their production staff know how much to prepare
    on the proper day and at the proper time.

6
To Ensure Proper Production
  • Professional managers always use food production
    charts!

7
Food Production Charts
  • Created by studying past sales (sales histories)
  • Generally, the best predictor of what guests will
    buy in the future is what they purchased in the
    past.
  • Created based upon managements estimate of
    future sales
  • If we know the percent of customers that have
    previously purchased an item, we can apply that
    to the new estimated customers and arrive at the
    amount to forecast.

8
When Using Production Charts
  • Prepare an estimate of the number of guests to be
    served.
  • Indicate the actual number of items to be
    produced.
  • Post the production chart where it can be seen
    easily.

9
When Using Production Charts continued
  • Ensure the required standardized recipes are
    readily available.
  • Periodically check the actual recipe yield
    against that listed on the standardized recipe.

10
Recipe Yields
  • Recipe yields must be known.
  • Accurate costing of menu items is not possible
    without known and consistent yields from
    standardized recipes.
  • Effective production planning is also impossible
    without known recipe yields.

11
Recipe Yields continued
  • To calculate a recipe yield, compute the total
    volume of the recipe by
  • Weightfor those recipes where portion size is
    determined by weight.
  • Volumefor those recipes where portion size is
    determined by volume.

12
Calculating Recipe Yield
  • Weigh or measure only the major ingredients.
  • Account for cooking loss, especially for
  • Meats
  • Vegetables
  • Fruit

13
Recipe Conversions
  • Standardized recipes will need to be adjusted or
    scaled based on the revised forecasts.
  • Step 1 Compute the conversion factor.

Desired yield Current recipe yield Conversion factor
14
Recipe Conversions continued
  • Step 1 Example
  • Current yield, fifty portions
  • Desired yield, forty portions

Desired yield Current recipe yield Conversion factor
40 50 40 50 40 50 0.80
15
Recipe Conversions continued
  • Step 2 Convert ingredients into units that can
    be easily multiplied or divided.
  • Convert weights to ounces.
  • Convert cups, pints, and quarts to fluid ounces.

16
Recipe Conversions continued
  • Step 3 Multiply each ingredient by the
    conversion factor.
  • Example

96 oz x 0.80 76.8 oz
17
Recipe Conversions continued
  • Step 4 Convert ingredient amounts back to
    normally used units.
  • Example

76.8 oz 8 oz 9.6 c or 2 qt, 1½ c
18
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19
Monitoring Standards
  • Tasting foods regularly is one way to ensure
    standards are met. The use of standardized
    recipes is another.

20
Food That Does Not Meet the Restaurants
Standards
  • Should not be served
  • Should be salvaged (all or part), if possible
  • Should be discarded if not salvageable
  • Increase costs
  • Reduce profits

21
Questions to Ask When Food Fails to Meet
Standards
  • Is the recipe clearly written?
  • Did the cook understand the recipe?

22
Questions to Ask When Food Fails to Meet
Standards continued
  • Are ingredients used in the recipe clearly
    labeled?
  • Are the appropriate ingredients in the proper
    containers? (Do ingredients in containers match
    the containers labels?)

OH 7-6
23
How Would You Answer the Following Questions?
  • It (is/is not) possible for a cook using a
    standardized recipe to create a substandard menu
    item.
  • Waste reports indicate when employees overportion
    and waste food. (True/False)
  • How many steps does the recipe conversion process
    have?
  • Three
  • Four
  • Five
  • Six
  • A recipe (yield/portion conversion) test is a
    calculation of the number of portions produced by
    a standardized recipe.

24
Other controls in food production
  • Adequate training
  • Prep and pull lists
  • Diagrams for line set up
  • Cooking and Holding temperature logs
  • Carry over production

25
Example prep list
26
Monitoring Beverage Production
Maintaining Beverage Quality Standards
Maintaining Beverage Cost Controls
27
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28
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29
Key Terms
Bakers percentage A formula in which the weight
of the flour equals 100 percent and all the other
ingredients are calculated in proportion to the
weight of the flour.
Carry-over production Food that has been
previously produced but not served to customers.
Conversion factor When converting recipes, a
multiplier used to adjust the quantity of
ingredients on the existing recipe to the
quantity needed to produce the desired yield.
Food-production chart A chart that provides the
essential information a staff needs to know on
exactly what and how much food to prepare.
Popularity index The percentage share of a given
menu item in its respective category (e.g.,
entrée), derived by dividing the number of
portions sold by the total number of items in the
same category that were sold.
Pour cost percentage The proportion of beverage
cost to sales price.
30
Key Terms continued
Quality-control line check A system for ensuring
product freshness and sufficient quantities,
encompassing taste tests and checking standards.
Recipe conversion A method used to change the
yield of a recipe from its original yield to a
desired yield.
Recipe yield The number of portions a
standardized recipe produces.
Taste test Tasting done by staff prior to the
start of a meal period to determine if products
meet the establishments standards.
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