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Theory Presenters Training Course

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Title: PowerPoint Presentation Author: JPOWELL Last modified by: JPOWELL Created Date: 1/28/2008 10:48:28 AM Document presentation format: On-screen Show – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Theory Presenters Training Course


1
Theory Presenters Training Course
2
Speed Awareness
Course Presenters
James Powell Road Safety Adviser/ADI
Trainer Carol Melhuish ADI Trainer/Monitor Jo
hn Goodman ADI Trainer/Monitor
3
Housekeeping
  • This Is a No Smoking Area
  • Fire Exits
  • Fire Alarm
  • Toilets
  • Telephones
  • Please Switch off Mobile Phones/pagers
  • Sexist, racist and abusive comments will not be
    tolerated
  • Breaks and Refreshments

4
Speed Awareness
Aim To enable theory presenters to present a
consistently high standard of training to clients
attending Speed Awareness Courses
5
Speed Awareness
Objectives By the end of the course the
presenters will be able to recognise and know
  • The duties of a theory presenter
  • The structure of speed awareness courses
  • Enhance his/her professional development skills

6
Preparation
  • Prepare handouts
  • Check resources are working
  • Set out room
  • Arrange refreshments
  • Meet and greet clients discover any problems
  • Check documents if necessary

7
Speed Awareness
Responsibilities for Course and Clients.
  • Meet and Greet Clients waiting areas In/Out.
  • Dress code.
  • Room set up.
  • Licence checks DVLA / Legality.
  • Foreign licences / revoked.

8
Speed Awareness
  • Special Instructions / Autos check / Medical /
    special needs / disabilities not always obvious
    / hearing Loop system.
  • Interpreters / Signers presenters special
    responsibilities.
  • Religious requirements.

9
Classroom Layout Theatre Style
10
Classroom Layout - Circle
11
Classroom Layout - Groups
12
Classroom Layout Semi-circle
13
Classroom Layout - Boardroom
14
Classroom Layout U shape
15
Speed Awareness
  • Client allocation / mix - male female / talkers /
    sleepers.
  • Attitude / bad / disruptive / negative / none
    participation.
  • Problem questions - clients wishing to leave
    early / Mob.Phones / Disruptive questions?
  • Travel sickness.
  • Late arrivals / special circumstances e.g.crash
  • Leavers/ walk outs / short break head count.

16
Question and Answer
  • Open and closed questions
  • Proactive and reactive instruction

17
Open Questions
  • Who-What-When-Where-Why-Which-How?
  • Questions that require an answer other than yes,
    no or dont know
  • Examples
  • What can you see on the left?
  • How are you going to deal with it?
  • Who has the priority here?

18
Closed Questions
  • Require a yes or no answer
  • Example
  • Have you seen the blue car?
  • Is that a pelican crossing?

19
Proactive and Reactive
  • Proactive - before it happens
  • Examples
  • Which way is the road going?
  • How do you know?
  • What can you see?

20
Proactive and Reactive
  • Reactive after it has gone
  • Examples
  • Did you see the sign?
  • What have we just passed?

21
Speed Awareness
  • The Psychology of Drivers

22
Aim
  • This element of the course is designed to show
    driving instructors how aspects of human
    behaviour affect driving choices

23
Objectives
  • By the end of this element you will be able to
  • Understand the difference between L drivers and
    full licence holders
  • Know and be able to distinguish driving
    violations, between lapses errors and violations
  • Understand how transactional analysis may be used
    to facilitate learning
  • Know how to use a driving strategy
  • Help clients in making personal changes to their
    attitude and behaviour

24
Driver Development
  • The Three Phases of Driver Development
  • Technical mastery
  • Reading the road
  • Expressive phase
  • (Attitudes and Behaviour 2001) Dianne
    Parker and Steve Stradling

25
Technical Mastery
  • The driver learns how to control, position and
    manoeuvre the vehicle
  • This would be a new driver learning how to
    operate and control the vehicle, and until they
    can do so, they are unsafe
  • The UK driving test makes a thorough assessment
    of these skills

26
Reading the Road
  • The driver has to concentrate and be able to
    observe and anticipate.
  • The observations should include hazard perception
    leading to anticipating the actions of other road
    users. This is sometimes difficult for novice
    drivers.
  • The UK driving test requires a reasonable
    standard of these skills. Until they are
    attained the driver is a liability.

27
Expressive Phase
  • The driver now uses the manner in which he/she
    drives to express his/her personality, attitude
    and motivation
  • Learned safe driving strategies will be
    overridden
  • When this manner of driving is affected by a bad
    attitude the driver becomes dangerous
  • The expressive phase is where our clients will be.

28
Violations
  • Lapses embarrassing or inconvenient
  • Errors - mistakes, misjudgements etc
  • Violations aggressive, unsafe, illegal

29
Violations
  • Examples of lapses
  • Forget to put handbrake on
  • Start off in third gear
  • Forget where car is parked

30
Violations
  • Examples of errors
  • Underestimate the speed on an oncoming vehicle
    when overtaking
  • Fail to check rear-view mirror before pulling out
    or changing lanes
  • On turning left, fail to see a cyclist riding up
    the inside

31
Violations
  • Examples of violations
  • Disregard the speed limits late at night or early
    in the morning
  • Drive especially close to the vehicle in front in
    order for them to drive faster
  • Cross a junction knowing that the traffic lights
    have already turned against you

32
Transactional Analysis
  • Transactional analysis is the study of human
    behaviour patterns
  • These fall into three ego states
  • Parent
  • Adult
  • Child

33
Transactional Analysis
  • We move easily between these ego states,
    triggered or influenced by the mood, attitude or
    circumstances that we find ourselves in at any
    given time
  • The actions and attitudes of others can influence
    our ego state when we transact with them

34
Transactional Analysis
controlling Parent nurturing
rational Adult logical
adapted Child free
35
Transactional Analysis
  • Many different transactions take place, ie
    crossed, ulterior etc.
  • The best transaction to have is
  • Adult to Adult

36
Attitude and Behaviour
  • Aims and Objectives
  • to alter the clients attitude and behaviour
  • By the end of this session the ADI will be able
    to
  • assess the attitude of the client
  • explain what a driving strategy is
  • know how to train a client to alter that strategy

37
Driving Strategy
  • Where does a driver develop this strategy?
  • Learnt behaviour or experience
  • Peer pressure
  • Perceived skill level
  • Knowledge
  • The Instructor must give good and valid reasons
    why the change of behaviour will be of benefit to
    the client

38
Decision-Making Matrix
What are the positive aspect of changing my behaviour? What are the positive aspects of staying as I am?
What are the negative aspects of changing my behaviour? What are the negative aspects of staying as I am?
39
Negatives For Change
  • Situational work demands
  • Exceptional noble causes
  • Optimising wanting to be in front
  • control freak
  • already feel safe

40
Positives For Change
  • Reduced stress
  • Less fuel consumption and maintenance
  • Passenger safety
  • More reaction time
  • No need to worry about cameras

41
Psychology of Change
unconscious competence
conscious competence
conscious incompetence
unconscious incompetence
42
Speed Awareness Course
43
Housekeeping
  • This Is a No Smoking Area
  • Fire Exits Fire Alarm
  • Toilets Telephones
  • Please Switch off Mobile Phones/pagers
  • Sexist, racist and abusive comments will not be
    tolerated
  • Breaks and Refreshments

44
Progamme
  • Add times

45
Whos Who?
SP
The Police
You
46
Who Are We?
Those delivering this course are Highly
qualified professional driver trainers who hold a
substantial amount of knowledge and experience
within the driver training industry.

47
What Is Required of You?
  • There is no pass or fail. However, to
    successfully complete this course you must
  • Attend all sessions
  • Complete all course paperwork, including any
    relevant questionnaires
  • Make a positive contribution
  • Demonstrate a willingness to improve your speed
    awareness skills

48
Confidentiality
  • Agreement of Confidentiality
  • Anything said during the course remains the
    subject of confidentiality however
  • SP
  • Will not condone the attendance on this course of
    an individual who impersonates the driver/rider
    who should have rightfully attended this course.
  • This is a very serious offence and could carry a
    prison sentence



49
Aim
The course aim
  • to contribute towards safer communities by
    increasing your intention to drive at an
    appropriate speed within the speed limit.

50
What Are We Going To Cover?
  • What are the benefits of complying with speed
    limits?
  • How can you raise your awareness of appropriate
    attitudes towards the misuse of speed?
  • What can we identify as the consequences of
    speeding?
  • How can you improve your knowledge and skills in
    identifying different speed limit areas?

51
What Are We Going To Cover?
  • What is your personal responsibility for choice
    of speed?
  • What difference does speed make?
  • How can you recognise the impact of your driving
    behaviour on other road users?

52
Bare Facts
  • Driver/rider error is a contributory factor in
    95 of crashes
  • Excess speed for the conditions is an error
  • Those who drive/ride fast regardless of the
    conditions are 3-5 times more at risk than those
    who do not

53
Pedestrians Killed
  • Vehicle speed
  • 20 mph
  • 30 mph
  • 35 mph
  • 40 mph
  • No. Killed
  • 1 out of 20 5
  • 4 out of 20 20
  • 11 out of 20 55 (estimated)
  • 18 out of 20 90
  • (16 out of 20 80 - children)

54
Pedestrians Killed
55
Statistics
  • Road Crashes are the no.1 killer of young people
    worldwide
  • Every 6 seconds someone is killed or maimed on
    the worlds roads

(make roads safe) 2007
56
How Progress Is Being Made
  • Education of road users (courses like this one)
  • Vehicle design and build
  • Improvement of roads infrastructure
  • Raised standards of learner driving test

57
Speed Limits
  • How can you recognise the speed limit on any road
    you are driving on?
  • What information tells us the speed limit may
    change?
  • Where do speed limits change most often?
  • What are repeater signs?

58
A Guide to Speed Limits
  • 20mph speed limit The 20mph limit is used
    mainly in town centres, high streets, residential
    roads and near schools.

30mph speed limit The 30mph limit is used
mainly in urban areas and villages and
wherever you see street lights unless otherwise
stated.
40mph and 50mph These limits are mainly
used in non-built up areas and where the
national speed limit is not appropriate.
59
A Guide to Speed Limits
  • National Speed Limit For most vehicles the
    national speed limit is 60mph on single
    carriageway roads and 70mph on dual carriageways.

Dual Carriageways A dual carriageway is a
road that is separated by a central
reservation. For the majority of vehicles
the speed limit on a dual carriageway is 70mph.
Motorways For most vehicles the speed limit
on motorways is 70mph unless otherwise
indicated.
60
Excuses
61
What causes you to speed
?
62
Circumstances
Environment
Vehicle
63
Test driving car, Test riding bike Lapses in
concentration, When you are angry, Going with
the flow Listening to fast music, Racing Red
Mist Being late, Tailgaters Peer pressure,
Passenger pressure Distractions, Noble
causes Fatigue
CIRCUMSTANCES
64
When the roads are quiet Unaware of dangers and
consequences Speed perception distorted Sun
blocking speedometer Distractions
ENVIRONMENT
65
Anti-lock braking system Traction control and
other modern devices Vehicle performance Misju
dging overtaking manoeuvres Overestimating your
vehicle control
VEHICLE
66
Circumstances
YOU
Vehicle
Environment
67
Thrill seeking When you are angry Wanting to be
in front When the roads are quiet Failing to
observe speed limits Lack of knowledge on speed
limits Think you can get away with a bit extra
Test driving car Going with the flow Lack of
self discipline Listening to fast music Lapses
in concentration Disregard for personal
safety Misjudge overtake manoeuvre
YOU
Speed perception distorted Sun blocking
speedometer Passenger pressure Peer pressure
Noble causes Distractions Being late
Tailgaters
Unaware of dangers and consequences Overestimating
your vehicle control Complacent in local
areas Playing catch up Test driving car Red
Mist Attitude Racing Fatigue
68
The Likelihood of Being Caught
  • Drivers who speed believe there is a lower
    chance
  • of being caught than those who do not (Guppy
    1993)
  • The less chance drivers think there is of being
  • caught the faster they drive (Stradling
    Campbell 2003)
  • You are here today as a result of efficient
  • technology, if you do not make changes there
    is
  • a high probability that you will be caught
    again.

69
Consequences
  • Loss of licence
  • Loss of life
  • Social effects
  • Psychological effects
  • Knock on effects with family and friends
  • Inconvenience
  • Insurance problems
  • Fines
  • Injury
  • Loss of job
  • Imprisonment

70
Consequences of Crashing
( Discussion )
71
Corporate Manslaughter
  • The Corporate Manslaughter and Corporate Homicide
    Act 2007 is a landmark in law. For the first
    time, companies and organisations can be found
    guilty of corporate manslaughter as a result of
    serious management failures resulting in a gross
    breach of a duty of care.
  • The Act, effective from 6 April 2008, clarifies
    the criminal liabilities of companies including
    large organisations where serious failures in the
    management of health and safety result in a
    fatality.

Source Health and Safety Executive (HSE)
72
Environmental Effects
  • The average Briton annually produces 4.48 tons of
    carbon dioxide. (all activities)
  • The world is already experiencing the effects of
    global warming.
  • Most people take some form of action to try to
    limit climate change.

(environment ministry 2007) The Act on CO2
73
Eco-driving
  • Pump up to cut down
  • Carry less clutter
  • Drive at an appropriate speed
  • Less stopping and starting means less pollution
  • Over revving accelerates emissions
  • Idling fuel is wasting fuel

(environment ministry 2007) The Act on CO2
74
Comfort Break
75
Driving at Appropriate Speed
Barriers
Why is it so difficult to stick to speed
limits? How do we cope with tailgaters? What
can we do to help?
76
Coping Strategy
  • Concentration
  • Observation
  • Anticipation
  • Space
  • Time

77
What You Can Do?
Concentration Observation Anticipation
Space
Time
78
Remember the Solution
Self discipline
Concentration
Observation
Anticipation
Space
Time
79
Looking and Seeing
We often look but seldom see.
80
Looking and Seeing
How many pens are there in this picture?
You have 5 seconds!
81
(No Transcript)
82
Looking and Seeing
  • How many pens?

10 pens
2 pencils
What else did you see?
83
Looked But Did Not See
  • Paper
  • Cup
  • Glasses case
  • Phone
  • Pen knife
  • Pencil
  • Slipper
  • Brief case
  • Back scratcher
  • Ornament of a pig
  • Ornament of a bird
  • Cigarette box
  • Newspaper
  • Envelope

84
(No Transcript)
85
Motorcyclists
  • Detecting
  • Powered Two-Wheelers

86
What Do All Drivers Have in Common?
All travel around in metal boxes
All have at least 4 wheel stability
All can enjoy heat, dry, comfort
All have some form of on-board distraction,
(passengers, music, sat-nav etc.)
BUT all vehicles have LARGE blind spots
87
Blind Spots
Whats hiding in your blind spot?
Before you change direction or make a turn check
your blind spots!
88
Blind Spots
A Bike Might Be There!
89
Small profile UNDETECTED!
Line of travel
Drivers line of sight
90
Small profile UNDETECTED!
Line of travel
Drivers line of sight
91
Small profile UNDETECTED!
Line of travel
Drivers line of sight
92
(No Transcript)
93
SMIDSY ?
  • Sorry Mate I Didnt See You!
  • Bikes 3 of road users
  • Bikes 9 of all casualties, 19 of all
    fatalities
  • Expect the unexpected
  • Look Once Look Twice
  • Think Bike!

Source DfT Road Casualty Statistics GB 2006
94
Hazard Perception
  • DVD video clips SP own clips or available from
    LCC
  • Interactive discussion to develop problem-solving
    skills
  • Develop skills in identifying appropriate speed
    limits

95
Choosing Our Own Driving Behaviour
  • Is it safe to speed?
  • Do we think fast driving is skilled driving?
  • What sources of pressure do we have?
  • How do we resist pressures to speed?

96
Attitudes and Beliefs
  • Cause Effect

Our Beliefs
Attitude Change
Some one / thing affects our beliefs - causes
Causes behavioural change
This directly affects
We can break the chain
Causing changes in their attitude
This affects their behaviour
This affects someone else's beliefs
97
Attitudes and Beliefs
  • Is speeding safe?

98
Debrief
  • What have you got from this course?
  • How do you recognise speed limits?
  • What can you do to stick to limits?
  • Concentration
  • Observation
  • Anticipation
  • Space
  • Time

99
What else can you do?
  • Further driver/rider training
  • Keep your knowledge of the Highway Code up to
    date

100
Pledge
  • Try to identify a particular situation in which
    you may be at risk of speeding
  • How can you stick to the speed limit in this
    situation?
  • Make your Pledge

101
Speed Awareness Course
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