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Rapid - Lean Six Sigma:

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Rapid - Lean Six Sigma: Kick-Starting Your Continuous Improvement Program Facilitated by: John Besaw, Ph.D. – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Date added: 14 June 2019
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Title: Rapid - Lean Six Sigma:


1
  • Rapid - Lean Six Sigma
  • Kick-Starting Your Continuous Improvement Program
  • Facilitated by John Besaw, Ph.D.

2
Renewal or stagnation!
3
RapidLeanSixSigma
  • Success depends on
  • speed,
  • simplicity, and
  • boldness.
  • A common complaint of traditional Lean and Six
    Sigma is that they take too long.

4
Simplicity
  • RapidLeanSixSigma promotes a culture that targets
    continuous improvement through the relentless
    elimination of waste.

5
For Discussion The person closest to the work
knows how that activity can be simplified or
eliminated altogether. The challenge is to
create an environment that energizes and
stimulates workers to share their ideas.
6
A Systems Approach
  • A whole-systems approach that creates a culture
    in which everyone is continuously improving
    processes.
  • Leaderships commitment
  • Empowered, engaged employees
  • An action orientation

7
  • RapidLeanSixSigma provides the tools and
    techniques for making decisions and solving
    problems - fast.
  • An organizations early success will be realized
    through engaged employees using an empowered
    approach for rapid process improvement.

8
Essential Skills
  • Building Trust
  • Managing Relationships
  • Communicating Effectively

9
Activity
What are the three biggest problems youre
facing?       
10
Journey Never Ends
JOURNEY
RapidLeanSixSigma Current Lean 2004 Si
x Sigma 2000 TQM 1990s American
business rediscovers Deming 1970s
1980s Japan emerges as a leader of
Lean Transformation of Japanese
economy Japanese adopt Demings
principles 1950s Deming goes to
Japan 1950 Deming in America 1940s
11
RapidLeanSixSigmaIntegrating Lean and Six
SigmaSpeed and Simplicity
  • Lean
  • Waste Reduction
  • Velocity
  • Six Sigma
  • Problem Solving Methodology

12
A Journey, not an end state
How are we going to get there?
Shared Vision
Future Value Stream
Lean and Simple
Where we are today
Current Value Stream
13
Orientation Fixing
problems, Not - fixing blame.
We are in a new economic age. We can no longer
live with commonly accepted levels of delays,
mistakes, defective materials and defective
workmanship. Dr. W. Edwards Deming
14

Example Deliverables
Key Deliverables
Performance Counts
Engaged Workers
Increased Efficiency
Higher Levels of Performance
15
Alignment
Clarity Consistency Commitment
16
Quantum improvements come not from simply working
harder or smarter at the same old things, but
from figuring out how to eliminate the need to do
the same old things.
17
Activity
  • What are we doing now that we shouldnt be doing
    at all.
  • There may be too many To-Do lists.
  • Consider A Not-To-Do List

18
Basics
  • Customer defines quality
  • Top management leadership
  • All employees responsible
  • A way of life (our culture)
  • Team problem solving
  • Tools
  • Training for all

19
Two Sides
  • The HARD Side
  • is about
  • processes
  • measurement
  • tools
  • structures
  • procedures
  • The SOFT Side
  • is about
  • buy-in
  • commitment
  • attitude
  • overcoming resistance to change
  • self-leadership

20
Transformation Curve
Cynics
Goal Shift the Curve
21
20-60-20 Rule
  • 20 of the people in the organization
  • will be Transformation Friendly
  • 60 will sit on the fence
  • 20 will resist

22
Emotional Rollercoaster
Vision
To Be
Growth
Awareness
As Is
23
Culture
  • RapidLeanSixSigma
  • Participative
  • Encourage change
  • Job security
  • Continuous improvement
  • Policies that inspire people to
  • want continuous improvement
  • Work with supplier
  • Close to customers
  • Everyone trained in basic tools
  • Traditional
  • Authoritarian
  • No risk-taking
  • Fear of job loss
  • Status quo
  • Systems policies
  • Beat on supplier
  • Distant from customers
  • Few people trained in basic tools

24
Example Anchor to Culture
  • Customer Satisfaction
  • Pride in Continuous Improvement
  • Teamwork
  • Empowerment
  • Employee Engagement
  • Communication

25
Resistance to Change
  • Asking people to work differently often meets
    with stiff resistance.
  • Overcoming resistance to change can be the
    hardest part of our job.
  • It is against human nature to want to change the
    way things are done unless there is a compelling
    reason to do so.

continued
26
  • Leadership leads the cultural change and removes
    barriers to implementation.

Coaches work with teams using RapidLeanSixSigma
tools - putting discipline into the
process. Green Belts Black Belts
27
Leading in a RapidLeanSixSigma Environment
  • Build a Shared Vision
  • Create a Guiding Coalition
  • Empower Broad-Based Action
  • Generate Short-Term Wins
  • Communicate the Vision
  • Anchor RapidLeanSixSigma in the Culture

28
  • Ready
  • Aim
  • Aim
  • Aim
  • Aim
  • Ready
  • Aim

To know, and not to do, is not to know.
29
To Empower Broad-Based ActionUpdate Philosophies
  • Middle Management is often the least equipped to
    respond to the changes because of an autocratic
    style that pervades throughout many
    organizational systems.

30
Generate Short Term Wins
  • Start small, gain success, and then expand.
  • Raise awareness boost enthusiasm.
  • Transform from within.

31
Rapid Recognition
  • Use existing awards and recognition program.
  • Develop additional incentives such as
    certificates of appreciation.
  • Publicize success stories, initiatives, and
    results.
  • Recognize individuals and teams.

32
Build Behavior First
  • People will believe in RapidLeanSixSigma when
    they see behavior that leads them to conclude
    that it works.
  • Use action to gain understanding and commitment
    to RapidLeanSixSigma. Learn by doing.
  • Accept stumbling as part of the journey.

33
Sustainment
  • Customs and Norms
  • Rules and Policies
  • Senior Leadership Behavior
  • Learning Opportunities
  • Communication Networks
  • Rewards and Recognition
  • Infrastructure
  • (formal and informal)

RapidLeanSixSigma
Sustained Improvements
34
Activity Targets
  • Cost Reduction (improved profitability)
  • Continuous Improvement
  • Workforce Engagement
  • Speed and Simplicity

35
For Discussion85/15 Rule85 of professional
errors are a result of business systems.15 of
professional errors are a result of individual
workers.
36
Bias - from Plan to Actions

Actions
Plan
Its OK to learn by trying!
37
Activity
  • One of the keys to success is highly visible
    Leadership commitment to RapidLeanSixSigma
    initiatives. (Employees must perceive active
    leadership during implementation.)
  • How do we do this?

38
Lean
  • Customer defined quality
  • Top management leadership
  • Lean as a strategic issue
  • All employees responsible for quality
  • Continuous improvement
  • Shared problem solving
  • Tools
  • Training for all employees

39
Lean Benefits
  • Why Lean?
  • Improved Processes
  • Reduce Waste
  • Increase System Flexibility
  • Satisfied Customers!
  • Standardization
  • Strong Culture - Team Oriented and Empowered

40
Lean Strategies
  • System/Process Mapping
  • Organized for Flow
  • Total Employee Involvement
  • Pull Systems
  • Design Out Wastes
  • Institutionalized Improvement
  • Standardized Work
  • Visual Workplace
  • 5 Ss
  • Flexible Assembly
  • Supplier Integration
  • Quality
  • Total Productive Maintenance

41
Lean Traces its Roots to Toyota Production
System (TPS)
Best Quality - Lowest Cost - Shortest Lead
TimeThrough shortening the Production Flow by
Eliminating Waste
The right partat the right timein the right
amount
Flexible, Capable,Highly Motivated,
Engaged Workers
Built in Quality
Operational Stability
Standardized Work Total Productive Maintenance
Robust Products Processes Supplier Involvement
42
History
43
Lean Tools and Techniques
  • Value Stream Mapping for opportunity
    identification
  • Kaizen events for rapid improvement
  • 5S for cleanliness and organization
  • Kanban for pull from the customer
  • Work flow / layout improvement to reduce
    non-value add transportation
  • Process Balancing to identify time traps, balance
    workloads and increase throughput
  • Mistake-Proofing to eliminate rework

44
WHAT IS SIX SIGMA? According to Mikel Harry and
Richard Schroeder
A business process that allows companies to
drastically improve their bottom line by
designing and monitoring everyday business
activities in ways that minimize waste and
resources while increasing customer satisfaction.
45
Origin of the term Six Sigma"
Sigma (the lower-case Greek letter s) is used
to represent the standard deviation (a measure of
variation) of a statistical population. The
term "six sigma process" comes from the notion
that if one has six standard deviations between
the process mean and the nearest specification
limit, there will be practically no items that
fail to meet specifications.
46
The Normal Distribution
68.27
95
99.74
-1
0
1
2
-2
-3
3
One Sigma 68.27 Two Sigma 95.45 Three
Sigma 99.74 Six Sigma 99.9997 (3.4
defects per million parts) (Six Sigma being
perfection or pretty close to it.)
47
  • One of the most powerful tools that Six Sigma
    offers to an organization is a structured
    approach to problem solving in a disciplined
    manner, providing for data-driven
    decision-making.

48
A Deeper Understanding
Too often we have dealt with problems at the
level of symptoms -- often not solving
fundamental problems leading to the original
difficulty. A fix at the level of symptoms
exacerbates the original problem and makes
solution more difficult.
49
Concept
  • A standard problem-solving process provides the
    means for basing decisions on data.
  • Sustained improvement is only possible with
    employee engagement.

50
DMAIC
51
You may have experienced problem solving as a
one-step process - Solve it! There is much more
to it. You have to know what the problem really
is, whats causing it and look at creative ways
of solving it. DMAIC as a problem-solving model
can be used as a road map.
52
Define
  • Why is this a problem?
  • What specifically is the problem?
  • What pain is occurring?
  • Where is the problem occurring or not occurring?
  • When did the problem first occur?
  • How much of a problem do we really have?
  • Who is involved with the problem? Who is not?

53
Measure
  • Identify essential information that is needed to
    understand the problem.
  • Collect data.
  • Use data a lot of people will have opinions, but
    data are more reliable.

54
Analyze
  • Brainstorm as many solutions as possible.
  • Get the ideas of those who are affected by the
    problem, involving them directly.
  • Dont be concerned about cost or feasibility at
    this point.
  • Dont be judgmental of either people or ideas.
  • Select the best solution from among the
    alternatives generated in the prior step.

55
Improve
  • Create an action plan.
  • Identify the steps that will need to occur to
    implement the solution.
  • Identify the time each step will take and create
    a schedule.
  • Identify the human, material and financial
    resources required for each step.
  • Determine the decision makers whose approval will
    be sought.
  • Determine accountability for carrying out each
    step.

56
Control
  • Once a problem has been eliminated - follow up
    the corrective action to make it permanent.
  • Make sure the corrective action is documented and
    understood by everyone.

57
Summary
We look at work as a process with emphasis on
spotting opportunities for improvement. We
assume most people want to do well in their work
its the processes we must concentrate on
improving. DMAIC provides a structured approach
to identify and effect positive changes in the
Continuous Improvement effort.
58
Process
What is a process? A series of tasks that
provide a good or service. (Everything is a
process a series of activities or steps used to
transform inputs into outputs.) Who is the
process owner? The person who, with a stroke of
a pen, can authorize changing the process.
59
Work as a Process A series of activities used to
transform input(s) into output(s).
Internal
Outputs
Inputs
Work Process
60
  • JIT (Just in Time)
  • Standardized Work
  • Visual Workplace
  • Work Flow
  • Basic Tools
  • Value Stream Mgt
  • Kaizen
  • Poka-Yoke
  • Kanban
  • 5S

61
Value stream map
62
Future State Value Stream Map
63
Kaizen
  • KAI ZEN
  • To modify, to change Think, make good, make
    better
  • KAIZEN
  • Make it easier by studying it and making the
    improvement through elimination of waste.
  • The organized use of common sense to improve
    cost, quality, delivery and responsiveness to
    customer needs.

64
Continuous Improvement Vehicle
  • Kaizen is the focused application of
    RapidLeanSixSigma tools to reduce muda (waste) to
    improve cost, quality, delivery, speed,
    flexibility and responsiveness to internal and
    external customer needs.
  • Kaizen focuses on incremental change and is the
    continuous improvement vehicle
  • Kaizen is a vehicle for driving quick hit value
    by implementing do-now solutions through
    employee involvement

65
Basic Tools
  • 1. Brainstorming
  • 2. Flow charts (process flow charting)
  • 3. Check sheets
  • 4. Histograms
  • 5. Pareto analysis
  • 6. Fishbone diagram (cause effect)
  • 7. Input/Output

Regardless of which tools are listed, the
fundamental criterion is that the tool be a
structured technique for collecting and analyzing
data.
66
Brainstorming
  • To establish a common method for a team to
    creatively and efficiently generate a high volume
    of ideas on any topic by creating a process that
    is free of criticism and judgement.
  • Encourages open thinking when a team is stuck in
    the same old way of thinking.
  • Gets all team members involved and enthusiastic
    so that a few people dont dominate the whole
    group.
  • Allows team members to build on each others
    creativity while staying focused on their joint
    mission.

67
Two Methods for Brainstorming
  • Structured a process in which each team member
    gives ideas in turn.
  • Unstructured a process in which team members
    give ideas as they come in mind.

68
Brainstorming with Post-its
  • This tool builds on Brainstorming because it
    allows group members to record their own options
    on Post-it notes as they are generated. Group
    members say their options aloud to the group,
    write them on a Post-it note, and give them to a
    group leader or facilitator, who displays the
    Post-its in a visible place.

69
Flow Chart
  • A process or flow of activities
  • Used to
  • Aid understanding how the process works
  • Display and explain
  • Analyze and improve
  • Facilitate training of team
  • Document the standard method of a process

70
Flowchart Symbols
71
Getting to Work
SNOOZE
EAT
ALARM SOUNDS
NO
SHOWER AND DRESS
ARRIVE AT WORK
DRIVE TO WORK
NO
YES
YES
BREAKFAST
72
A form for recording data. It might be used to
record bad parts, typing errors, or anything else
for that matter whatever you are trying to fix.
Check Sheet
73
Check Sheet
COMPONENTS REPLACED BY LAB TIME PERIOD REPAIR
TECHNICIAN Bob
TV SET MODEL 1013 Integrated Circuits Capaci
tors
Resistors Transformers Commands CRT

74
Anna Smiths First Grade Daily Self-EvaluationScr
oggs Elementary School, Chapel Hill, NC
75
Also called a bar graph, is used for arranging
and displaying data by groups or classes. It
helps you spot patterns in a whole bunch of data.
Histograms
76
Cause and Effect (Fishbone)
METHOD
PEOPLE
EFFECT
ENVIRONMENT
MATERIAL
EQUIPMENT
CAUSE
77
Fishbone Diagram
Machines
Measurement
Human
Out of adjustment
Poor supervision
Faulty testing equipment
Lack of concentration
Tooling problems
Incorrect specifications
Improper methods
Old / worn
Inadequate training
Quality Problem
Inaccurate temperature control
Poor process design
Defective from vendor
Ineffective quality management
Not to specifications
Dust and Dirt
Material- handling problems
Deficiencies in product design
Process
Environment
Materials
Identification of the most probable cause(s)
leads to development of a theory for solution.
78
A histogram that shows problems or possible
causes arranged according to the frequency with
which they occur. 80 / 20 rule Trivial many
/ vital few
Pareto
79
Fault Prioritization
Total of 133 Faults in descending order
Frequency
19
12
9
4
2
32
55
Pump Timing
Joint Leaking
Faulty Injector
Injector Sticking
2 Seating Washers
Injector not sealing
Incorrect Fuel Level
80
5 Whys
  • Ask Why? Thats the key to finding the root
    cause (or causes) of a problem. This technique
    can also help you understand how different causes
    might be related. Asking Why? lets you focus
    on the process, and avoids focussing on
    personalities.
  • (Source Taiichi Ohnos practice of asking
    why five times whenever a problem was
    encountered, in order to identify the root cause
    of the problem so that effective countermeasures
    could be developed and implemented.)

81
Why 1. Why 2. Why 3. Why 4. Why 5.
Activity 5 Whys
82
Example
Problem Oil leaks from the hydraulic
press 1. Why? Clogged filter 2. Why?
Oil was dirty 3. Why? Metal filings
got into oil 4. Why? Oil fill cap
missing 5. Why? Misplaced lost
Find the root cause
Solution! Oil filler cap attached to filler neck
by a chain (Poka-Yoke)
83
Benchmarking
  • A careful study of some specific aspect of an
    outstanding company (its customer service hot
    line, for instance) in order to establish a
    standard against which to measure and improve
    your own way of doing something.

84
Process Control Chart
Sample number
85
No Cookbooks
  • There are no cookbooks for change.
  • There is an inherent messiness to change.
  • Change implementation should not be considered a
    once-and-for-all effort.
  • The contingency approach suggests that there is
    no one best way.

86
Raise Awareness - Build Enthusiasm
Leadership Team
Process Owners
Coaches
Workers
87
Initial Steps Might Look Like This
  • Generate executive leadership interest
  • Conduct executive overview
  • Decide to move forward with implementation
  • Conduct training
  • Select the first pilot
  • Decide to expand the initiative
  • Integrate lessons learned

88
11 Keys to Getting Started
  1. Tie RapidLeanSixSigma Efforts to Business
    Strategy
  2. Keep Message Simple and Clear
  3. Develop Your Own Path
  4. Focus on Short-Term Results
  5. Focus on Long-Term Growth and Development
  6. Publicize Results, Admit Setbacks, and Learn from
    Both
  7. Make An Investment to Make It Happen
  8. Use RapidLeanSixSigma Tools and Techniques
  9. Link Customers, Process, Data, and Innovation
  10. Make Top Leaders Responsible and Accountable
  11. Make Learning an Ongoing Activity

89
The Gallery Walk
90
Quality Improvement Story
Identify Improvement Opportunity
  • Select Process for Improvement .
  • Set a target for improvement (objective
    statement)
  • Describe Process Flow
  • Analyze flow for ways to streamline process
  • Brainstorm Cause and Effect Analysis
  • Collect Baseline Process Information using tools
  • such as checksheets, Pareto charts, histograms,
    etc.
  • Focus on the root cause
  • Imagineering of ideal process
  • Benchmarking
  • Take Actions that correct root cause
  • Use baseline before and after the improvement
    effort

Define Measure Analyze Improve Control
Gather Data
Determine What Changes Would Help
Select and Implement a Change
Did it Work?
No
Yes
Make Permanent
91
Quality Improvement Story
  • Select Process for Improvement .
  • Set a target for improvement (objective
    statement)
  • Describe Process Flow
  • Analyze flow for ways to streamline process
  • Brainstorm Cause and Effect Analysis
  • Collect Baseline Process Information using tools
  • such as checksheets, Pareto charts, histograms,
    etc.
  • Focus on the root cause
  • Imagineering of ideal process
  • Benchmarking
  • Take Actions that correct root cause

Identify Improvement Opportunity
Define Measure Analyze Improve Control
Gather Data
Determine What Changes Would Help
Select and Implement a Change
Did it Work?
No
Yes
Make Permanent
92
Quality Improvement Story
  • Select Process for Improvement .
  • Set a target for improvement (objective
    statement)
  • Describe Process Flow
  • Analyze flow for ways to streamline process
  • Brainstorm Cause and Effect Analysis
  • Collect Baseline Process Information using tools
  • such as checksheets, Pareto charts, histograms,
    etc.
  • Focus on the root cause
  • Imagineering of ideal process
  • Benchmarking
  • Take Actions that correct root cause

Identify Improvement Opportunity
Define Measure Analyze Improve Control
Gather Data
Determine What Changes Would Help
Select and Implement a Change
Did it Work?
No
Yes
Make Permanent
93
Quality Improvement Story
  • Select Process for Improvement .
  • Set a target for improvement (objective
    statement)
  • Describe Process Flow
  • Analyze flow for ways to streamline process
  • Brainstorm Cause and Effect Analysis
  • Collect Baseline Process Information using tools
  • such as checksheets, Pareto charts, histograms,
    etc.
  • Focus on the root cause
  • Imagineering of ideal process
  • Benchmarking
  • Take Actions that correct root cause

Identify Improvement Opportunity
Define Measure Analyze Improve Control
Gather Data
Determine What Changes Would Help
Select and Implement a Change
Did it Work?
No
Yes
Make Permanent
94
Quality Improvement Story
  • Select Process for Improvement .
  • Set a target for improvement (objective
    statement)
  • Describe Process Flow
  • Analyze flow for ways to streamline process
  • Brainstorm Cause and Effect Analysis
  • Collect Baseline Process Information using tools
  • such as checksheets, Pareto charts, histograms,
    etc.
  • Focus on the root cause
  • Imagineering of ideal process
  • Benchmarking
  • Take Actions that correct root cause

Identify Improvement Opportunity
Define Measure Analyze Improve Control
Gather Data
Determine What Changes Would Help
Select and Implement a Change
Did it Work?
No
Yes
Make Permanent
95
Quality Improvement Story
  • Select Process for Improvement .
  • Set a target for improvement (objective
    statement)
  • Describe Process Flow
  • Analyze flow for ways to streamline process
  • Brainstorm Cause and Effect Analysis
  • Collect Baseline Process Information using tools
  • such as checksheets, Pareto charts, histograms,
    etc.
  • Focus on the root cause
  • Imagineering of ideal process
  • Benchmarking
  • Take Actions that correct root cause

Identify Improvement Opportunity
Define Measure Analyze Improve Control
Gather Data
Determine What Changes Would Help
Select and Implement a Change
Did it Work?
No
Yes
Make Permanent
96
Getting Started
Burning Platform
97
Transformation Planning
Stage 1 Awareness of Need for Change
Decision to Alter Status Quo
Mutual Expectations and Obligations
Stage 2 Entry and Intervention
Stage 3 Development of Mutual Expectations
Need for Valid Information
Stage 4 Data Collection Intervention
Identification of Problem Areas
Stage 5 Diagnosis of Specific Problems
Formulating Plans and Programs
Stage 6 Making Things Happen
Participation of and Feedback to Members
Stage 7 Monitor, Review and Stabilize
Self Renewal Capability
98
Resistence Looks Like ...
  • Anger
  • Blame
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Isolation
  • Fear

99
The Transformation Curve
100
Transformation Planning Tracking System
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sept
Oct
Nov
Dec
Coaching/ Training
Booster Month
Communication Campaign
Coaching
Promotion
Evaluation
Follow-up
Continuous Improvement
Training Master Plan
101
RapidLeanSixSigma - Coach
  • Repository of information
  • Process helper
  • Resource linker
  • Help reduce resistance/win support
  • Link job specifics with RapidLeanSixSigma
  • Harmonize with different initiatives
  • Help with necessary skill development
  • Not decision maker
  • Strength must be in listening to and
    understanding what is working and what is not
    working. This typically includes a "deeper
    understanding" of patterns that may be
    problematic and then facilitating strategy
    sessions to do something about them.

102
Characteristics of a Black Belt
  • Highly effective Team Facilitator
  • Highly Respected by Superiors, Peers and
    Subordinates
  • Inspires Others to Excell
  • Possesses a Creative, Critical, Out-of-the-Box
    Intellect
  • Accepts Responsibility for identifying choices
  • Solicits Diverse Ideas and Viewpoints
  • Acts Decisively Under Pressure
  • Effective in Mentoring and Coaching others
  • Team Engagement

103
  • Resources

104
Parking Lot
105
Kaizen
106
"Who do you think taught Japan how to make cars?"
  • Taiichi Ohno, the father of the Toyota production
    system, said openly that he got the idea from
    Henry Ford's book and the American supermarket.
  • Ford's Today and Tomorrow (1926) describes the
    benefits of just-in-time (JIT) manufacturing
    explicitly.
  • In a supermarket, replenishment of shelf stock is
    triggered by depletion it is a "pull" system.
  • Taylor influenced Shigeo Shingo

107
Lean Manufacturing
Toyota Production
Lean Enterprise
Craft Production
Mass Production
Frederick W. Taylor Used Scientific Management
to look at individual workers and work methods.
Henry Ford Charles Sorensen
Taichii Ohno Shigeo Shingo
Developed the first comprehensive Mfg
Strategy Result Just In Time and Flow
Manufacturing
Recognized the central role of inventory
assessed shortcomings of FORD system Result
Toyota Prod System (TPS)
James Womack Daniel Jones
Result Time study and Standardized work
First coined the term Lean Manufacturing in
their book Result Concluded TPS as the most
successful production system
108
Y f(x) Y is equal to the function of X or Y
is only as good as the input and process of X
X
X
X
X
  • Inputs and processes (X) have a profound effect
    on the output (Y)
  • Controlling the inputs, their interactions and
    the process will improve
  • the output

109
For Comparison
Baldridge Award Criteria (1000 points)
110
CAP The Change Acceleration Process
111
  • Resources

112
Website for the Lean Enterprise Institute books,
workbooks, and case studies that help companies
transform themselves based on the principles of
the Toyota Business System.
  • http//www.lean.org/

113
Online Resource
  • http//www.12manage.com/methods_value_stream_mappi
    ng.htmluserforum

114
  • Nalicheri, N., Baily, C., Cade, S. The lean,
    green service machine. http//www.strategy-busine
    ss.com/
  • Poppendick, M. (2002). Principles of lean
    thinking. http//www.poppendieck.com/papers/LeanT
    hinking.pdf

115
For Discussionhttp//www.thefreedictionary.com/ki
ck-starting
  • Lean Six Sigma Lean Six Sigma is a business
    improvement methodology which combines (as the
    name implies) tools from both Lean Manufacturing
    and Six Sigma. Lean manufacturing focuses on
    speed and traditional Six Sigma focuses on
    quality. By combining the two, the result is
    better quality faster.
  • Rapid (adjective) acting or moving quickly
  • Kick-Starting (verb) to do something bold or
    drastic in order to begin or improve the
    performance of something.

116
http//www.infor.com/leanessentials/
  • This comprehensive Web site developed by Infor is
    filled with information to help you improve your
    productivity, profitability and customer
    satisfaction.

117
For Discussionhttp//www.thefreedictionary.com/ki
ck-starting
  • Lean Six Sigma is a business improvement
    methodology which combines (as the name implies)
    tools from both Lean Manufacturing and Six Sigma.
    Lean manufacturing focuses on speed and
    traditional Six Sigma focuses on quality. By
    combining the two, the result is better quality
    faster.
  • Rapid (adjective) acting or moving quickly
  • Kick-Starting (verb) to do something bold or
    drastic in order to begin or improve the
    performance of something.

118
Website for Rapid Lean Six Sigma resources.
  • http//www.johnbesaw.com/

119
Online Resource
  • http//www.12manage.com/methods_value_stream_mappi
    ng.htmluserforum

120
http//www.infor.com/leanessentials/
  • This comprehensive Web site developed by Infor is
    filled with information to help you improve your
    productivity, profitability and customer
    satisfaction.

121
http//www.lean.org/WhatsLean/CommonLeanQuestions.
cfm
  • Common Lean Questions

122
Resource
  • http//www.statsoft.com/textbook/elementary-concep
    ts-in-statistics/?button1

Website for Statistics review.
123
Statistics on YouTube
  • http//www.youtube.com/watch?vuhxtUt_-GyM

124
7 Basic Tools
  • The designation arose in postwar Japan, inspired
    by the seven famous weapons of Benkei. At that
    time, companies that had set about training their
    workforces in statistical quality control found
    that the complexity of the subject intimidated
    the vast majority of their workers and scaled
    back training to focus primarily on simpler
    methods which suffice for most quality-related
    issues.
  • The Seven Basic Tools stand in contrast to more
    advanced statistical methods such as survey
    sampling, acceptance sampling, statistical
    hypothesis testing, design of experiments,
    multivariate analysis, and various methods
    developed in the field of operations research.
  • The seven tools are
  • Cause-and-effect (also known as the "fish-bone"
    or Ishikawa) diagram
  • Check sheet
  • Control chart
  • Histogram
  • Pareto chart
  • Scatter diagram
  • Stratification (alternately, flow chart or run
    chart)

125
Resources
  • http//www.khanacademy.org/
  • Statistics Handbook
  • http//www.strategosinc.com/human_side.htm
  • http//ocw.mit.edu/index.htm (search Lean Six
    Sigma)
  • http//www.moresteam.com/resources/lean.cfm
  • http//www.itl.nist.gov/div898/handbook/quantgal.h
    tm
  • http//www.leansixsigmahpo.com/tools.html
  • http//www.skymark.com/resources/refhome.asp
  • http//www.freeleansite.com/
  • http//www.dmaictools.com/
  • http//www.accountability.wa.gov/leadership/lean/d
    efault.asp
  • http//www.gembutsu.com/lean_faq.html
  • http//leanyourcompany.com/improve/What-are-the-se
    ven-wastes.asp
  • http//www.micquality.com/six_sigma_glossary/proce
    ss_improvement_tools.htm

126
Example of a Leader Message RapidLeanSixSigma
  • Continuous Improvement is a critical
    responsibility of everyone in ltorganizationgt. It
    involves a commitment from the top down and the
    bottom up hard work and the willingness to seek
    out new and better ways of doing things.
  • Your acceptance and practice of the
    RapidLeanSixSigma tools and techniques is
    critical to our Continuous Improvement success.
  • Leader Signature
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