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Routines in a

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Title: Routines in a


1
Routines in a Differentiated Classroom
Blueprints for Success
2
The presence of clear routines for
differentiation in a classroom suggests the
difference between differentiation as an add-on
or a band-aid and differentiation as a way of
life.
3
Routines involve 2 levels of thinking planning
  • What is the sequence of events in your classroom
    that
  • recur and create predictability. How do we do
    things in here?
  • What are the expectations for the students
  • and teacher within each of the repeating
  • events? Whats expected of me
  • when we do X?

4
1st
Lets look at the sequence of events in your
classroom where differentiation fitsor could
fit.
5
What's YOUR Routine??
6
SAMPLE ROUTINE
Introduce and teach concept idea, skill
Provide examples to illustrate
Allow for in-class practice
Assign homework
Why do we conduct our classes this way?
What students might experience the most success
within the structure of this routine?
What students might experience the least success
within the structure of this routine?
7
Susans Routine
Student self-evaluation
Teacher records on clip board
Opening question
Reteach
Extension
practice
Computers
enrich
Notes for test
Anchor activities
Card game
Exit slip for all
8
Teacher Developed Differentiation Models After
One Year of Emphasis
GEOGRAPHY
Check point quizzes with product progress reports
on back-- teacher feed-back and peer
problem solving
5 product choices by complexity and Lets Make a
Deal product. Each product has criteria for
points
test out
Diagnostic Assessment
Teach by Theme
I feel students take more responsibility for
their learning. They excel when they are
permitted to take an active role in their
education.
SOCIAL STUDIES
Product cards at various levels of complexity
matched with and dealt to students
Common Study
I enjoy the challenge of presenting different
options to students.
9
Teacher Developed Differentiation Models After
One Year of Emphasis
ENGLISH
Multiple tasks by interest readiness toward
a common goal
Re-test option with differentiation
Test out
test
Publishing projects
Instruction
Pre-tests
On paper review requirements
This kind of classroom makes teaching children
more productive and satisfying from the
teachers standpoint and from student results.
ENGLISH
5 categories of journal assignments-- Each
category has several project levels. Each project
has a criteria sheet. Teacher varies point value
by student ability
On-going integrated writing and reading
This keeps students interested. I wish someone
had done it for me when
I was in middle school.
10
Teacher Developed Differentiation Models After
One Year of Emphasis
SCIENCE
advanced labs advanced advanced
computer projects guided labs computer tutorial
Whole class reading, discussion, labs
Test
structured
projects

No one ever goes backwards. Everyone keeps going
forward.
READING / ENGLISH
products differentiated by skill and content,
focus, criteria and student selection
Novel in common
What keeps me going is an awareness of all the
different academic needs.
11
Teacher Developed Differentiation Models After
One Year of Emphasis
FOREIGN LANGUAGE
3 Group Rotation
Dialogue / Application (A,B,C) Drill
(B.C.A) Writing / Application (C,B,A)
Assessment
Re-grouping
Intro (A B C)
MATH
Students Whole Opt-In by
class Skill review
Review Extension
Selective Practice
Introduction
Assessment
12
Talk about it
How does your routine speak of intent to focus on
individual rather than only on the whole
class? Where would it be obvious to
students that youre considering their particular
needs? Where is the message clear that this is a
whole-group endeavor?
13
Now
Lets look at expectations for students within
the sequence of events implications for DI
14
Consider Your Routines for

How to hand in materials How the teacher will
know what you know How you will know task
parameters goals time materials working
arrangements quality What to do if you finish
something early
How students enter the room How students leave
the room The order of events in a class
period How to move between groups/tasks How to
get help when the teacher is working with a
small group How to handle materials Student
roles in a group
15
Talk about it
Which of these sub-routines Are comfortable
and Automatic for you and your Students? Which
could use a little (or a lot) if fine
tuning. What are your concerns about handling
these sub-routines effectively efficiently in
a differentiated classroom?
16
Finally
Lets look at some practical pointers for
ensuring student success in a differentiated class
room.
17
Countless unseen details are often the only
difference between the mediocre and the
magnificent!
KIPP
18
With regard to Planning for a Differentiated
Classroom . Some General Considerations
  • Set Parameters for Moving Around the Room
  • Give Thoughtful Directions
  • Give Students As Much Responsibility as
  • feasible ( Teach them to Succeed with it!)
  • Stay Aware, Stay Organized
  • Consider Home Base Seats
  • Establish Start-up and Wrap-up Procedures
  • Teach Students to Work for Quality
  • Emphasize Learning Effort vs. Grades or
  • Ability
  • De-brief troubleshoot with Kids

Tomlinson, The Differentiated Classroom
19
Anchor Activities
A task to which a student automatically
moves when an assigned task is finished, TRAITS
OF EFFECTIVE ANCHOR ACTIVITIES Importantrelated
to key knowledge, understanding, and
skill, Interestingappeals to student curiosity,
interest, learning preference, Allow
Choicestudents can select from a range
of options Clear Routines and Expectationsstuden
ts know what they are to do, how to do it, how
to keep records, etc. Seldom Gradedteachers
should examine the work as they move around the
room. Students may turn in work for feedback.
Students may get a grade for working
effectively, but seldom for the work itself.
The motivation is interest and/or improved
achievement.
20
Beginning Anchor Activities
  • Teach one key anchor activity to the whole class
    very carefully.
  • Later, it can serve as a point of departure for
    other anchors.
  • Explain the rationale.
  • Let students know you intend the activities to
    be helpful
  • and/or interesting to them.
  • Help them understand why its important for them
    to work
  • productively.
  • Make sure directions are clear and accessible,
    materials readily
  • available, and working conditions support
    success.
  • Think about starting with one or two anchor
    options and expanding the
  • options as students become proficient with the
    first ones.
  • Monitor student effectiveness with anchors and
    analyze the way they
  • are working with your students.
  • Encourage your students to propose anchor
    options.
  • Remember that anchor activities need to stem from
    and be part of
  • building a positive community of learners.

21
Teacher Checklist for Group Work
  • Students understand the task goals.
  • Students understand whats expected of
    individuals to make the group work well.
  • The task matches the goals (leads students to
    what they should know, understand, and be able to
    do).
  • Most kids should find the task interesting.
  • The task requires an important contribution from
    each group
  • The task is likely to be demanding of the group
    and its members.
  • The task requires genuine collaboration to
    achieve shared understanding.
  • The timelines are brisk (but not rigid).
  • Individuals are accountable for their own
    understanding of all facets of the task.
  • Theres a way out for students who are not
    succeeding with the group.
  • There is opportunity for teacher or peer
    coaching and in-process quality checks.
  • Students understand what to do when they
    complete their work at a high level of quality.


22
Giving Directions for Groupwork
  • If the whole class is doing the same activity
    then give the directions to the whole group.
  • Do not give multiple task directions to the whole
    class.
  • For small group work, tape directions so students
    can listen to them repeatedly.
  • Use task cards to give directions to small
    groups.
  • Give directions to a group member the day before.
  • A general rule is that once the teacher has given
    directions the students cant interrupt while
    he/she is working with a small group.
  • Ask Me Visors
  • Expert of the Day
  • Consultants
  • Keeper of the Book

23
Assigning Groups
  • Clothes pins with student names to assign them to
    a particular task
  • Color code children to certain groups (a
    transparency with student names in color works
    well)
  • Pre-assigned groups
  • Be sure to include groups by readiness, interest,
    learning profile, by student choice, teacher
    choice, random, homogeneous and heterogeneous

24
Pre-Assigned Standing Groups
10 OClock Groups
11 OClock Groups
Interest/Strength- Mixed
Readiness Pairs
Quads
Grouping By The Clock
2 OClock Groups
1 OClock Groups
Interest/Strength- Student -
Selected Based
Triads Quads
Tomlinson - 03
25
Pre-Assigned Standing Groups
Text Teams
Think Tanks
Similar Readiness Reading Pairs
Mixed Readiness Writing Generator Groups of 4 or 5
Synthesis Squads
Dip Sticks
Sets of 4 with visual, performance, writing,
metaphorical (etc.) preferences
Groups of six with varied profiles used by
teacher to do dip stick, cross-section checks
of progress, understanding
Teacher Talkers
Peer Partners
Groups of 5-7 with similar learning needs with
whom the teacher will meet to extend and support
growth
Student selected Groups 3 or 4
26
Flexible Grouping Chart
Date __________________
Monday, Feb 2
Computer Invitations Skills
Teacher
Tonya
Amy
Steven
Jimmy
Michael
Eric
Tim
Chloe
Heidi
Gwen
Katie
Jane
Catherine
Regan
Stephanie
Kristi
Chris
Dan
Jane
Note This teacher used the term invitations
for permanent folders inside of which she gave
students assignments based on readiness,
interest, or learning style
Velcro/Sticky tack
27
I am writing my rough draft.
I am meeting with my Peer Review Partner.
Tony
Mason
Tim
Emma
Kevin
Nick
Jessie
Juan
Reynaldo
Susan
Shante
Liz
Roya
Jen
Mandy
I am ready for a conference with the Editor in
the meantime, I will work on an Anchor Activity.
I am working in the publishing stage.
Josh
Kate
Andy
Steven
Kelsey
Kyle
Kori
Paige
Matt
28
Transitions
  • Directions for transitions need to be given with
    clarity and urgency.
  • Time limit for transition
  • Address the acceptable noise level
  • Rehearsal
  • Be a floater during transitions

29
If students are stuck about what to do next when
youre with a group
  • They should first try hard to RECALL what you
    said.
  • If that doesnt work, they should close their
    eyes, see you talking, use good practical
    intelligence, and IMAGINE logically what the
    directions would have been for the task.
  • If that doesnt help, they can CHECK with a
    classmate (someone at their table or nearby doing
    the same task). This should be done in a
    whisper.
  • If that doesnt work, go to a designated EXPERT
    of the day who has the skills necessary to
    provide guidance. The EXPERT should continue
    with his work, stopping only long enough to help
    someone who is genuinely stuck.
  • (Tomlinson, 1999, p. 102)

R I C E
If all else fails, begin with an anchor activity
until the teacher can get to you.
30
Rescue cards
Great for workshop times when the teacher needs
to assist individual or small groups of students
while the rest of the class works
independently. Keep them in the same spot and
monitor student use to establish routine More
sets more students can access at
once
Student Tech Tips for Laptop Use
Loose-leaf Ring
My paper wont print! Step 1 Are
you connected to Apple Talk? (If not, and youre
not sure how, go to the How do I connect Apple
Talk? card.) Step 2 Go to the Chooser. Are you
connected to the Room 216 printer? Step 3 If
Steps 1 and 2 dont work, ask another student to
assist you Step 4 See me.
My computer says Unexpected Error -10 Step
1 Uh-oh! Go see Ms. Thorne, the technologist, in
the library. Bring your laptop with you!
31
Hint cards
Chalkboard
(File Folders with support materials
inside)
Self-help and reminders for group or
independent work Can change with units, or be
recycled for similar purposes in different units.
What is a symbol?
Graphic organizers for compare/ contrast
32
Handling Materials
  • Assign jobs to different students (materials
    handler, table captain)
  • As a teacher ask yourself, Is this something I
    have to do myself, or can the students learn to
    do it?
  • Remember that you have to teach kids how to
    become responsible for their own things the
    classroom as
  • a whole.

33
Routines for Handling Paperwork
  • Color-coded work folders
  • Portfolios
  • Baskets for each curricular area or class period
  • Filing Cabinet
  • Key to these organizational patterns is that
    the children have access to their own work and
    know how to file and/or find what they need to
    accomplish a task.

34
I hope in your classrooms
  • Discovery is a given,
  • Doing is a way of life,
  • All students learn to do better than what they
    perceive to be their best,
  • School is the place to be
  • Learning is the thing to do!
  • Adapted from Tomlinson, C.A. (2003). Deciding
    to teach them all. Educational Leadership, 61
    (2), 7-11.

35
Nitty Gritty Pointers
  • Teach silent routines first.
  • Be off limits during transitions.
  • Teach students how to help one another.
  • Guide students carefully in effective group work.
  • Establish partnerships with colleagues.
  • Analyze your processes as much as your content.

36
Involve the Students
  • Share your reasoning with them.
  • Watch them work and learn from what you
  • see.
  • Give them roles that empower them.
  • Ask their advice.
  • Talk individually with students for whom class
  • isnt good.

37
Plan for Success
  • Visualize how youd like the activity to work.
  • Ask yourself, What could go wrong?
  • Plan proactively to avoid pitfalls.
  • Allow time for careful directions.
  • Allow time for closure and de-briefing.
  • Have an escape hatch ready to go.

38
3 minute pause
  • Summarize the key ideas
  • WHAT DO YOU ALREADY DO?
  • WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE TO DO?
  • WHAT CAN YOU TAKE AWAY FROM
  • THIS SESSION TO HELP YOU MOVE
  • FORWARD?
  • Jot notes for yourself or
  • talk with a colleague.

39
The greatest sign of success for a teacher Is to
be able to say, The children are now working as
if I did not exist. -Maria Montessori
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