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Revised

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Title: PowerPoint Presentation Author: Emma Strathdee Last modified by: Gemma Bown Created Date: 2/14/2008 11:44:40 AM Document presentation format – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Revised


1
Revised Curriculum 2008 Range
2
Index
Subject Area Page Language Literacy and
Communication FP 3 Language Literacy and
Communication KS2 4 English 4 Modern
Foreign Languages 5 Knowledge and
Understanding of the World FP 6 Knowledge and
Understanding of the World KS2 7 Science 7 Ge
ography 8 History 9 IT 10 Mathemati
cal Development FP 11 Mathematical Development
KS2 13 Creative Development FP 15 Creative
Development KS2 16 Art and Design 16 Music
17 Design and Technology 18 Personal and
Social FP 19 Personal and Social
KS2 20 Physical Development
FP 21 Physical Development KS2 22
3
Index continued
Subject Area Page Welsh Language Development
FP 23 Welsh Language Development
KS2 24 Religious Education FP 25 Religious
Education KS2 27
4
Guide to Symbols
Developing ICT Learners develop their ICT skills
across the curriculum by finding, developing,
creating and presenting information and ideas and
by using a wide range of equipment and
software. Developing number Learners develop
their number skills across the curriculum by
using mathematical information, calculating, and
interpreting and presenting findings. Developin
g thinking Learners develop their thinking across
the curriculum through the processes of planning,
developing and reflecting. Developing
communication Learners develop their
communication skills across the curriculum
through the skills of oracy, reading, writing and
wider communication.
1
5
Guide to Symbols continued
Curriculum Cymreig (7-14) and Wales, Europe and
the World (14-19) Learners aged 7 14 should be
given opportunities to develop and apply
knowledge and understanding of the cultural,
economic, environmental and linguistic
characteristics of Wales. Learners aged 14-19
should have opportunities for active engagement
in understanding the political, social, economic
and cultural aspects of Wales as part of the
world as a whole. Personal and social
education Learners should be given opportunities
to promote their health and emotional well-being
and moral and spiritual development to become
active citizens and to promote sustainable
development and global citizenship and to
prepare for lifelong learning. Careers and the
world of work Learners aged 11-19 should be given
opportunities to develop their awareness of
careers and the world of work and how their
studies contribute to their readiness for a
working life.
2
6
Language, Literacy and Communication Foundation
Phase
  • Range
  • Children should be given opportunities to
  • experience activities in the indoor and outdoor
    learning environments
  • experience the different types of play and a
    range of planned activities including those that
    are child initiated
  • engage as individuals and in groups, talking
    to different audiences including friends, the
    class, teachers, practitioners and other
    familiar adults and visitors
  • experience a range of stimuli including
  • - simple rhymes, nursery rhymes, songs stories
    and poetry
  • - stories, both real and imagined
  • - information texts
  • - media and ICT texts, such as childrens TV
    programmes and animated tales on CD
  • talk/communicate, spontaneously and though
    structures activities, for a variety of
    purposes, including
  • - repeating rhymes and poems, sometimes from
    memory
  • - telling and retelling stories, both real and
    imagined
  • - talking of matters of immediate and personal
    interest
  • - discussing information texts
  • - asking and answering questions
  • - expressing thought, ideas and feelings, likes,
    dislikes and needs
  • - expressing opinions
  • Range
  • Children should be given opportunities to
  • hear lively readings from a variety of sources
  • be introduced extensively to books, stories
    and words around them
  • read individually and collaboratively
  • read aloud their own work and other texts to
    different audiences
  • experience and respond to a wide range of
    print and fonts that include
  • - picture books, plays, stories with familiar
    settings, those based on imaginary or fantasy
    worlds, retellings of traditional folk tales
    and fairy stories, poems and chants, including
    those with patterned and predictable language
  • - stories and poems from Wales and a range of
    cultures
  • - information, reference and non-literary texts,
    including print and computer-based materials
  • read and share books and texts
  • - written by significant childrens authors
  • - including adaptations and translations
  • - including stories and poems that are
    challenging in terms of length and vocabulary.
  • Range
  • Children should be given opportunities to
  • write in the indoor and outdoor learning
    environments
  • write through a range of planned activities and
    those that are child initiated
  • write independently and collaboratively , in
    response to a variety of stimuli, on subjects
    that are of interest and importance to them,
    including stories, poems, class activities and
    personal experiences
  • write in range of genres, incorporating some
    of the different characteristics of these forms,
    e.g. stories, diaries, poems notes, e.g. lists,
    captions records, e.g. observations and
    messages records, e.g. observations and
    messages, e.g. notices, invitations,
    instructions
  • write for different audiences, including
    peers, adults, members of their family and
    themselves.

Range
3
7
Language, Literacy and Communication Key Stage 2
- English
  • Range
  • Pupils should be given opportunities to develop
    their reading/viewing skills through
  • 1. becoming enthusiastic and reflective readers
  • 2. reading individually and collaboratively
  • 3. experiencing and responding to a wide range of
    texts that include
  • - information, reference and other non-literacy
    texts, including print, media, moving image
    and computer-based materials
  • - poetry, prose and drama, both traditional and
    contemporary
  • - texts with a Welsh dimension and texts from
    other cultures
  • 4. reading/viewing extracts and complete texts
  • - with challenging subject matter that broadens
    perspectives and extends thinking, e.g.
    environmental issues, sustainability, animal
    rights, healthy eating
  • - with a variety of structural and
    organisational features
  • - that show quality and variety of in language
    use
  • - that reflect the diversity of society in the
    twenty-first century
  • - that reflect individual pupils personal
    choice of reading matter.
  • Range
  • Pupils should be given opportunities to develop
    their oral skills through
  • seeing and hearing different people talking,
    including people with different dialects
  • experiencing and responding to a variety of
    stimuli and ideas visual , audio and written
  • communicating for a range of purposes, e.g.
    presenting information, expressing opinions,
    explaining ideas, questioning, conveying
    feelings, persuading
  • speaking and listening individually, in pairs,
    in groups and as members of a class
  • using a variety of methods to present ideas,
    including ICT, e.g. drama approaches, discussion
    and debate
  • presenting, talking and performing for a
    variety of audiences
  • increasing their confidence in language use
    by drawing on their knowledge of English, Welsh
    and other languages
  • engaging in activities that focus on words,
    their derivation, meanings, choices and impact.

Range Pupils should be given opportunities to
develop their writing skills through 1. writing
for a range of purposes, e.g. to entertain,
report, inform, instruct, explain, persuade,
recount, describe, imagine and to generate
ideas 2. writing for range of real or imagined
audiences 3. writing in a range if forms 4.
writing in response to a wide range of stimuli
visual, audio and written.
Range
4
8
Language, Literacy and Communication Key Stage 2
Modern Foreign Languages
  • Range
  • Language learning strategies
  • To support learning a new language pupils should
    have opportunities to
  • 1.  recognise basic approaches to learning a
    language, e.g. imitating, repeating and
    practising
  • 2. use and apply techniques for memorising
    language including rhyme, rhythm, mnemonics,
    physical response and visualisation
  • 3. compare and appreciate differences and
    similarities between English, Welsh and target
    language, developing their triple literacy
    skills and confidence in language use
  • use self evaluation to encourage progress and
    confidence in using the language.
  • Range
  • Intercultural understanding
  • To increase their understanding and appreciation
    of their own and other cultures, pupils should
    have opportunities to
  • celebrate, compare and appreciate differences
    and similarities between their own culture and
    community and that of the target language,
    drawing upon work in other areas of the primary
    curriculum
  • develop sensitivity towards different peoples,
    their customs, values and perspectives
  • appreciate the importance of other language
    learning in a global society
  • work with authentic materials
  • interact with native speakers and learners of
    the language, e.g. visits to the country,
    town-twinning links and Comenius Projects, the
    exchange of materials with partner schools via
    letter, e-mail, interactive use of ICT and class
    projects.

Range Activities and contexts Pupils should have
opportunities to develop their language skills
through 1. languages games including using
ICT, puzzles, numeracy activities and playing
with words 2. responding to and joining in
with songs, poems, rhymes, drama and stories 3.
listening to video/DVD, audio, native speaker
and other language learners 4. big books, the
internet, and CD-ROM activities 5. physical
activities, including dance 6. ICT to support
independent learning 7. art work including
displays, signs and posters 8. working in
pairs and groups producing and practising
dialogues and sketches 9. using language in a
range of creative activities.
Range
5
9
Knowledge and Understanding of the
World Foundation Phase
  • Range
  • Throughout the Foundation Phase children should
    be given opportunities to
  • explore a wide range of stimuli
  • engage with resources from a variety of
    contexts including interactive forms
  • investigate indoor and outdoor learning
    environments, as well as including natural
    conditions as they arise
  • participate in different types of play and a
    range of planned activities, including those
    that are child initiated and those that build on
    previous experiences
  • work on their own and in pairs and small
    groups.
  • Myself and other living things
  • Children should be given opportunities to
  • learn the names and uses of the main external
    parts of the human body and plants
  • observe differences between animals and
    plants, different animals, and different plants
    in order to group them
  • identify the similarities and differences
    between themselves and other children
  • learn about the senses that humans and other
    animals have and use to enable them to be aware
    of the world around them
  • identify some animals and plants that live in
    the outdoor environment
  • identify the effects the different seasons
    have some animals and plants.
  • Myself and non-living things
  • Children should be given opportunities to
  • experiment with different everyday objects and
    use their senses to sort them into groups
    according to simple features
  • experiment with different everyday materials
    and use their senses to sort them into groups
    according to simple properties
  • develop an awareness of, and be able to
    distinguish between, made and natural materials
  • understand how some everyday materials change
    in shape when stretched, squashed, bent and
    twisted, and when heated or cooled
  • understand that light comes from a variety of
    sources, such as the Sun, and that darkness is
    the absence of light
  • understand that there are many kinds and
    sources of sound, that sounds travel away from
    sources and that they are heard when they enter
    the ear.
  • Places and people
  • Children should be given opportunities to
  • learn about where their locality is
  • learn about distance and how to follow
    directions and routes
  • use and make simple maps, to find where
    places are and how places relate to other places
  • identify natural features, e.g. rivers, hills,
    beaches, and the human features, e.g. buildings,
    roads, bridges, of their own locality
  • begin to recognise differences between their
    own locality, localities in other parts of Wales
    and in different parts of the world
  • learn about how and why people and places are
    linked, e.g. where they work and where they go
    on holiday, where family and friends live
  • use atlases and globes
  • investigate how places change, e.g. the
    weather, the seasons, buildings, peoples jobs
  • recognise how peoples actions can improve or
    damage the environment
  • Time and people
  • Children should be given opportunities to
  • sequence events, routines and changes, e.g. in
    a journey to school, in a story
  • measure time, using simple measuring devices,
    clocks, watches and calendars
  • recognise the changes caused by time, e.g. to
    themselves and to people and places familiar to
    them
  • recognise that there are reasons for, and
    consequences of, some actions
  • begin to identify differences between ways of
    life at different times, e.g. by comparing a
    familiar place at different times in the past
  • use a range of historical sources, including
    artefacts and buildings, adults recalling their
    own past, and visual sources
  • look at different representations and
    interpretations of the past, e.g. different
    books/pictures/ICT sources about the same person
    or event.

Range
6
10
Knowledge and Understanding of the World Key
Stage 2 - Science
  • Interdependence of organisms
  • Pupils should use and develop their skills,
    knowledge and understanding by investigating how
    animals and plants are independent yet rely on
    each other for survival.
  • They should be given opportunities to study
  • the names, positions, functions and relative
    sizes of a humans main organs
  • the need for a variety of foods and exercise
    for human good health
  • the effect on the human body of some drugs,
    e.g. alcohol, solvents, tobacco
  • through fieldwork, the plants and animals found
    in two contrasting local environments, e.g.
    identification, nutrition, life-cycles, place in
    environment
  • the interdependence of living organisms in
    those two environments and their representation
    as food chains
  • the environmental factors that affect what
    grows and lives in those two environments, e.g.
    sunlight, water, availability, temperature
  • how humans affect the local environment e.g.
    litter, water pollution, noise pollution.
  • The sustainable Earth
  • Pupils should use and develop their skills,
    knowledge and understanding by comparing the
    Earth with other planets, investigating materials
    around them and considering the importance of
    recycling.
  • They should be given opportunities to study
  • the daily and annual movements of the Earth and
    their effect on day and year length
  • the relative positions and key features of the
    Sun and planets in the solar system
  • a comparison of the features and properties of
    some natural and made materials
  • the properties of materials relating to their
    uses
  • how some materials are formed or produced
  • a consideration of what waste is and what
    happens to local waste that can be recycled and
    that which cannot be recycled.

Range
7
11
Knowledge and Understanding of the World Key
Stage 2 - Geography
  • Range
  • Pupils develop their geographical skills,
    knowledge and understanding through learning
    about places, environments and issues.
  • Pupils should be given opportunities to
  • study
  • - living in Wales their local area and an
    investigation of at least one aspect of the
    geography of the whole of Wales, e.g. national
    parks, where people live
  • - living in other countries two contrasting
    localities in countries at different levels of
    economic development outside the United Kingdom
  • - living in my world caring for places and
    environments and the importance of being a
    global citizen
  • carry out
  • - investigations of geography in the news,
    topical events and issues in the local area and
    the wider world
  • - fieldwork to observe and investigate real
    places and processes
  • ask and answer the questions
  • - where is this place/environment? What is it
    like and why? What is happening and why?
  • - how is this place the same as or different
    from other places/environments and why? Is it
    always the same? Why is it changing?
  • - how are places and environments
    linked/connected to other places and
    environments? How am I and/or other people
    linked to other parts of the world?
  • - how have people affected this
    place/environment? How can I and other people
    look after this environment?
  • - how do peoples views differ about this
    geographical issue and what do I think?
  • The local area should cover an area larger that
    the schools immediate vicinity. It will normally
    contain the homes of the majority of the pupils
    in the school. The contrasting localities should
    be in areas of a similar size to the local area.

Range
8
12
Knowledge and Understanding of the World Key
Stage 2 History
  • Range
  • Pupils should develop their historical skills,
    knowledge and understanding through learning
    about a range of historical contexts. These
    should be based primarily on the local area
    within the wider context of Wales, but including
    examples from Britain and other countries. The
    focus should be on the characteristics of daily
    life during the selected contexts. One aspect
    of daily life (either houses and homes or food
    and farming or transport) should be studied in
    all contexts.
  • Pupils should be given opportunities to
  • study
  • - the daily life of people living in either the
    time of the Iron Age Celts or the Romans
  • - the daily life of people living either in the
    Age of the Princes or in the time of the Tudors
    or the time of the Stuarts
  • - changes to peoples daily lives in the
    locality in the nineteenth century
  • - the differences in peoples daily lives in two
    contrasting periods of the twentieth century
  • carry out
  • - investigations into the history around them
  • and into the life of people at different times
  • and places in the past
  • ask and answer the questions
  • - what do you know about life at this time how
    do you know this and how can you find out more?
  • - what was life like for rich and for poor
    people, for men, women and children, e.g.
    houses, food and farming, transport, education,
    clothes, celebrations, pastimes?
  • - were there significant changes in peoples
    lives at this time and, if so, why?
  • - how have the daily lives of people at this
    time been represented and interpreted and why?
  • - what impact did people of this time have on
    their environment?

Range
9
13
Knowledge and Understanding of the World Key
Stage 2 IT
  • Range
  • Pupils should be given opportunities to
  • use ICT tools and suitable information sources
    safely and legally, in accordance with
    LEA/school guidelines
  • use a range of ICT resources and equipment
    independently and collaboratively, e.g. cameras,
    scanners, CD/DVD players, MP3 players, mobile
    phones, PDAs
  • use ICT sources of information and non-ICT
    sources of information
  • use ICT to further their understanding of
    information they have retrieved and processed
  • use ICT to explore and to solve problems in the
    context of work across a variety of subjects
  • draw upon their experiences of using ICT to
    form judgements about its value in supporting
    their work
  • store and retrieve information they have found
    or created
  • evaluate their work and learning
  • discuss new developments in ICT and the use of
    ICT in the wider world.
  • Health, safety and child protection
  • Pupils should be taught how to use ICT
    comfortably, safely and responsibly, and to
    consider the hazards and risks in their
    activities, e.g. the importance of not disclosing
    personal details to strangers. They should be
    able to follow instructions to minimise risk to
    themselves and others.

Range
10
14
Mathematical Development Foundation Phase
  • Range
  • Children should develop their mathematical
    skills, knowledge and understanding through
    learning about and using Number, Measures and
    money, Shape, position and movement, and Handling
    data.
  • Number
  • Children should be given opportunities to
  • develop an interest in numbers
  • recognise that some numbers/numerals will have
    personal meaning/significance to them and others
  • understand number and number notation
  • - use number names accurately, matching the
    symbol to the sound
  • - count, read, write, compare and order numbers,
    and appreciate the conservation of number
  • - use numbers naturally in their play and daily
    activities, including number rhymes, songs,
    stories and counting activities from Wales and
    around the world
  • - experiment with numbers, and observe numbers
    and patterns in the environment and everyday
    life
  • calculate in a variety of ways
  • - begin to develop their mental calculation
    strategies during counting and grouping
    activities, games and through day-to-day
    classroom activities
  • - progress from counting on or back in steps, to
    mental mathematics involving all four
    operations with small numbers, using their own
    methods to record their calculations
  • investigate patterns and relationships
  • - explore patterns in number tables and
    sequences
  • - begin to understand the relationships between
    addition and subtraction, between
    multiplication and division, and between
    halving and doubling
  • - match pairs of objects in practical contexts,
    leading to an understanding of one-to-one
    correspondence.
  • Measures and money
  • Children should be given opportunities to
  • understand and use measures
  • - compare and order two or more objects in terms
    of mass or length/height by direct observation,
    and for capacity and volume by filling or
    emptying containers
  • - use uniform non-standard units for comparison,
    and see the need for standard units of measure
    use standard metric units of length, mass and
    capacity
  • - choose units and measuring equipment
    appropriate to a relevant measuring task read
    a scale with some accuracy
  • - recognise the time of day in relation to
    regular daily activities understand the
    passage of time in relation to daily activities
    and life events
  • - know and order days of the week, the months
    and seasons of the year
  • - sequence two or more familiar events
  • - gradually read the time to the quarter hour on
    an analogue clock, and relate this to digital
    time
  • understand and use money
  • - develop an awareness of the use of money and
    its value, initially through role play
  • - recognise, sort and use coins find totals,
    and give change.

Range
11
15
Mathematical Development Foundation Phase
  • Shape, position and movement
  • Children should be given opportunities to
  • play with shapes make models and pictures
  • recognise shapes in their environments
  • understand and use the properties of shapes
  • - recognise similarities and differences of 2-D
    and 3-D shapes know the names of more common
    3-D and 2-D shapes
  • - make increasingly more complex or accurate
    models and patterns of shapes
  • - sort shapes according to one or more criteria
  • understand and use the properties of position
    and movement
  • - develop an awareness of position and movement
    during their own physical activities
  • - follow instructions and give directions for
    simple movements
  • - fit together and move shapes and solids in
    various ways
  • - recognise translations and rotations as
    movements and combine them in simple ways
  • - begin to understand angle as a measure of
    turn, and recognise whole, half and quarter
    turns.
  • Handling data
  • Children should be given opportunities to
  • collect, represent and interpret data
  • - sort and classify sets of objects using one or
    more criteria
  • - collect data for a variety of defined purposes
    and from a variety of sources, including ICT
  • - represent collected data initially using real
    objects, pictures or diagrams, progressing to a
    variety of simple charts, graphs, diagrams,
    tables or databases.

Range
12
16
Mathematical Development Key Stage 2 - Mathematics
  • Range
  • Pupils develop their mathematical skills,
    knowledge and understanding through learning
    about and using Number, Measures and money,
    Shape, position and movement, and Handling data.
    They should use a variety of ICT resources as
    tools whenever appropriate.
  • Number
  • Pupils should be given opportunities to
  • Understand number and number notation
  • count, read, write and order whole numbers
  • understand place value in relation to the
    position of digits multiply and divide numbers
    by 10 and 100
  • identify negative numbers and decimals on a
    number line
  • use negative numbers in the context of
    temperature, and decimals in the context of
    money and measures
  • 2. Calculate in a variety of ways
  • use a variety of mental methods of
    computation extend informal written methods to
    non-calculator methods
  • round answers to calculations to an
    appropriate degree of accuracy
  • use the relationships between the four
    operations, including inverses recognise
    situations to which the different operations
    apply
  • use fractions and percentages to estimate,
    describe and compare proportions of a whole
    calculate fractions and percentages of
    quantities
  • 3. Investigate patterns and relationships
  • explore features of numbers, including number
    bonds, factors, multiples, even and odd numbers,
    primes, squares and square roots, and sequences
    of whole numbers
  • explore the inverse relationships of addition
    and subtraction, and of multiplication and
    division
  • Measures and money
  • Pupils should be given opportunities to
  • Understand and use measures
  • choose appropriate standard units of length,
    mass, volume and capacity, temperature, area and
    time
  • understand the relationships between units,
    and convert one metric unit to another
  • read times on analogue and digital clocks use
    timetables and convert between the 12- and
    24-hour clocks calculate time differences
  • know the rough metric equivalents of imperial
    units still in daily use
  • interpret numbers on scales and read scales to
    an increasing degree of accuracy understand and
    use scale in simple maps and drawings
  • draw and measure angles
  • find perimeters of simple shapes find areas
    and volumes by counting and other practical
    methods
  •  
  • Understand and use money
  • know and use the conventional way to record
    money
  • find approximate solutions to, and use the
    four operations to solve, problems involving
    money
  • understand a calculator display in relation to
    money, e.g. that a display of 21.4 (pounds)
    means 21.40
  • be aware of other currencies.

Range
13
17
Mathematical Development Key Stage 2 - Mathematics
  • Shape, position and movement
  • Pupils should be given opportunities to
  • Understand and use the properties of shapes
  • make 2-D and 3-D shapes and patterns with
    increasing accuracy
  • understand the congruence of 2-D shapes
  • name and classify 2-D shapes according to side
    and angle properties
  • know and use the properties of 2-D (polygon)
    and common 3-D (polyhedron) shapes
  • Understand and use the properties of position and
    movement
  • recognise reflective and rotational symmetries
    of 2-D shapes
  • use positive co-ordinates to specify location
  • identify properties of position and movement,
    and use these to classify shapes
  • use right angles, fractions of a turn and
    degrees to measure rotation.
  • Handling data
  • Pupils should be given opportunities to
  • Collect, represent and interpret data
  • collect data for a variety of defined
    purposes, including those that arise from their
    own questions, and from a variety of sources
  • use and present data in a variety of ways
    including tables, pictograms, charts, bar
    charts, line graphs, diagrams, text and ICT
  • calculate and use the mode, median, mean and
    range of a set of discrete data
  • 2. Understand and use probability
  • use everyday language for early ideas of
    probability
  • know that the likelihood of an event lies
    between impossible and certain.

Range
14
18
Creative Development Foundation Phase
  • Range
  • Children should have opportunities to
  • explore, investigate and use the indoor and
    outdoor learning environments
  • be involved in different types of play and a
    range of planned activities, including those
    that are child initiated
  • be involved in activities that allow them to
    work as individuals and in groups
  • use a wide range of resources and stimuli
  • experience traditions and celebrations of
    different cultures
  • experience art, craft, design, music and dance
    from Wales and other cultures.

Range
15
19
Creative Development Key Stage 2 Art and Design
  • In art and design, pupils at Key Stage 2 should
    develop their understanding and investigating
    skills in order to enrich and inform their
    making.
  • Understanding
  • Pupils should be stimulated and inspired, where
    appropriate, by
  • other artists, craftworkers and designers
  • methods and processes
  • media
  • styles
  • ideas
  • local and Welsh art, craft and design
  • images and artefacts from a variety of
    historical and contemporary cultures and
    contexts.
  • They should develop, where appropriate, their
    understanding through
  • books
  • videos
  • digital-based resources
  • the internet
  • galleries
  • practising artist, craftworkers and designers
  • other resources.
  • Investigating
  • Making
  • Pupils should design and make both imaginatively
    and expressively
  • objects
  • artefacts
  • images.
  •  They should use a variety of
  • tools and equipment
  • materials, e.g. paints, pencils, crayons,
    pastels, charcoal, inks, resistant materials,
    clays, sustainable materials, textiles,
    digital-based media, etc.
  • processes, e.g. drawing, painting, printing,
    multimedia, craft processes, three-dimensional
    processes, digital-based processes, etc.
  • They should have opportunities to work as
  • individuals
  • group members.
  •  They should work in different contexts such as
  • galleries
  • art room
  • outdoors
  • the home.
  • Pupils should be taught to consider the hazards
    and the risks in their art and design activities.
    They should be able to follow instructions to
    minimize risks to themselves and others.

Range
16
20
Creative Development Key Stage 2 Music
Performing The repertoire for performing should
be taken from the past and present. This
repertoire should include music from the European
classical tradition, folk and popular music,
the music of Wales and other musical traditions
and cultures. It should extend pupils musical
experience, be progressively more demanding and
take account of pupils needs, interests,
backgrounds and stages of musical
development.  The repertoire for singing should
include unison and simple part songs, e.g.
rounds, songs with a descant, cerdd dant
arrangements, etc. and be appropriate for pupils
vocal range.  Each pupil should gain experience
of playing a wide range of tuned and untuned
instruments, e.g. percussion, recorders,
electronic keyboards, etc.  Composing Composing
activities should involve the exploration and use
of a wide range of sound sources, e.g. pupils
voices and bodies, sounds from the environment,
instruments and music technology. The stimuli for
composing should be musical, e.g. a five-note
scale or sampled sound, and extra-musical, e.g. a
picture, sculpture or poem. Appraising The
repertoire for listening should include pupils
own compositions and performances and the music
of others, of varied genres and styles, from
different times and cultures. It should link with
and extend pupils musical experiences and
include examples taken from the European
classical tradition, folk and popular music,
the music of Wales, and other musical traditions
and cultures.
Range
17
21
Creative Development Key Stage 2 Design and
Technology
  • Pupils should be given opportunities to develop
    their design and technology capability through
  • tasks in which they explore and investigate
    simple products in order to acquire
    technological knowledge and understanding that
    can be applied in their designing and making
  • tasks in which they learn about the
    responsible use of materials, considering issues
    of sustainability
  • tasks in which they develop and practise
    particular skills and techniques that can be
    applied in their designing and making
  • tasks in which they design and make products,
    focusing on different contexts and materials.
  • They should be given opportunities to
  • be creative
  • be innovative
  • work independently and in groups.
  • Taken together, these tasks should cover a range
    of materials and components, including food,
    rigid and flexible materials and systems and
    control.
  • Health and safety
  • Pupils should be taught how to use tools/utensils
    and equipment safely and to consider the hazards
    and risks in their activities, behaviour and
    lifestyle. They should be able to follow
    instructions to control risk to themselves and
    others, e.g. ensure that food preparation areas
    are scrupulously clean risk associated with hand
    tools.
  •  They should be made aware of the impact on their
    health and safety of certain behaviour, e.g.
    healthy eating.

Range
18
22

Personal and Social Well being and
Cultural Diversity Foundation Phase
  • Throughout the Foundation Phase, children should
    be given opportunities to develop their skills,
    knowledge and understanding through being
    involved in a range of experiences including
  • Personal development
  • activities in the indoor and outdoor learning
    environments
  • different types of play and a range of planned
    activities, including those that are child
    initiated
  • Social development
  • activities that allow them to adopt a range of
    roles, including leadership within a small
    group, paired learning or working within a team
  • different resources such as those in print and
    interactive forms
  • activities that allow them to become
    independent learners
  • activities that allow them to use their senses,
    to be creative and imaginative
  • Moral and spiritual development
  • activities that allow them to communicate their
    ideas, values and beliefs about themselves,
    others and the world
  • activities that allow them to solve problems
    and discuss outcomes
  • activities that allow them to begin to
    understand how they can protect the environment
    and become environmentally friendly in their
    everyday lives
  • activities that allow them to feel safe and
    secure and feel that they are valued
  • Well-being
  • activities that contribute to their own safety
  • activities that allow them to make healthy
    choices and to develop and understand their own
    bodies and how to keep them safe and healthy

Range
19
23
Personal and Social Well being and
Cultural Diversity Key Stage 2 - PSE
  • Health and emotional well-being
  • Learners should be given the opportunities to
  • take increasing responsibility for keeping the
    mind and body safe and healthy
  • feel positive about themselves and be sensitive
    towards the feelings of others
  • and to understand
  • the features and physical and emotional
    benefits of a healthy lifestyle, e.g. food and
    fitness
  • the harmful effects, both to themselves and
    others, of tobacco, alcohol and other legal and
    illegal substances
  • the reasons for the physical and emotional
    changes which take place at puberty, to include
    conception, pregnancy and birth
  • the range of their own and others feelings and
    emotions
  • the importance of personal safety
  • how to distinguish between appropriate and
    inappropriate touching
  • what to do or to whom to go when feeling unsafe
  • Active citizenship
  • Learners should be given the opportunities to
  • develop respect for themselves and others
  • value families and friends as a source of
    mutual support
  • value diversity and recognise the importance of
    equality of opportunity
  • participate in school life
  • and to understand
  • their rights, e.g. the UN Convention on the
    Rights of the Child, and responsibilities
  • the importance of democratic decision-making
  • the benefits of families and friends and the
    issues that can arise
  • situations which produce conflict and the
    nature of bullying
  • aspects of the cultural heritage and diversity
    in Wales
  • how injustice and inequality affect peoples
    lives
  • what is meant by disability
  • the challenges learners might have in accessing
    earning opportunities in school
  • Moral and spiritual development
  • Learners should be given opportunities to
  • explore their personal values
  • be honest and fair and have respect for rules,
    the law and authority
  • and to understand
  • how cultural values and religious beliefs shape
    the way people live
  • that people differ in what they believe is
    right and wrong
  • that personal actions have consequences
  • Preparing for lifelong learning
  • Learners should be given opportunities to
  • enjoy and value learning and achievements
  • take increasing responsibility for their
    learning
  • and to understand
  • the range of jobs carried out by people in
    their community
  • that money is earned through work and can buy
    goods and services
  • the importance of looking after their money and
    benefits of regular saving

Range
  • Sustainable development and global citizenship
  • Learners should be given opportunities to
  • appreciate the natural world as a source of
    inspiration
  • take an active interest in varied aspects of
    life in school and the wider environment
  • develop a positive attitude on issues of
    poverty and fairness
  • and to understand
  • how the environment can be affected by the
    decisions we make individually and collectively
  • that local actions have global effects because
    of connections between places and people
  • how poverty and inequality can cause problems

20
24
Physical Development Foundation Phase
  • Range
  • Throughout the Foundation Phase, children should
    have opportunities to develop their skills,
    knowledge and understanding through
  • exploring and investigating their indoor and
    outdoor learning environments
  • exploring, investigating and using a wide
    range of stimuli and resources
  • involvement in the different types of play and
    a range of planned activities including those
    that are child initiated
  • practising different types of games play
  • developing their gross and fine motor skills
    through their practical activities and use of
    varied tools, equipment and apparatus, including
    ICT
  • being involved in physical activities that
    allow them to work as individuals, with a
    partner and in small groups, sharing ideas and
    helping each other to improve their work.

Range
21
25
Physical Development Key Stage 2
  • Range
  • Health, fitness and well-being activities
    activities that are non-competitive forms of
    exercise and chosen for what they contribute to
    general health, fitness goals and feelings of
    well-being.
  • Daily physical activity is an important goal for
    young people and opportunities for this to be
    achieved may be found not only in lessons, but
    also before and after school and during the
    lunchtimes. Finding activities that are enjoyable
    and sustainable is important at this early stage
    of physical development if the goals of a healthy
    and active lifestyle are to be realised. Planning
    to increase participation in activity might
    include walking or cycling to school, joining a
    sports club, or swimming with the family and
    friends.

2. Creative activities activities that are
composed or choreographed and are generally
artistic and aesthetic in nature. In gymnastic
activities, developing means of travelling should
include transferring weight from hands and feet
and climbing activities. Rotation should include
rolling and turning. The composition of sequences
and choreographed dance motifs should include
features such as variations in rhythm, speed,
shape, level, direction and pathways combining
and linking actions relationships to partners,
an audience, apparatus or a stimulus.
4. Competitive activities activities that are
learned for the purpose of competition between an
individual, group or team and others. The
principles underpinning the application of these
types of activity are generally strategic and
tactical, such as game strategies and athletic
tactics and involve competing against others. A
variety of activities should be chosen to teach
the programme of study, enabling pupils to learn
the application of strategies and tactics. During
these activities pupils need to understand why
there is a need for rules in a competitive
situation, and why they should take
responsibility for their actions.
3. Adventurous activities activities that are
underpinned by problem solving, communication,
leadership and teamwork and often have an outdoor
living and learning focus. Participation in
outdoor activities provides opportunities to
increase awareness of the natural environment and
understand the importance of issues such as
conservation and sustainable development.
Adventurous activities may be pursued in
curriculum time, after school, or as part of an
out-of-hours residential experience in new and
challenging environments away from the local
area.
Range
22
26
Welsh Language Development Foundation Phase
  • Range
  • Oracy
  • Children should be given opportunities to
  • experience activities in the indoor and outdoor
    learning environments
  • experience the different types of play and a
    range of planned activities including those that
    are child initiated
  • talk/communicate for a variety of purposes
    including
  • - joining in with simple rhymes and stories
  • - speaking, substituting words in familiar
    patterns
  • - reciting or singing Welsh poems, songs and
    raps
  • - presenting simple information
  • - talking of matters of immediate and personal
    interest
  • - asking and answering questions
  • - expressing feelings, likes, dislikes and needs
  • - conveying personal and imaginative experiences
    using familiar language patterns
  • participate as individuals, pairs and in
    different size groups
  • experience a range of stimuli including
  • - simple rhymes, nursery rhymes, songs, stories
    and poetry
  • - stories, both real and imagined
  • - information texts
  • Range
  • Reading
  • Children should be given opportunities to
  • hear lively readings from a variety of sources
  • appreciate books, stories and words around
    them
  • read individually and collaboratively
  • read and respond to imaginative material, as
    appropriate, which should include
  • - prose and poetry for young children
  • - stories, poems and chants containing patterned
    and predictable language
  • - work written for learners
  • - information resources
  • read and make use, for different purposes, of
    a variety of printed and ICT resources
  • choose from a wide range of books and immerse
    themselves in them.
  • Range
  • Writing
  • Children should be given opportunities to
  • write in the indoor and outdoor learning
    environments
  • write through a range of planned activities and
    those that are child initiated
  • write independently and collaboratively , in
    response to a variety of stimuli including
  • - simple creative pieces
  • - factual information
  • - short passages that express an opinion, e.g.
    Rwyn hoffi
  • write for different audiences, including
    peers, adults, members of their family and
    themselves.

Range
23
27
Welsh Language Development Key Stage 2
Range Oracy Pupils should be given opportunities
to 1.  see and hear different people talking,
including those with different dialects. 2.
experience a variety of audio, audio-visual,
electronic, visual and written stimuli, ideas
and texts, e.g. DVDs, tapes, interactive white
board material, a theatrical performance 3.
communicate for a variety of purposes
including - asking questions and offering
simple comments - giving and following sets of
simple instructions - presenting personal and
imaginative experiences and straightforward
factual information - expressing opinions and
offering a brief explanation - reporting back
using notes 4. work independently, in pairs, in
groups and as a member of a class 5. use a
variety of methods to present ideas, including
ICT, e.g. drama techniques, simulations, holding
a discussion 6. converse with a variety of
audiences including teachers, peers and familiar
adults 7. increase their confidence in language
use by drawing on their knowledge if Welsh and
English and other languages.
Range Reading Pupils should be given
opportunities to 1. develop as enthusiastic,
independent and reflective readers 2. read in
a variety of situation including reading - with
support - independently - in pairs - in a
group - aloud and listen whilst following
print 3. experience a variety of texts and forms
including - traditional and contemporary
poetry and prose including some material
written specifically for learners - material
which is challenging - material that broadens
horizons and expands the mind - material that
presents information and reference material
including media texts and computer
material - extracts and complete
texts - material with a variety of structural
features.
Range Writing Pupils should be given
opportunities to 1. write for a variety of
purposes including - to entertain - to present
information - to express opinions - to convey
feelings and ideas  2. write for a variety if
real and imaginary audiences, e.g. oneself,
fellow-pupils, younger pupils, teachers, family
and friends 3. write in a variety of forms,
e.g. stories, poems, scripts, leaflets, posters,
advertisements, reports, diaries, notes,
electronic texts, portrayals, instructions,
questionnaires, reviews 4. write in response to
variety of audio, visual and audio-visual
stimuli, e.g. stories, poems, their interests,
activities and experiences in the classroom and
elsewhere, a television programme, a statue.
Range
24
28
Religious Education Foundation Phase
  • Range
  • Throughout the Foundation Phase children should
    have opportunities to
  • explore a wide range of stimuli
  • engage with resources from a variety of
    contexts including interactive forms
  • investigate indoor and outdoor learning
    environments including natural conditions as
    they arise
  • participate in different types of play and a
    range of planned activities, including those
    that are child-initiated and those that are
    built on previous experiences
  • work on their own and in small and large
    groups
  • Range for nursery settings
  • The range is further illustrated in Annex 2.
  • Children should (through stories, activities and
    experiences) be given opportunities to
  • gain insight into their own and other peoples
    spiritual, moral and cultural identities,
    lifestyle and traditions
  • consider the influence of the spiritual,
    moral and cultural aspects of life that have
    guided peoples lives, past and present, locally
    in Wales.
  • ask questions about their own and other
    peoples beliefs, actions and viewpoints
  • explore and express meaning in creative ways
    (through art, dance, ritual, artefacts)
  • share their personal responses to important
    personal, spiritual and moral questions
  • show responsibility, care and/or concern for
    living things for the natural world.
  • Range for the rest of Foundation Phase 
  • The range is further illustrated in Annex 2. 
  • Children should (through stories, activities and
    experience) be given opportunities to
  • gain insight into religion, religious people
    and religious aspects of life
  • explore how religion, has influenced and
    guided peoples lives, past and present,
    including the emphasis of religion on
    spirituality and religious experience, in Wales
    and the wider world
  • pose questions about beliefs, values and
    actions that arise form exploration
  • investigate and express meaning (including
    religious meaning) through signs, symbols
    artefact and imagery
  • express personal responses to personal,
    religious and moral questions
  • explore our responsibility and the
    responsibility of religion for living things and
    for the natural world
  • ask and explore more complex questions
    (including personal, religious, spiritual, and
    moral questions) about the world, human
    experience, and aspects of religion.
  • Annex 2 Religious education in the Foundation
    Phase
  • Suggested topics for People beliefs and questions
  • People, beliefs and questions for nursery
    settings
  • Within nursery settings children will concentrate
    on accessing cultural and traditional stories and
    practical experiences relating to spiritual and
    moral endeavour. These stories and experiences
    will encourage children to become aware of and
    ask questions about
  • Themselves
  • their homes, families and experiences in order
    to explore their identity (including Curriculum
    Cymreig, Cultural diversity)
  • their likes, dislikes and feelings (including
    hopes, dreams, opinions and sense of fun)
  • their role and place in the community (as a
    member of their family, out of school
    activities)
  • choices that they make (sharing, kindness,
    behaviour)
  • deeper spiritual/ moral meaning expresses in
    stories, poems, artefact, art, movement, rituals
    and celebration (birthdays, St. Davids Day,
    traditional stories about people who help
    others, dealing with happy and sad times)

Range
25
29
Religious Education Foundation Phase
  • Other people
  • other peoples homes, families and experiences
    in order to explore similarities and differences
    of lifestyle and traditions (family celebrations
    and traditions)
  • special people and people who help them
    (stories about influential people past and
    present such as Jesus and St. David, childrens
    families, teachers , and people in the
    community)
  • likes, dislikes and feelings (including
    sharing hopes, dreams, opinions and a sense of
    fun with others)
  • peoples roles and place in the community (as
    members of families and groups)
  • decisions other people make (rules, routines,
    consequences of choice, as part of a community)
  • reasons why other people express a deeper
    spiritual/ moral empathy towards other people
    (exploring why people help others in their work
    and free time)
  • the need to respect/ challenge their own
    ideas/ beliefs and those of other people (ask
    questions, share ideas and opinions)
  • Living things
  • the ways in which they and others show care,
    concern and respect for living things, the
    environment and the natural world (taking
    responsibility for animals/ plants, asking
    questions and sharing opinions)
  • responsibility/ recycling/ global concern for
    the world (finding out how people can make a
    difference)
  • awe/ wonder (investigation of nature, the
    natural world and the seasons).
  • People, beliefs and questions for the rest of the
    Foundation
  • Through developing their skills of enquiry,
    investigation and experimentation across all the
    Areas of Learning of the Foundation Phase,
    children should have opportunities to prepare for
    Key Stage 2 by extending their knowledge and
    understanding of
  • Themselves
  • their homes, families and experiences in order
    to explore their identity and belonging
    (personal experiences of festivals celebrations
    rite of passage including Curriculum Cymreig,
    cultural diversity)
  • their personal responses (in times of joy and
    sadness, their hopes, dreams, opinions and sense
    of fun)
  • their role and place in the community (as a
    member of their family, group activities
    including religious activities and charity work)
  • the decisions that they make and resulting
    consequences (behaviour, choice, attitudes)
  • deeper spiritual/ moral meaning expressed in
    the stories, poems, artefacts, art, movement,
    rituals and celebrations (religious stories,
    dealing with happy and sad times, asking about
    big questions)
  • Other people
  • other peoples homes, families and experiences
    in order to explore similarities and difference
    of lifestyle and traditions (experience of
    religious festival, worship, rules, food)
  • special people and people who help them
    (stories about Jesus and other influential
    religious people past and present)
  • personal responses (including sharing
    feelings, ideas, experiences, opinions and a
    sense of fun with others)
  • peoples roles and place in the community (as
    members of families, religious groups, local
    religious leaders)
  • decisions other people make and resulting
    consequences rules, routines, choices, being
    part of a community)
  • reasons why other people express a deeper
    spiritual/ moral empathy towards other people
    (exploring why people help others in their work
    and free time do their beliefs influence their
    lives?)
  • the need to respect/challenge their own ideas/
    beliefs and those of other people (ask
    questions, share ideas and opinions)
  • Living things
  • they ways in which they and others show care,
    concern and respect for living things, the
    environment and the natural world (taking
    responsibility for animals/plants, asking
    questions and sharing opinions)
  • responsibility/ recycling/ global concern for
    the world (finding out how people can make a
    difference)
  • awe/ wonder (investigation of nature, the
    natural world and the seasons).
  • During this phase of education children should
    also extend their skills so they can begin to
  • develop insights into religion and religious
    people
  • understand about belief and action
  • recognise and appreciate how religion has
    influenced and guided peoples lives past and
    present, including an emphasis on spirituality
    and religious experience
  • raise increasingly complex religious and moral
    questions and issues about human experience, the
    world and aspects of religion

Range
26
30
Religious Education Key Stage 2
  • Range
  • Pupils should be given opportunities to develop
    their skills by focussing on the following
    contexts for study. Theses should not be
    regarded as discrete topics but rather as
    interwoven areas of study that provide
    opportunities for pupils to engage, explore, and
    express ideas and responses. During the course
    of a whole key stage it would be reasonable to
    expect every aspect of the range to have been
    embraced.
  • Pupils should be given opportunities to develop
    skills through engaging with
  • The world
  • the origin and purpose of life how
    interpretations of the origins of the world and
    life influence peoples views, e.g. meaning and
    values
  • the natural world and living things how
    religions show concern and responsibility, e.g.
    stewardship sustainability
  • Human experience
  • human identity the ways in which religions
    understand human existence, e.g. the image of
    God uniqueness, spirituality
  • meaning and purpose of life how religious
    ideas, values and beliefs influence peoples
    responses to life and death
  • belonging how local believers , through
    home/ community celebrations, share a sense of
    identity and commitment
  • authority and influence how different forms
    of authority such as sacred texts, religious
    leaders and codes guide and influence peoples
    lives
  • relationships and responsibility how the
    importance of pers
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