OBESITY HNA - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


Title: OBESITY HNA


1
OBESITY HNA
  • Karen Jackson
  • Public Health
  • 2012

2
AN OVERVIEW
  • Why HNA?- aim
  • Headlines from obesity HNA
  • Adults children with learning disabilities
  • Revised obesity strategy framework for action
  • Way forward for learning disabilities

3
THE CHANGING CONTEXT
-2005-2010
-Halt the rise in obesity
4
OBESITY HNA What It Involved
  • To inform refresh of Dudleys obesity strategy
  • Includes reviews of
  • national and local data obesity lifestyles
  • services and interventions currently in place
  • evidence on emerging interventions
  • stakeholder views,
  • progress of 2005-10 strategy
  • Makes recommendations,
  • Proposes a revised framework for action,
    strategic objectives, monitoring and outcomes
    measures

5
THE OBESITY PICTURE FOR DUDLEY
6
THE OBESITY PICTURE FOR DUDLEY
51,317 People Obese138,532 People Overweight
and obese
7
THE OBESITY PICTURE FOR DUDLEY
YEARLY RATES OF INCREASE YEARLY RATES OF INCREASE YEARLY RATES OF INCREASE
2004 2009
Obese 0.7 0.8
Overweight 0.3 0.0
Overweight obese 1.0 0.8
  • All of current increase due to obese category
  • At current rates 24.9 obese by 2016
  • Halt the rise by 2016- balance of 9400 less
    people moving into the obese category

8
THE OBESITY PICTURE FOR DUDLEY
9
THE OBESITY PICTURE FOR DUDLEY
Reception Year Obesity Prevalence
2006/07() 2007/08() 2008/09 () 2009/10 () 2010/11 () point av yrly change
Dudley 11.4 11.4 9 10.2 10.7 -0.18
W.Mids 10.4 10.0 10.1 10.5 _ 0.03
England 9.9 9.6 9.6 9.8 _ -0.03
Year 6 Obesity Prevalence
2006/07() 2007/08() 2008/09 () 2009/10 () 2010/11 () point av yrly change
Dudley 23.4 20.1 21.0 23.8 22.4 -0.25
W Mids 19.1 19.6 19.8 20.5 _ 0.47
England 17.5 18.3 18.3 18.7 _ 0.4
10
DUDLEY HEALTHY LIFESTYLES
  • Adults Increase in physical activity-46 to 49
    (2004 to 2009,)- but more so in the least
    deprived than the most deprived areas. BME, women
    and girls, older people and overweight and obese
    people - lower activity levels.
  •  
  • Children 70 of year 5/6 year olds get enough
    exercise nationally, which declines to 62 by
    years 8/10 - more so for girls Less children
    cycle or walk to school than in previous years.
  •  
  • Adults5 a day FV intake -remained constant at
    25.6 (2009), -increased in deprived areas.
    Males, BME and deprived areas have a lower 5-day
    levels. 86.9 of the population eat a less than
    healthy diet
  • Children 5 a day FV intake -increased slightly
    for children since 2004. Declines between school
    years 5/6 and 8/10. Children are consuming high
    levels of fatty and sugary snacks on a daily
    basis.
  • Breast feeding Initiation and duration rates
    are falling and lower than W.Mids and England .
    Year 8/10 children 2/3rds would not consider
    breast-feeding

11
HEALTH NEEDS/RISK VARIES
  • There are specific groups that are more at risk
    of developing obesity-
  • Children from low income families
  • Children from families where at least one parent
    is obese
  • Looked after children
  • Young parents- lt21
  • Adults- unemployed or in routine/semi routine
    jobs
  • Older people
  • People of Asian origin
  • Ethnic groups with higher than average prevalence
  • People with physical and learning difficulties
  • People with mental health conditions


12
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13
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14
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15
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16
CONCLUSIONS GAPS
  • Robust initiatives and services in place, but
    impact on public health outcomes not yet
    realised.
  • Interventions - not yet at full implementation
  • takes longer than 5 years for the impacts of
    public health programmes to come to fruition
  • Some programmes have limited resources and are
    achieving only a small reach
  • New action plan - build on these interventions
  • 2005 obesity strategy delivery framework still
    valid to add life-course at-risk population
    groups

17
REVISED STRATEGIC DELIVERY FRAMEWORK
Progressive universalism- universal and targeted
in each section
18
RECOMMENDATIONS
  • Tier 1 Tackling the Obeseogenic Environment
  • Expand reach and impact of programmes increasing
    access to healthy food , active travel, urban
    design and planning
  •  
  • Tier 2 Lifestyles Attitudes, Knowledge and
    Skills
  • Public health campaign to raise the publics
    consciousness
  • Early years primary school age, breast-feeding
    healthy workplace programmes
  •  
  • Tier 3 Treatment Pathways for Adults and
    Children
  • Increase referrals, Improve long-term weight loss
    outcomes

19
SO WHAT ABOUT LEARNING DISABILITIES-why at higher
risk?
  • Higher prevalence of overweight and obesity than
    the average population 1 in 3 obese V 1in 5
  • Less than 10 of adults with learning
    disabilities in supported accommodation eat a
    balanced diet, sufficient intake of FV
  • Carers generally have a poor knowledge about
    healthy diet
  • 80 of adults with learning disabilities not
    taking enough exercise
  • More likely than the general population to have
    avoidable, diet related ill health and a
    shortened life expectancy type 2 diabetes is
    double

20
LEARNING DIFFICULTIES- local prevalence and risk?
  • National prevalence rates 25/1000 with mild and
    moderate learning difficulties, 3-4/1000 with
    severe learning disabilities
  • Locally
  • ? 6023 adults- mild/moderate LD , 2008 obese
  • ? 722-963 adults severed LD, 241-321 obese
  • QOF data (Sept 2011) 53/54 practices
  • 1250 adults mild/moderate severe LD
  • 984 adults- on LD register (moderate/severe),
  • 805 (81.8) also on obesity register
  • 59 male, 41 female
  • Obesity most prevalent for 35-54 year olds- as
    general population
  • Schools Health Behaviour Data suggestion of less
    healthy lifestyle for children with LD

21
WHAT DID THE SERVICE REVIEWS TELL US
  • Environmental changes are universal and will
    benefit all- healthy towns, food for health award
  • Many universal interventions will support people
    with learning difficulties (but need carer
    support or involvement, or need to be aimed at
    carers)
  • Targeted services also in existence- for weight
    management
  • Adults slimmers kitchen for LD,
  • Children Seekers (ages 8 to 18 with LD)
  • Data shortage
  • Systematic measurement and referral of children
    with learning disabilities is patchy
  • Outcomes from initiatives can be lower for LD
    clients

22
SLIMMERS KITCHEN FOR LD
Referral Status Number Universal services
Total referrals 16
Did not attend (DNA) 1 6
Dropped out 1 6
Completed course 14 88
Weight loss 0-2.5 (completers) 8 57
Weight loss 2.5-4.9 4 29
Weight loss 5 1 7 27-55
No weight loss/gained 1 7
23
SEEKERS- CHILDREN WITH LD
2009/10 Seekers (8-18 YRS) ALL PROGRAMMES
Accepted a place 8 261
Attended (rate ) 8 (100) 245 (67)
DNA rate 0 87 (33)
Completed (rate ) 6 (75) 145 (83)
Drop out rate 2 (25) 29 (17)
maintained or reduced BMI 1/8 (17) 84 (71)
reduced/maintained waist size 3(50) 67/80 (84)
Programmes 1 31
where monitoring data available
24
FUTURE FOR LD
  • Making reducing obesity a priority for all- at
    both strategic and delivery levels -
    implementation of the learning disability obesity
    charter
  • Development and delivery of an obesity action
    plan for people with learning difficulties
  • Monitoring data
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OBESITY HNA

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Title: OBESITY HNA


1
OBESITY HNA
  • Karen Jackson
  • Public Health
  • 2012

2
AN OVERVIEW
  • Why HNA?- aim
  • Headlines from obesity HNA
  • Adults children with learning disabilities
  • Revised obesity strategy framework for action
  • Way forward for learning disabilities

3
THE CHANGING CONTEXT
-2005-2010
-Halt the rise in obesity
4
OBESITY HNA What It Involved
  • To inform refresh of Dudleys obesity strategy
  • Includes reviews of
  • national and local data obesity lifestyles
  • services and interventions currently in place
  • evidence on emerging interventions
  • stakeholder views,
  • progress of 2005-10 strategy
  • Makes recommendations,
  • Proposes a revised framework for action,
    strategic objectives, monitoring and outcomes
    measures

5
THE OBESITY PICTURE FOR DUDLEY
6
THE OBESITY PICTURE FOR DUDLEY
51,317 People Obese138,532 People Overweight
and obese
7
THE OBESITY PICTURE FOR DUDLEY
YEARLY RATES OF INCREASE YEARLY RATES OF INCREASE YEARLY RATES OF INCREASE
2004 2009
Obese 0.7 0.8
Overweight 0.3 0.0
Overweight obese 1.0 0.8
  • All of current increase due to obese category
  • At current rates 24.9 obese by 2016
  • Halt the rise by 2016- balance of 9400 less
    people moving into the obese category

8
THE OBESITY PICTURE FOR DUDLEY
9
THE OBESITY PICTURE FOR DUDLEY
Reception Year Obesity Prevalence
2006/07() 2007/08() 2008/09 () 2009/10 () 2010/11 () point av yrly change
Dudley 11.4 11.4 9 10.2 10.7 -0.18
W.Mids 10.4 10.0 10.1 10.5 _ 0.03
England 9.9 9.6 9.6 9.8 _ -0.03
Year 6 Obesity Prevalence
2006/07() 2007/08() 2008/09 () 2009/10 () 2010/11 () point av yrly change
Dudley 23.4 20.1 21.0 23.8 22.4 -0.25
W Mids 19.1 19.6 19.8 20.5 _ 0.47
England 17.5 18.3 18.3 18.7 _ 0.4
10
DUDLEY HEALTHY LIFESTYLES
  • Adults Increase in physical activity-46 to 49
    (2004 to 2009,)- but more so in the least
    deprived than the most deprived areas. BME, women
    and girls, older people and overweight and obese
    people - lower activity levels.
  •  
  • Children 70 of year 5/6 year olds get enough
    exercise nationally, which declines to 62 by
    years 8/10 - more so for girls Less children
    cycle or walk to school than in previous years.
  •  
  • Adults5 a day FV intake -remained constant at
    25.6 (2009), -increased in deprived areas.
    Males, BME and deprived areas have a lower 5-day
    levels. 86.9 of the population eat a less than
    healthy diet
  • Children 5 a day FV intake -increased slightly
    for children since 2004. Declines between school
    years 5/6 and 8/10. Children are consuming high
    levels of fatty and sugary snacks on a daily
    basis.
  • Breast feeding Initiation and duration rates
    are falling and lower than W.Mids and England .
    Year 8/10 children 2/3rds would not consider
    breast-feeding

11
HEALTH NEEDS/RISK VARIES
  • There are specific groups that are more at risk
    of developing obesity-
  • Children from low income families
  • Children from families where at least one parent
    is obese
  • Looked after children
  • Young parents- lt21
  • Adults- unemployed or in routine/semi routine
    jobs
  • Older people
  • People of Asian origin
  • Ethnic groups with higher than average prevalence
  • People with physical and learning difficulties
  • People with mental health conditions


12
(No Transcript)
13
(No Transcript)
14
(No Transcript)
15
(No Transcript)
16
CONCLUSIONS GAPS
  • Robust initiatives and services in place, but
    impact on public health outcomes not yet
    realised.
  • Interventions - not yet at full implementation
  • takes longer than 5 years for the impacts of
    public health programmes to come to fruition
  • Some programmes have limited resources and are
    achieving only a small reach
  • New action plan - build on these interventions
  • 2005 obesity strategy delivery framework still
    valid to add life-course at-risk population
    groups

17
REVISED STRATEGIC DELIVERY FRAMEWORK
Progressive universalism- universal and targeted
in each section
18
RECOMMENDATIONS
  • Tier 1 Tackling the Obeseogenic Environment
  • Expand reach and impact of programmes increasing
    access to healthy food , active travel, urban
    design and planning
  •  
  • Tier 2 Lifestyles Attitudes, Knowledge and
    Skills
  • Public health campaign to raise the publics
    consciousness
  • Early years primary school age, breast-feeding
    healthy workplace programmes
  •  
  • Tier 3 Treatment Pathways for Adults and
    Children
  • Increase referrals, Improve long-term weight loss
    outcomes

19
SO WHAT ABOUT LEARNING DISABILITIES-why at higher
risk?
  • Higher prevalence of overweight and obesity than
    the average population 1 in 3 obese V 1in 5
  • Less than 10 of adults with learning
    disabilities in supported accommodation eat a
    balanced diet, sufficient intake of FV
  • Carers generally have a poor knowledge about
    healthy diet
  • 80 of adults with learning disabilities not
    taking enough exercise
  • More likely than the general population to have
    avoidable, diet related ill health and a
    shortened life expectancy type 2 diabetes is
    double

20
LEARNING DIFFICULTIES- local prevalence and risk?
  • National prevalence rates 25/1000 with mild and
    moderate learning difficulties, 3-4/1000 with
    severe learning disabilities
  • Locally
  • ? 6023 adults- mild/moderate LD , 2008 obese
  • ? 722-963 adults severed LD, 241-321 obese
  • QOF data (Sept 2011) 53/54 practices
  • 1250 adults mild/moderate severe LD
  • 984 adults- on LD register (moderate/severe),
  • 805 (81.8) also on obesity register
  • 59 male, 41 female
  • Obesity most prevalent for 35-54 year olds- as
    general population
  • Schools Health Behaviour Data suggestion of less
    healthy lifestyle for children with LD

21
WHAT DID THE SERVICE REVIEWS TELL US
  • Environmental changes are universal and will
    benefit all- healthy towns, food for health award
  • Many universal interventions will support people
    with learning difficulties (but need carer
    support or involvement, or need to be aimed at
    carers)
  • Targeted services also in existence- for weight
    management
  • Adults slimmers kitchen for LD,
  • Children Seekers (ages 8 to 18 with LD)
  • Data shortage
  • Systematic measurement and referral of children
    with learning disabilities is patchy
  • Outcomes from initiatives can be lower for LD
    clients

22
SLIMMERS KITCHEN FOR LD
Referral Status Number Universal services
Total referrals 16
Did not attend (DNA) 1 6
Dropped out 1 6
Completed course 14 88
Weight loss 0-2.5 (completers) 8 57
Weight loss 2.5-4.9 4 29
Weight loss 5 1 7 27-55
No weight loss/gained 1 7
23
SEEKERS- CHILDREN WITH LD
2009/10 Seekers (8-18 YRS) ALL PROGRAMMES
Accepted a place 8 261
Attended (rate ) 8 (100) 245 (67)
DNA rate 0 87 (33)
Completed (rate ) 6 (75) 145 (83)
Drop out rate 2 (25) 29 (17)
maintained or reduced BMI 1/8 (17) 84 (71)
reduced/maintained waist size 3(50) 67/80 (84)
Programmes 1 31
where monitoring data available
24
FUTURE FOR LD
  • Making reducing obesity a priority for all- at
    both strategic and delivery levels -
    implementation of the learning disability obesity
    charter
  • Development and delivery of an obesity action
    plan for people with learning difficulties
  • Monitoring data
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