European Art - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – European Art PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 6bc3ff-OWYxZ



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

European Art

Description:

European Art Introduce the history and culture of Europe in the 15th, 16th, and 17th centuries Identify terms and concepts that are important for understanding ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:23
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 31
Provided by: ut
Learn more at: http://www.utexas.edu
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: European Art


1
European Art
  • Introduce the history and culture of Europe in
    the 15th, 16th, and 17th centuries
  • Identify terms and concepts that are important
    for understanding European art history
  • Think about history painting and portraits

2
Renaissance Italy
  • Circa 1350-early 1500s
  • About 20 city-states, each state had own type of
    government
  • Powerful families ruled many of the cities
    Medici of Florence, Este of Ferrara
  • Center of early Renaissance art- FLORENCE later
    ROME
  • Roughly three different stages International
    Gothic, Early Renaissance, and High Renaissance
  • Renaissance spread throughout Europe and took on
    different characteristics depending on each
    nation.

3
Did Italians wake up on January 1, 1400 and say,
this is the Renaissance?
  • No!
  • The word Renaissance was not used to describe the
    time period until much later by scholars of the
    time period. The French historian Jules Michelet
    first used the term in 1855.

4
Renaissance Characteristics
  • Humanism
  • Worldly
  • Physical beauty
  • Innovation
  • Individuality
  • Genius
  • Naturalistic representations, with nudes
    representing honesty/simplicity
  • More confident Jesus,

5
HUMANISM
  • THE philosophical movement of the Renaissance
  • Heroic and secular man is a thinker, a learner
  • Focus on the capabilities of what humans can
    achieve, where we fit into the universe
  • Revive the classics and reconcile them with
    Christianity
  • Historical consciousness- where we fit in the
    world, where we are going, where weve been
  • Rise of portrait/self-portrait painting,
    classical history painting

6
Baroque
  • Most of the Blanton artworks are considered
    Baroque
  • Like Renaissance, this term was applied later by
    critics and historians.
  • In fact, historians do not agree on the official
    time period for Baroque.

Simon Vouet, Saint Cecilia, c. 1626.
7
How is Baroque different from Renaissance art?
  • 1. It is full of emotion, energy, movement.
    Renaissance art is characterized as calm,
    reasonable, ordered.
  • 2. Colors are vivid. There is greater contrast
    between light and dark.
  • 3. Baroque is often described as theatrical.
  • 4. Variety of artists and art during the Baroque
    era. Vermeer and Caravaggio are both considered
    Baroque.

8
Range of Artistic Style
9
How should I handle all of these facts on
tours?On tours with school children, we are not
going to fixate over, is this Baroque? Is this
Renaissance? But, wait, she didnt say anything
about Mannerism!We want students to look
carefully and practice reasoning skills.
10
With adults, we may want to give more information
that is instructive, such as, Baroque art is
known for being greatly emotional and having high
energy. Most people agree that the earliest
Baroque paintings were created in the early
1600s.
11
A very important historical development to many
Baroque artists was theCOUNTER-REFORMATIONIn
the Blanton, Italian and French art is very much
influenced by this important happening.
12
What was the Reformation, and why counter it?
  • In 1517, Martin Luther, a Catholic priest,
    launched the Protestant Reformation to protest
    the selling of indulgences (forgiveness of sins)
  • Once the protest began, issues of doctrine and
    theology were included in the protest, and Luther
    became the leader of the movement.
  • Once it spread out of Germany, each nation
    interpreted its needs for reform differently.
  • People leaving Catholic Church to join reformed
    churches or Protestant denominations, so...

13
Council of Trent and Counter-Reformation
  • Met between 1545 and 1563
  • Purpose was to define absolutely what the
    doctrines of the Catholic Church are
  • Begin the reform within church to remove abuses
    that led to Reformation

14
What this means for art
  • Policies
  • Art had to be direct and compelling in its
    narrative presentation.
  • Had to be accurate and not contain added or
    imaginary moments from a saints life
  • Should encourage piety
  • Famous trial of Veronese change the title!

15
Following the Rules
  • The Council of Trent and the professional art
    academies that nations organized dictated formal
    elements and styles to be followed by artists.
    Hierarchy of subjects established.
  • Romes Accademia de San Luca (Academy of St.
    Luke) founded in 1593
  • Frances Académie Royale de Peinture et de
    Sculpture founded in 1648.
  • Separating the artist from the craftsman.

16
In order of importanceHistory and Religious
PaintingsPortraitsGenre ScenesAnimalsLandscape
Still Life
17
History and Religious Paintings
18
Giovanni dal Ponte, Madonna and Child with
Angels, 1410s
19
Heres a story we all know
  • What is wrong with saying that?
  • How would that make someone feel who doesnt know
    the story?
  • What should we say?

20
Religious Art
  • Show sensitivity to beliefs and cultural
    backgrounds different from your own
  • Tell stories- provide a narrative context
  • Use inclusive language- avoid the us/them
    dynamic
  • Try to avoid titles
  • Never refer to a religious story as a myth or a
    religious figure as an idol
  • Be open to learning new things from visitors

21
What if you hear
  • IS THAT TRUE?
  • or
  • THATS NOT WHAT MY MOM TOLD ME!

22
A note on symbolism
23
Portraits
  • Portraits are of a unique individual
  • Portraits commissioned by the sitter or a patron
  • Artist enters into a negotiation and then an
    agreement with the subject/patron.
  • The model is the subject
  • Function of portraits work of art, biography,
    historical document, gifts or proxy, memorial,
    political tool

24
Papal Seals
  • Clement VII Portrait at the Getty

To learn more about papal seals http//asv.vatica
n.va/en/dipl/seals.htm
25
Portrait of a Man
26
Connecting to Today
  • When I talk to students about portraits, I relate
    it to something that they all have done school
    portraits.
  • Take a minute to study this painting. What is
    this a painting of?
  • What has the artist told us about this man? How
    can you tell hes _____? Has he given us any
    clues about this mans personality? Age?
    Occupation?
  • If you were going to have your portrait made, how
    would you dress? Would you want to include
    anything else in the portrait?
  • When you look around the room, does this portrait
    fit in? Why/why not?

27
Italian Portraits
  • Carlo Ceresa, Portrait of a Widow,
  • c. 1640.
  • Bernardo Strozzi, Portrait of a Man,
  • c, 1622-23.

28
Italian Portraits
  • Giacomo Ceruti, Young Peasant Woman Holding a
    Flask, c. 1737-38.
  • Marco Benefial, Portrait of a Lady with a Dog,
    1730s.

29
French Portraits
  • Aimée Duvivier, Le Marquis dAcqueville, 1791.
  • Nicolas de Largilliere, Portrait of a Man, c.
    1715.

30
Bibliography
  • Blanton Museum of Art Guide to the Collection,
    2006.
  • Carol Dunlap, The Culture Vulture, 1994.
  • Nancy Frazier, The Penquin Concise Dictionary of
    Art History, 2000.
  • Oxford Art Online, http//www.oxfordartonline.com/
    subscriber/, accessed August 24, 2009.
  • Michael Wood, Art of the Western World, 1989.
About PowerShow.com