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PLEASE READ FIRST

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PLEASE READ FIRST Users of BC s literacy library agree to the following conditions: Photos in this library may not be stored or used except as part of a ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Date added: 11 November 2019
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Title: PLEASE READ FIRST


1
PLEASE READ FIRST
  • Users of BCs literacy slide library agree to the
    following conditions
  • Photos in this slide library may not be stored or
    used except as part of a slide presentation,
    created from this slide library, on literacy
    issues in British Columbia. Photos in this slide
    library may not be altered or shared.
  • If you do not agree to these terms, delete this
    document now.

2
  • BCs literacy slide library
  • user notes

3
Using BCs literacy slide library
  • Creating a slideshow
  • Save a copy of this document under the name for
    your presentation (File gt Save As)
  • Browse, and delete unneeded slides (e.g., this
    one) (Edit gt Delete Slide)
  • Edit remaining slides as desired, saving
    regularly
  • Slides can easily be reordered by grabbing and
    dragging in the slide thumbnail view at left
  • Font selection
  • We have used fonts that are likely to be found on
    any computer used to display slides (otherwise,
    unpredictable fonts will be substituted in).
  • We recommend you use the same fonts if
    adding/editing. If you want to choose different
    ones, stick to the most common unless you are
    sure the display machine can accommodate you.
  • Striking a balance
  • The screen need not do all the work a slide
    presentation balances the visuals with what the
    presenter delivers orally.
  • So there is no need to clutter or cram. Instead,
    include only the core messages/information, and
    then use the slides as launchpad and reinforcer
    for your detailed discussion.
  • On some slides, the Notes section includes
    selected material which you may wish to refer to
    or replace/supplement with your own notes.

4
Using BCs literacy slide library
  • Running slides automatically
  • Sometimes you may want your slideshow to run
    itself, rather than controlling transitions
    manually. For example, it may be part of a
    display.
  • Slide Show gt Slide Transition
  • In sidebar, under Advance Slide, check
    Automatically instead of On Mouse Click
  • Specify length of time to display each slide
  • Click on Apply to All Slides
  • Sometimes you may want your slideshow to go back
    to the beginning after running to the end.
    PowerPoint refers to this as setting up a
    presentation to run in a continuous loop.
  • Slide Show gt Set Up Show
  • Under Show Options, check box for Loop
    continually until Esc
  • Check back regularly
  • We will often refresh the slide library with new
    slides. You will be able to tell by the date in
    the document name when there is a newer version.
  • Contact us if there is additional content you
    would like to see covered in the library. Visit
    Literacy Central for contact details.

www.literacycentral.bc.ca
5
  • Title slides
  • templates
  • Interstitial slides like this help users find
    slides quickly by glancing at the thumbnails on
    left.

6
Template slide Slide title here
Template provided to assist you in creating new
slides.
  • Bullet points
  • You could also highlight key info with this blue
  • The fewer the better!
  • www.literacycentral.bc.ca offers tips on creating
    presentations look for Communications Supports

Use for giving sources or other footnote info,
or delete this object if not required
Use for bumper sticker, thematic heading or
similar
7
Title of presentation
  • Name, title, affiliation of presenter
  • Date, venue of presentation

Subtitle
8
  • General background on literacy

9
What is literacy?
  • The ability to understand and use printed
    information in daily activities, at home, at work
    and in the community
  • Not about whether one can read, but how well one
    reads
  • Foundational skill upon which other skills depend
  • Literacy means communication for participation

Literacy is the essential skill
10
Measuring literacy
  • Many domains (prose, document, numeracy,
    problem-solving)
  • Level 1 difficulty reading, generally aware of a
    challenge
  • Level 2 limited skills, can deal well only with
    clearest material may not be aware of
    limitations
  • Level 3 can read well, may have difficulty with
    more complex tasks validated as needed to fully
    participate and succeed in todays society and
    economy
  • Levels 4 5 strong skills, many strategies for
    dealing with complex information

International Adult Literacy Skills Survey, 2003
11
  • BC adult literacy statistics

12
Literacy in BC
  • 35 of working-age British Columbians do not have
    the literacy skills required to fully participate
    and succeed

? BC population aged 16-65
literacy proficiency ?
Statistics Canada (2003) International Adult
Literacy and Skills Survey
Literacy is the essential skill
13
Literacy in BC
  • 35 of working-age British Columbians do not have
    the literacy skills required to fully participate
    and succeed

? BC population aged 16-65
literacy proficiency ?
Statistics Canada (2003) International Adult
Literacy and Skills Survey
Literacy is the essential skill
14
Literacy in BC
About 40 of British Columbian adults do not have
the literacy skills required to fully participate
and succeed
? BC population aged 16 and over
literacy proficiency ?
Statistics Canada (2003) International Adult
Literacy and Skills Survey
Literacy is the essential skill
15
Literacy in BC
About 40 of British Columbian adults do not have
the literacy skills required to fully participate
and succeed
? BC population aged 16 and over
literacy proficiency ?
Statistics Canada (2003) International Adult
Literacy and Skills Survey
Literacy is the essential skill
16
BCs literacy challenge
  • About 40 of adults (35 of working age
    people) do not have the literacy skills todays
    world demands
  • This means that over 1,000,000 working-age
    British Columbians have difficulty with such
    tasks as
  • Reading safety information or recipes
  • Identifying the correct amount of medicine to
    administer
  • Writing a résumé

The literacy shortfall has a profound impact on
the socio-economic fabric of our province
17
  • Some groups with lower literacy

18
Literacy the ESL dimension
Canada is a multi-lingual, multi-cultural country.
  • 20 of the population was born in another
    country.
  • 70 of these newcomers speak an original language
    other than English or French

Many bring strong literacy skills in at least one
other language, while others face literacy
challenges in their original language.
  • Most face literacy challenges in English/French
    60 below Level 3
  • Make up 2/3 of BCs working-age population at
    lowest level of literacy

Statistics Canada (2003) International Adult
Literacy and Skills Survey
Literacy means inclusion
19
Why is this important?
Literacy is grounded in ones culture, language
and history and forms a strong foundation from
which a person learns, thinks, and makes choices
for a meaningful life. Literacy level (official
language) is a key indicator of income. Without
English language skills, many immigrants are not
able to fully participate in their new home and
struggle to reach their goals.
Statistics Canada (2003) International Adult
Literacy and Skills Survey
Literacy means inclusion
20
Literacy and seniors
  • 70 of British Columbians aged 65 and over do not
    have the literacy skills demanded by todays
    world
  • Double the proportion for those aged 16-64
  • Literacy skills decline with age must exercise
    to maintain!
  • Significant implications for healthy, independent
    living

Statistics Canada (2003) International Adult
Literacy and Skills Survey
Literacy means inclusion
21
Literacy and Aboriginal people
  • Aboriginal people have lower literacy levels than
    other Canadians
  • 60 below Level 3 (national average 40)
  • First Nations estimate 70 below Level 3
  • Many Aboriginal people are reclaiming a strong
    sense of their identity and the skills and
    knowledge to succeed within their communities and
    Canadian society
  • Recent generations of First Nations people have
    experienced sub-standard educational experiences
    in residential schools
  • Many Aboriginal people wish to be significantly
    involved in making educational decisions for
    themselves and their families

Statistics Canada (2003) International Adult
Literacy and Skills Survey
Literacy means inclusion
22
  • Benefits of higher literacy

23
Some benefits of higher literacy
  • Higher employment
  • Higher income
  • Higher productivity
  • Better health
  • Engaged citizens
  • Resilient communities

Literacy means opportunity
24
Some costs of low literacy
  • Higher unemployment
  • Lower income
  • Poorer health
  • Lower productivity

Literacy means opportunity
25
Literacy increases employment
47 of those with the weakest literacy skills are
employed 81 of those with the strongest literacy
skills are employed
? employed BC population aged 16-65 2003
literacy proficiency ?
Statistics Canada (2003) International Adult
Literacy and Skills Survey
Benefits of higher literacy
26
Literacy increases employment
47 of those with the lowest literacy skills are
employed 81 of those with the strongest literacy
skills are employed
? employed BC population aged 16-65 2003
literacy proficiency ?
Statistics Canada (2003) International Adult
Literacy and Skills Survey
Benefits of higher literacy
27
Literacy raises income
Only a small proportion of those in the lowest
income brackets have strong literacy skills Only
a small proportion of those in the highest income
brackets have weak literacy skills
? of BC males aged 16-65 earning lt20,000 p.a.
? of BC males aged 16-65 earning gt60,000 p.a.
literacy proficiency ?
literacy ? proficiency
Statistics Canada (2003) International Adult
Literacy and Skills Survey
Benefits of higher literacy
28
Literacy raises income
Average income of people with strong literacy
skills double that of people with poor literacy
skills
? Average annual personal income, thousands of
dollars
literacy proficiency ?
Statistics Canada (2003) International Adult
Literacy and Skills Survey
Benefits of higher literacy
29
Literacy raises income
Average income of people with strong literacy
skills double that of people with poor literacy
skills
? Average annual personal income, thousands of
dollars
literacy proficiency ?
Statistics Canada (2003) International Adult
Literacy and Skills Survey
Benefits of higher literacy
30
Literacy boosts productivity
  • Literacy skills are the indispensable foundation
    of a robust and competitive economy
  • Estimated boost to national productivity of an
    increase of just 1 in literacy scores 2.5
  • Worth 32 billion p.a. to Canadian GDP

TD Bank Financial Group (2008) Literacy Matters
- a call for action
Benefits of higher literacy
31
Literacy enables further skill development
Few of those with the weakest literacy skills
participate in the training and education that
can open new opportunities
? receiving adult education training BC
population aged 16-65
77
23
49
60
Levels 4 5
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
literacy proficiency ?
Literacy means inclusion and opportunity
Statistics Canada (2003) International Adult
Literacy and Skills Survey
32
Literacy and civic engagement
As literacy skills increase, so does
participation in civic life and engagement with
the community
? engaged in community life, BC population aged
16 and over
Strong
Poor
Weak
Adequate
literacy proficiency ?
Statistics Canada (2003) International Adult
Literacy and Skills Survey
Literacy means participation
33
Literacy and civic engagement
As literacy skills increase, so does
participation in civic life and engagement with
the community
? engaged in community life, BC population aged
16 and over
Levels 4 5
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
literacy proficiency ?
Statistics Canada (2003) International Adult
Literacy and Skills Survey
Literacy means participation
34
Literacy matters for health
When people have stronger literacy skills they
are significantly healthier
  • Average literacy scores of those aged 16-65
    reporting poor health correspond to Level 2
    proficiency
  • Average literacy scores of those aged 16-65
    reporting excellent health correspond to Level 3
    proficiency

Statistics Canada (2003) International Adult
Literacy and Skills Survey
Literacy means quality of life
35
Literacy protects
  • Low literacy highly prevalent among inmates
  • 70 score below Grade 8 literacy level
  • Directly raises likelihood of offending
  • Significant barrier to re-integration
  • Participation in basic education in correctional
    facilities associated with a 29 decrease in
    recidivism

Steurer, S. et al (2001) The Three-State
Recidivism Study.
Literacy means inclusion
36
  • Family
  • literacy

37
What is family literacy about?
  • Promote reading and learning as valued family
    activities
  • Enhance ability of parents to support childrens
    literacy development, from birth throughout the
    school years
  • Provide opportunity for parents to pursue own
    educational goals
  • Support school-readiness of children

Families learning together
38
The power of family literacy
  • A way to reach adults who may not be engaged by
    other learning opportunities
  • Fits the reality of families lives and addresses
    barriers like childcare
  • Parents far more likely to persist with family
    literacy than with other types of learning
    programs
  • Children do better in education when parents
    involved

Families learning together
39
Four components of family literacy
Families learning together
40
  • Literacy
  • and the
  • workplace

41
What are essential skills?
  • Help people perform tasks required by their
    occupation
  • Provide foundation for learning other skills
  • Enhance ability to innovate, adapt to workplace
    change

? Reading text ? Writing ? Numeracy ?
Document use ? ? Thinking skills ? Computer
use ? Continuous learning ? ? Oral
communication ? Working with others ?
Literacy for and at work
42
Tangible benefits
  • Higher productivity
  • Reduction of workplace accidents
  • Waste prevention
  • Increased customer retention
  • Reduced turnover and absenteeism
  • Organizational flexibility

Literacy for and at work
43
Literacy improves health and safety
  • Low literacy is a major factor in at-work
    accidents
  • Difficulty understanding safety/operating
    instructions
  • Difficulty understanding first aid procedures
  • Pictorial instructions often insufficient
    (misinterpretation)
  • Even if aware of risks, may be unable to
    articulate

Literacy for and at work
44
Vulnerable sectors
  • Trade, finance, insurance and real estate
  • Manufacturing
  • Accommodation and food services
  • Construction
  • Public health care and social assistance

Literacy means productivity
45
  • Provincial
  • Literacy
  • Supports

46
Provincial Literacy Resource Centre
  • Borrow materials by mail, free, anywhere in BC
  • Books, research resources, audio-visuals, DVDs
    and more
  • Adult and family literacy
  • Specialist research and material compilation
    on-demand
  • Contact library_at_literacy.bc.ca

Provincial literacy supports
47
BC Literacy Directory
  • The easy way to find programs to help people of
    all ages improve their reading, writing and
    English language skills
  • Provincial database covers every BC community
  • Any authorized local website can draw down and
    embed custom records from central database
  • www.literacybc.ca/directory

Provincial literacy supports
48
Exemplary Literacy Materials Online
  • Find adult and family literacy resources and
    materials
  • Read and write reviews
  • For practitioners, teachers, librarians, and
    learners
  • www.elmoreviews.ca

Provincial literacy supports
49
Paul Gallagher Community Access Fund
  • Up to 1000 for community-based adult learning
    programs
  • To support learners with short-term needs (e.g.
    transport)
  • Removing barriers, promoting access
  • www.literacybc.ca/supportinglearners/financialaid.
    php

Provincial literacy supports
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