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District Annual Report 2013-2014

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Title: District Annual Report 2013-2014


1
District Annual Report 2013-2014
Donnie W. Evans, Ed.D. New Jersey State Board of
Education January 7, 2015
2
Objectives
  • Provide contexts for our work in PPS
  • Challenges and obstacles
  • Bright Futures Vision, Mission, Goals
    Objectives
  • Review initiatives and strategies for
    transforming the district
  • Review process academic outcomes (past
    present)
  • Review Next Steps

2
3
School Board
  • Christopher Irving, President
  • Chrystal Cleaves, Vice President
  • Wendy Guzman
  • Jonathan Hodges, MD
  • Errol S. Kerr
  • Manny Martinez
  • Kenneth Simmons
  • Corey Teague
  • Flavio Rivera

3
4
The District
  • Total Students 28,167
  • Pre-K-12 25,256
  • Pre-K (Private Providers) 2,911
  • Special Education 3,355
  • LEP 3,764
  • Free/Reduced Lunch 92
  • Instructional Staff 2,947
  • Total Staff (including subs) 5,369
  • Total Schools 54
  • Does not include Adult High students

4
5
Bright Futures Core Beliefs
  • The core business of schools and the school
    district is teaching and learning which drives
    all decisions and activities in the district.
  • All children can achieve at high levels and it is
    the responsibility of educators to create
    environments where student learning can occur.
  • Effective instruction makes the most difference
    in student achievement.
  • All staff must be committed to children first
    and to the pursuit of high student achievement.
  • All schools must be safe, caring and orderly to
    enable teachers to teach and students to learn.
  • Only through collaboration with and engagement of
    community organizations, institutions, agencies,
    and families can the district realize its vision
    and mission.

5
6
Historical Challenges Practices
  • Student academic outcomes
  • NJASK
  • HSPA
  • SAT ACT
  • Graduation Rate
  • Drop-out Rate
  • College Admission
  • Completion
  • Attendance Rates

6
7
Historical Challenges Practices
  • School/District Culture Low Expectations
  • Family Engagement
  • Facilities
  • Fiscal Management
  • Internal External
  • Communications
  • Social Promotion
  • Instructional Leadership Capacity

7
8
Theres a quiet revolution going on in Paterson
Public Schools, and its aim is to teach children
that communities are made by people who show up
The Star Ledger Editorial 10/13/14
9
Strategic Plan 2009-2014
  • Bright Futures
  • A Strategic Plan for the Children of Paterson

9
10
Bright Futures
  • Vision
  • To be a leader in educating New Jerseys urban
    youth
  • Mission
  • To prepare each student to be successful in the
    institution of higher education of their choosing
    and in their chosen career

10
11
Bright Futures District Priorities
11
12
Bright Futures District Goals
- Work in progress areas
12
13
New Jerseys NCLB Waiver Priority Focus Schools
Focus Schools School 2 School 18 School
3 School 20 School 5 School 21 School 8 School
24 School 11 School 25 School 12 School 26 Dr.
Martin Luther King New Roberto Clemente EHS-
Information Technology EHS-Cul. Arts, Hospitality
Tour. EHS- Gov. and Public Admin. Academy High
Schools
Priority Schools School 10 (SIG) School
13 School 15 School 28 School 6 Rev. Dr. Frank
Napier Jr. School (SIG)
13
14
Accomplishments 2009-2013
  • Restructured and re-staffed comprehensive high
    schools into small autonomous thematic schools
  • Eastside Culinary Arts, Hospitality Tourism
  • Eastside Information Technology
  • Eastside Government and Public Administration
  • JFK Architecture Construction Trades
  • JFK Education and Training
  • JFK Business, Technology, Marketing Finance
  • JFK Science, Technology, Engineering, Math
  • Converted all high schools
  • to schools of choice
  • Expanded Alternative High
  • School Capacity

14
15
Accomplishments 2009-2013
  • Restructured re-staffed lowest performing
    elementary schools
  • School 4-Rev. Dr. Frank Napier, Jr. (SIG)
  • School 6
  • School 10 (SIG)
  • Created three full service community schools
    (Schools 4, 5, New Roberto Clemente)
  • Created first curriculum-based, student operated
    credit union
  • Implemented the Paterson Effective Schools Model
    to establish healthy school cultures
  • Initiated pre-K through grade 3 literacy
    initiative
  • Ended Social Promotion

16
Accomplishments 2009-2013
  • Auditors Management Report (AMR) for 2012-2013
    indicates no repeat findings and no findings
    that rose to the level of reporting under
    government auditing standards. Nor did we have
    any or significant deficiencies in internal
    controls
  • Completed Process re-design of operational and
    instructional processes and procedures and
    realized 2 million annual savings
  • Finance Human Resources
  • Academic Services Assessment
  • Student Registration Student Information
    Services
  • Facilities Benefits

17
Accomplishments 2009-2013
  • Acquired grant funding to support school
    improvement
  • Promise Community Grant to support Full Service
    Community Schools - 2.3 million
  • Affordable Care Act Grant
  • for school-based
  • Health Centers in full service
  • schools - 500,000
  • Talent 21 grant to support
  • technology initiatives - 2.2 million
  • School Improvement Grants (SIG)
  • for School 4 10 - 12 million
  • (2 million annually per school)

17
18
Transformation Objectives 2013-2014
  • These objectives continue to drive our work
  • Build healthy school cultures climates
  • Efficient responsive district operations
  • Revise teacher administrator evaluation systems
  • Implement Common Core State Standards
  • Implement high impact academic interventions for
    low performing students
  • Strengthen the districts assessment system
  • Build capacity among staff
  • Teachers
  • Principals vice-principals
  • District administrators supervisors

18
19
District Transformation Initiatives 2013-2014
Comprehensive Assessment System Common Core Healthy School Culture Capacity Building Teacher/ Principal Evaluation High Impact Interventions Efficient Operations
Star Math ELA Univ. of Pittsburgh IFL Paterson Effective Schools Model Univ. of Pittsburgh IFL Focal Point Innovation Zone Cliff Planning
PARCC Model Curriculum Principals Autonomy Pre K-3 Literacy Initiative Leadership Institute Regional Achievement Center Five-year Facilities Plan
Elementary School Choice School District Restructuring Re-staffing End Social Promotion Strategic Plan Development (2014-2019)
Special Education Restructuring Attendance Initiative
ELL Restructuring Graduation Enhancement
NJPBSIS
19
20
Accomplishments 2013-2014
  • Awarded local control of the operations
    district performance review (DPR) area as a
    result of sustained high performance in this
    area.
  • The New Jersey School Development Authority (SDA)
    has commenced with construction of two new
    elementary schools School 16 and Hazel Marshall
    Elementary School. Approval for a third new
    elementary school is likely in the near future.
  • Restructured elementary schools
  • Opened Gifted Talented Academy (at School 28)
  • Opened Newcomers School for non-English speaking
    students entering the district (School 11)
  • Established New Roberto Clemente and Don Bosco as
    middle schools
  • Restructured School 15 from K-8 to a pre-K-5
    elementary school
  • Expanded in-district pre-K program
  • PARCC Field test participant

20
21
Accomplishments 2013-2014
  • Successfully negotiated a new contractual
    agreement with the Paterson Education Association
    that features
  • Compensation for the previous four years
  • Increased longevity pay for applicable PEA
    members
  • A new single Salary Guide Option for teachers
  • A pay for performance provision
  • teachers rated highly effective can move up two
    steps on the appropriate salary guide, thus
    accelerating reaching maximum steps
  • teachers rated effective can move up one step on
    the appropriate salary guide
  • Teachers rated ineffective or partially effective
    receive no step increases and must improve to
    retain their positions
  • Additional compensation for teachers who
    volunteer and are selected to teach in a district
    Turn-Around School
  • Incentives for teachers joining the district to
    fill hard to fill positions in critical
    shortage subject areas.

22
Accomplishments 2013-2014
  • The district implemented its new teacher and
    principal evaluation systems (Focal Point Model).
  • One outcome is that currently more than 10 of
    district teachers have been placed on corrective
    action plans because of their classroom
    performance.
  • Individual contracts or agreements for senior
    staff (Assistant Superintendents and Division
    Chiefs) and other non-represented administrators
    will include pay for performance provisions
    beginning the 2015-2016 school year.

23
Accomplishments 2013-2014
  • Auditors Management Report (AMR) for 2013-14
    indicates no repeat findings and no findings
    that rose to the level of reporting under
    government auditing standards. Nor did we have
    any or significant deficiencies in internal
    controls
  • The district has taken strong first steps to
    avoid a fiscal cliff in future years including,
    but not limited to
  • Budget freezes
  • Reduction in district-level staff
  • A reduction in district-level non-salary
    administrative costs
  • A reduction in teaching positions
  • A reduction of principals or vice principals on
    special assignment

24
Accomplishments 2013-2014
  • Acquired grant funding to support district
    initiatives
  • School Improvement Grants for School 6 New
    Roberto Clemente 12 million (2 million
    annually per school)
  • 21st Century Community Learning Centers Program
    (2012-2017) - 2,647,900
  • Race-to-the-Top Phase 3 (RTTT3) to support the
    implementation of the revised Principal and
    Teacher Evaluation System - 1,271,064
  • School Based Health Centers for School 6 School
    15 - 500,000
  • Lowes Community Improvement Grant for School 4 -
    100,000
  • Excellent Educators for New Jersey (EE4NJ) Pilot
    Program Principal Effectiveness Evaluation System
    - 50,000
  • Optimum Lightpath Grant for PANTHER academy to
    purchase equipment for a digital astronomy
    laboratory- 10,000
  • Other

24
25
Academic Outcomes 2013-2014
25
26
Assessment Transition Timeline Are your
assessments transitioning?
Transitional Assessments
Source NJDOE
27
2013 and 2014 State Assessment Grades 3-11 Total
Students Two Year Comparison Language Arts
Literacy
28
2013 and 2014 State Assessment Grades 3-11 Total
Students Two Year Comparison Mathematics
29
HSPA 2004-2014 Language Arts and Mathematics
Proficient and Above
Language Arts Literacy 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
TOTAL 54.7 53.8 52.6 56.3 49.3 49.7 51.7 59.5 66.4 71.8 74.6
GENERAL ED. 70.6 70.4 69.3 74.0 65.7 72.3 69.9 76.0 80. 88.6 91.4
SPECIAL ED. 6.1 9.1 7.3 9.3 8.3 9.7 15.6 23.8 37.0 32.6 39.9
LMTD. ENG. PROF. 11.0 8.1 11.0 11.6 9.0 13.2 22.1 22.7 30.0 23.9 40.2

MATHEMATICS 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
TOTAL 40.4 47.2 45.5 39.7 34.2 31.9 33.0 30.9 46.6 49.7 43.2
GENERAL ED. 50.0 58.7 57.6 52.4 46.0 47.3 45.1 41.2 58.1 60.7 53.7
SPECIAL ED. 9.1 6.8 4.5 1.5 1.9 2.9 7.3 4.7 13.9 12.1 9.4
LMTD. ENG. PROF. 20.3 26.7 25.4 16.1 13.9 8.2 15.1 8.6 27.4 30.4 31.1

29
30
100 grad rate at Art High Herald News -
12/4/14
31
High School Renewal Results
31
32
Graduation Rate
Graduation Rate Graduation Rate Graduation Rate Graduation Rate Graduation Rate Graduation Rate Graduation Rate
Year 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
 Percentage 45.6 50.4  64.0 66.4 71.9 74.2
Gains (/-) 4.8
13.6 2.4 5.5
2.3
32
33
High School Renewal Results
  • Total College Acceptances
  • 2011 1205
  • 2012 1508
  • 2013 - 1901
  • 2014 - 1682
  • Two-year College
  • 2011 430 students
  • 2012 598 students
  • 2013 595 students
  • 2014 - 598 students
  • Four-year College
  • 2011 243 students
  • 2012 287 students
  • 2013 318 students
  • 2014 - 379 students

Students received acceptances to one or more
colleges/ universities
33
34
2013 and 2014 New Jersey Biology Competency Test
(NJBCT) District Proficient Above
35
SAT
The highest achievable score on the SAT is 2400
total (a score of 800 in each area, Critical
Reading, Writing, and Mathematics). The table
below details the mean scores for Paterson as
compared to the state of New Jersey.  
Mean Score PATERSON 2012 PATERSON 2013 PATERSON 2014 /- STATE 2012 STATE 2013 STATE 2014 /-
Critical Reading 365 365 368 3 495 499 501 2
Mathematics 389 389 392 3 517 522 523 1
Writing 365 366 360 -6 499 500 502 2
36
2013 and 2014 SAT Examination
37
Paterson school district sees increase in
perfect NJ ASK scores NorthJersey.com
38
2010-2014 NJASK 3-5 District Aggregate Total
Students - Language Arts
39
2010-2014 NJASK 6-8 District Aggregate Total
Students - Language Arts
40
2010-2014 NJASK 3-8 District Aggregate Total
Students - Language Arts
41
2010-2014 NJASK 3-5 District Aggregate Total
Students - Mathematics
42
2010-2014 NJASK 6-8 District Aggregate Total
Students - Mathematics
43
2010-2014 NJASK 3-8 District Aggregate Total
Students - Mathematics
44
NJASK District-wide
  2011 2012 2013 2014  
  Language Arts Literacy Language Arts Literacy Language Arts Literacy Language Arts Literacy  
Grade Proficient Above Proficient Above Proficient Above Proficient Above /-
3 33.1 37.2 40.4 36.7 -3.7
4 33.2 33.8 28.9 31.5 2.6
5 25.9 34.2 34.7 29.5 -5.2
6 36.9 33.5 39.3 39.1 -0.2
7 30.7 31.1 35.2 38.0 2.8
8 53.7 58.7 61.6 54.4 -7.2
  Mathematics Mathematics Mathematics Mathematics  
Grade Proficient Above Proficient Above Proficient Above Proficient Above /-
3 54.8 59.5 57.2 59.5 2.3
4 55.7 53.5 58.2 56.0 -2.2
5 55.8 60.6 57.6 61.5 3.9
6 51.0 55.0 56.7 57.2 0.5
7 36.2 36.9 36.6 39.3 2.7
8 40.8 40.0 45.7 45.9 0.2
Special Note The increase/decrease (/-) column
will be one tenth of a percent off due to
rounding and calculations.
44
45
2013 and 2014 NJASK Performance By Demographic
Group District Grade 4
Science 2013 2013 2013 2013 2014 2014 2014 2014
Demographic Group Enrolled Valid Scale Scores Proficient Advanced Proficient Proficient Advanced Proficient Enrolled Valid Scale Scores Proficient Advanced Proficient Proficient Advanced Proficient
Total Students 1,996 1,972 1408 71.4 1,905 1,869 1321 70.7
General Education 1,393 1,392 1114 80.0 1,388 1,382 1095 79.2
Special Education 303 280 139 49.7 265 238 116 48.8
Limited English Proficient 450 448 267 59.6 446 440 250 56.8
Current LEP 324 322 168 52.2 283 278 120 43.2
Former LEP 126 126 99 78.6 163 162 130 80.2
Female 920 911 677 74.3 949 933 679 72.7
Male 1076 1061 731 68.9 956 936 642 68.6
White 105 105 82 78.0 105 102 79 77.5
Black or African American 519 512 358 69.9 463 449 284 63.3
Asian 96 95 80 84.2 107 106 90 84.9
Hispanic or Latino 1,273 1,257 885 70.4 1,225 1,207 866 71.7
46
2013 and 2014 NJASK Performance By Demographic
Group District Grade 8
Science 2013 2013 2013 2013 2014 2014 2014 2014
Demographic Group Enrolled Valid Scale Scores Proficient Advanced Proficient Proficient Advanced Proficient Enrolled Valid Scale Scores Proficient Advanced Proficient Proficient Advanced Proficient
Total Students 1,999 1,973 1006 51.0 2,005 1,963 997 50.8
General Education 1,379 1,376 896 65.2 1,338 1,332 879 66.0
Special Education 360 339 67 19.8 382 347 54 15.6
Limited English Proficient 295 292 53 18.1 343 341 86 25.2
Current LEP 277 274 44 16.1 302 301 64 21.3
Former LEP 18 18 9 50.0 41 40 22 55.0
Female 955 945 445 47.1 965 949 466 49.1
Male 1044 1028 561 54.5 1,040 1,014 531 52.4
White 86 85 60 70.6 93 90 60 66.7
Black or African American 541 534 223 41.7 501 483 231 47.9
Asian 110 108 59 54.6 110 110 72 65.5
Hispanic or Latino 1,259 1,243 663 53.3 1,293 1,272 633 49.8
47
Next Steps for 2014-15
47
48
The Strategic Plan - Brighter Futures-
  • Vision
  • To be the leader in educating New Jerseys urban
    youth
  • Mission
  • To prepare each student for success in the
    college/university of their choosing and in their
    chosen career

48
49
District Priorities and Goals
  • Effective Academic Programs Programs are
    research based and outcomes driven
  • Creating and Maintaining Healthy School Cultures
    Schools are safe to enable teachers to teach and
    students to learn
  • Family and Community Engagement District and
    school staff collaborate with and engage families
    and community institutions, organizations, and
    agencies
  • Efficient and Responsive Operations Operations
    supports the district and schools core business
    (teaching and learning) and is responsive to the
    needs of staff, students, and community

49
50
Brighter Futures District Goals
50
51
District Transformation Initiatives 2014-2015
Comprehensive Assessment System Common Core Healthy School Culture Capacity Building Teacher/ Principal Evaluation High Impact Interventions Efficient Responsive Operations
Star Math ELA Instructional Model Effective Schools Univ. of Pittsburgh IFL Achieve NJ Breakfast After the Bell Cliff Planning
PARCC DOE Model Curriculum NJPBSIS Pre K-3 Literacy Initiative Leadership Institute RAC Five-year Facilities Plan
Unit Assessments Arts Initiative Elementary School Choice Urban Schools Human Capital Academy End Social Promotion Strategic Planning
CTE Initiative Family Community Engagement Reformation Strategic Data Project Attendance Initiative Technology Initiative
Special Education Restructuring Graduation Enhancement Transportation Restructuring
Guidance Restructuring Facilities Restructuring
ELL Restructuring
51
52
Next Steps for Elementary Schools
  • Expand School Choice Priority II/Goal 3
  • Add magnet schools (academic career-focused)
  • Prepare for two new schools expected to open fall
    2016
  • Expand Early Childhood HOPEVI Alexander
    Community Development
  • Complete the restructuring
  • of ELL/bilingual programs
  • More high impact interventions
  • for low performing students to
  • improve academic performance
  • Extended day and year
  • Paterson Reads
  • Writers workshop
  • Coaching teachers principals

52
53
Elementary School Choice Student Assignment
Options
  • Student assignment options include
  • Zoned neighborhood schools
  • Magnet schools
  • Controlled choice schools
  • Elementary students will have the option of
    attending their zoned neighborhood school, apply
    to attend a district magnet school or apply to
    attend a traditional district elementary school
    outside their neighborhood.

53
54
Districtwide Magnet Programs
  • Added to the array of existing magnets will be
    six to eight additional theme-based magnet
    schools including
  • Fine and Performing Arts
  • Mathematics and Science
  • Literacy
  • Technology
  • Dual Language
  • Single Gender
  • Environmental Studies
  • Other

54
55
Next Steps for High Schools
  • Deepen the breath of thematic curriculum
  • Expand advisories at each academy
  • Rewrite curriculum for all high school courses
  • International Baccalaureate/planning for diploma
    program
  • Expand SAT prep offerings
  • Extended Learning School for Dropouts
  • Expand Community Based Instruction (CBI)
    opportunities for special education students

55
56
Next Steps Districtwide
  • Continue preparation for PARCC
  • Complete restructuring of guidance services
  • Continue capacity building at every level
  • Increase parent involvement
  • Address attendance challenges for chronically
    absent children
  • Explore new, and further develop existing
    relationships with business, community and
    university partners in efforts to secure third
    party grant funding (private, State and Federal)

56
57
We can, whenever and wherever we choose,
successfully teach all children whose schooling
is of interest to us. We already know more than
we need to do that. Whether or not we do it must
finally depend on how we feel about the fact that
we haven't so far. Ronald Edmonds
57
58
Questions
For more information, contact Dr. Donnie Evans
devans_at_paterson.k12.nj.us Ms. Eileen Shafer
eshafer_at_paterson.k12.nj.us
58
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