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Developing Community Research Partnerships: Entr

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Developing Community Research Partnerships: Entr e Skills Considerations and strategies for community research partnerships Ellen Goldstein, MA – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Developing Community Research Partnerships: Entr


1
Developing Community Research Partnerships
Entrée Skills
Considerations and strategies for community
research partnerships
  • Ellen Goldstein, MA
  • Roberto A. Vargas, MPH
  • Community Engagement Program
  • UCSF Clinical Translational Science Institute
    (CTSI)

2
Overview
  • Who are Community Partners
  • Rules of Engagement
  • Entrée Tasks

3
Types of Community Partners
  • Clinics
  • CBOs/ NGOs
  • Community leaders/ advocates
  • Patients
  • Community institutions (i.e. school district)
  • Departments of Public Health
  • Integrated Health Delivery Systems (i.e. Kaiser,
    V.A.)
  • Policymakers

4
Indentifying Partners
  • They are good at what they do
  • They know the issues
  • They want to partner with you

5
RAVEG Rules of Community Engagement
  • Approach partnership with humility
  • Show your commitment
  • Structure mutual benefit
  • Negotiate role clarity

6
  • 1. What are cultural competence and cultural
    humility?

7
Cultural Competence
  • A culturally competent system of care
    acknowledges and incorporates--at all levels--the
    importance of culture, the assessment of
    cross-cultural relations, vigilance towards the
    dynamics that result from cultural differences,
    the expansion of cultural knowledge and the
    adaptation of services to meet culturally unique
    needs.

8
Humility Defined
  • humility
  • noun
  • Lack of vanity or self-importance humbleness,
    lowliness, meekness, modesty.

9
Tervalon on Cultural Humility
10
Why Be Humble?
  • How might a researcher benefit by having cultural
    humility?
  • More accurate understanding of the situation or
    problem
  • Asking the right questions, making the right
    interpretations. Collecting the right data.
  • -- OR NOT--

11
2. Ensuring Mutual Benefit
  • Communities, especially underserved communities,
    are often
  • subjects of research that doesnt benefit them.

I have given you my blood, my semen, my saliva
and my urine. I have spent hours with you
answering intimate question about my sex life, my
drug use, my health and my partners and
friends. In return, I ask that you simply tell me
what you learned. -Hank Wilson, Activist, San
Francisco 1947-2008
12
Mutual Benefit
  • Dissemination of findings
  • Review their protocols, grant proposal, data set
  • Conduct training
  • Bring resources (funding, personnel, students,
    literature)
  • Participate in advocacy
  • Make sure it works for YOU!

13
3. Role Clarity
  • Who are we separately?
  • Who are we together?
  • How will we agree to proceed?

14
Support for Role Clarity
  • Principles of Partnership
  • MOU
  • Subcontract
  • Facilitation
  • Many conversations revisited often

15
4. Its all about Trust
  • Build a real relationship
  • before starting the project
  • Recognize mutual interdependence

16
Cultural Gap Between University and
Community Elmer Freeman, CCHERS (on web)
  • University disrespect of community
  • Theoretical perspective
  • Education mission
  • Intellectual rhetoric
  • Analytical frame
  • Stagnant culture
  • Community distrust of university
  • Practical orientation
  • Service mission
  • Concrete action
  • Political arena
  • Dynamic environment

17
Cross-Cultural Communication
  • Disciplines not avoiding collaboration because
    theyre evil, but partially because these are
    different cultures
  • Expect differences, work with them
  • Expect culture shock
  • Recognize distrust, power imbalance
  • Different languages, timeline, training, info
    needs/ resources, how information is disseminated

18
Cultural humility actions
  • Do your homework
  • Active listening
  • Bring an offering
  • Be willing to share

19
Trust-building actions
  • Clarify roles
  • Spend regular face time
  • Establish relationships with all relevant people
  • Budget fairly
  • Redress power imbalance

20
Bring your whole self
  • humor, compassion, bad hair days, talent,
    concerns, motivations, personal story, homemade
    cookies

21
Take Home Points
  • Approach potential community partners with
    questions, curiosity and humility
  • Trust-building is essential to success
  • Structures support clear roles
  • Benefit is mutual

22
Linkage facilitators
  • CTSI Community Engagement Program
  • http//ctsi.ucsf.edu/about/programs/ce
  • 206-4048
  • Office of University Community Partnership
  • partnerships_at_ucsf.edu
  • 476-5696

23
Homework
  • Reflect What are your assumptions about the
    community in which you are working?
  • What are their challenges and strengths? What
    has been your experience with them?
  • Develop an entrée plan. Who will you contact?
    How? Whats your opening?
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