Culture(s) and Learning - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Culture(s) and Learning PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 6a85b2-NGYwN



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Culture(s) and Learning

Description:

Culture(s) and Learning Issues of power, cultural identity, and educational culture(s), and the impacts of these on learners and their learning; cross-cultural ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:57
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Date added: 24 October 2019
Slides: 39
Provided by: lmu
Learn more at: http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Culture(s) and Learning


1
Culture(s) and Learning
  • Issues of power, cultural identity, and
    educational culture(s), and the impacts of these
    on learners and their learning cross-cultural
    capability developing the learning environment.
  • Relates most specifically to learning outcome
    associated with ..the context in which
    professional practice takes place in relation to
    learners, learning environments, and support

2
Who External stakeholders
  • Government
  • Government agencies (QAA, TTA, etc)
  • Parents/ sponsors
  • Employers
  • Prospective students (markets)
  • Professional bodies
  • Academic leaders discipline gurus
  • Publishers

3
Who Internal stakeholders
  • VC, Deans, HOS,
  • Committees/ Regulators (Registry, Secretarys
    Office)
  • Academic staff
  • Administrative staff
  • Learning Support staff
  • Financial controllers
  • Students
  • Technologists
  • External Examiners

4
Cultural Symbols and Power
5
The Importance of Symbols
  • The study of organisational cultures suggests
    these symbolic representations and symbolic
    actions some deliberate, some accrued not
    only represent an organisational culture, but in
    doing so, also verify or create with us
    expectations with regard to their values, to how
    we should act in response (if we wish to
    successfully engage), and to how we will be
    judged by those within the organisation.

6
Cultural Symbols and Power
7
Power
  • A faculty member will play many roles in the
    classroom teacher, facilitator, learner, mentor,
    evaluator, to name a few. But there is one thing
    that is common to all these roles power.
  • Introduction to a staff development workshop,
    Centre for Teaching Excellence (http//www.cte.tcu
    .edu/ )

8
Power
  • A faculty member has power in the classroom. How
    can this power be used to encourage student
    learning? How does it impact students from
    different ethnic or cultural backgrounds? How
    does this power influence male students
    differently from female students?
  • Introduction to a staff development workshop,
    Centre for Teaching Excellence (http//www.cte.tcu
    .edu/ )

9
Styles/Modes
  • In hierarchical mode, the teacher takes full
    responsibility for all aspects of the learning
    process, such as setting learning objectivesIn
    co-operative mode, power over the learning
    process is shared by the teacher and the
    learnersIn autonomous mode, the teacher provides
    an environment conducive to learning, but
    students take responsibility for self-directed
    learning
  • Summary of J.Heron on the wed site of Centre for
    the Advancement of Teaching Learning at the
    University of Western Australia
    (http//www.catl.uwa.edu/au/NEWSLETTER/issue0600/r
    esponsibility.htm)

10
Where do you sit (mostly)
?
  • In hierarchical mode
  • In co-operative
  • In autonomous mode
  • And where do your learners want you or need you?

11
Culture Identity
  • Cultures Subcultures Idiocultures
  • Products producers of our culture(s)

12
Culture Identity
  • Diversity brings variety in identities
  • Tutor student roles
  • Peer relationships
  • Attitudes to personal and institutional authority
    veneration or challenge
  • Hierarchies family/ state/ religion/ self

13
Values Diversity
  • Value systems are an integral part of any
    cultural context and where several cultural
    contexts meet, as they do in pluralistic and
    multi-ethnic societies, questions inevitably
    arise relating to the existence of universal
    values and culture-specific (relativistic)
    values
  • Thomas E Researching Values in Cross-cultural
    Contexts in - Gardener R, Cairns J, Lawton D,
    (Eds) Education for Values 2000, London Kogan
    Page (BP LC 370.114 EDU) p260

14
Values Diversity
  • and how a balance can be achieved between both
    when it comes to developing a values curriculum
    that must have a common appeal.
  • Thomas E Researching Values in Cross-cultural
    Contexts in - Gardener R, Cairns J, Lawton D,
    (Eds) Education for Values 2000, London Kogan
    Page (BP LC 370.114 EDU) p260

15
Learning Cultural Context
  • A social epistemology enables us to consider the
    word learning not as standing alone, but as
    embodying a range of historically constructed
    values, priorities, and dispositions towards how
    one should see and act towards the world.
  • Popkewitz T.S. Brennan M. Restructuring of
    Social Political Theory in Education Foucault
    and a Social Epistemology of School Practices P9
    in Popkewitz T.S. Brennan M. (eds) 1998
    Foucaults Challenge Discourse, Knowledge, and
    Power in Education Teachers College Press,
    Colombia University

16
Educational culture
  • Outcome driven
  • Critical/ Reflexive thinking
  • Autonomous learning

17
Educational Values
  • Democratic
  • Egalitarian
  • Secular

18
Curriculum as Cultural Practice
  • Curriculum always entails a selection from
    culture, a privileging of certain values over
    others
  • Schaafsma D. Performing the Self Constructing
    Written and Curricular Fictions p261 in Popkewitz
    T.S. Brennan M. (eds) 1998 Foucaults
    Challenge Discourse, Knowledge, and Power in
    Education Teachers College Press, Colombia
    University (pp 55-277)

19
Truth (and power and culture)
  • Truth is a thing of this world it is produced
    only by virtue a multiple form of constraint. And
    it induces regular effects of power. Each society
    has its regime of truth, its general politics
    of truth
  • Foucault M. 1980 Power?Knowledge Selected
    interviews and other writings by Michael
    Foucault, 1972-1977 (C.Gordon, Ed. And
    Translator) New York Pantheon p131

20
Truth (and power and culture)
  • that is, the type of discourse which it accepts
    and makes function as true the mechanisms and
    instances which enable one to distinguish true
    and false statements, the means by which each is
    sanctioned the techniques and procedures
    accorded value in the acquisition of truth the
    status of those who are charged with saying what
    counts as true.

21
Impacts of Cultures on Learning
  • Learning styles
  • Schema
  • Stereotype Threat
  • Culture Shock

22
Activist
Pragmatist
Reflector
Theorist
23
Learning Styles Culture 1
  • .As learning style preferences are recognised by
    many to exist within a group, differences are
    also found across cultures..In general thinking
    about differences in learning style suggests that
    culture significantly influences the manner in
    which one learns how to learn. Cushner K. 1994
    (p121)

24
(No Transcript)
25
Whos Learning Style is Preferred?
  • some learning activities are dominated by
    explicit or implicit assumptions about learning
    styles. The activity may be so geared to a
    particular style of learning as to cause a
    mismatch with any participant whose own major
    preferences are different..Generally courses
    are based on the learning styles of course
    runners not learners. Honey P. Mumford A. 1992
    (P21)

26
Learning Styles Culture 1
  • .As learning style preferences are recognised by
    many to exist within a group, differences are
    also found across cultures..In general thinking
    about differences in learning style suggests that
    culture significantly influences the manner in
    which one learns how to learn. Cushner K. 1994
    (p121)

27
Culture Learning Styles 2
  • For many students, especially those from
    non-European 'convergent' cultures, the teaching
    and learning traditions in regard to academic
    writing, research and assessment are very
    different from those of the 'divergent' western
    model. Their past training and experience will
    have given them a very different idea of what it
    takes to be a 'good' student for instance they
    may be accustomed to being rewarded for
    'following the master' rather than 'questioning
    the question'. Ryan J. 2000

28
Readings
  • Book of Rites
  • Rig Veda Mantra
  • Curriculum in Islamic Centres of Learning

29
(No Transcript)
30
Prototype Theory
31
Prototype Theory
32
Schema
33
Schema
  • Learning theories commonly state that students
    construct meaning by relating new information to
    previous knowledge and personal experience, by
    'hooking' into the student's existing schemata.
    Unless international students are able to use
    their background knowledge and learn how to apply
    it to new situations, they will have difficulty
    building new knowledge. Ryan J. 2000 (p56)

34
Types of Schema
  • Content-based schemata derive from prior
    experience of the content knowledge that is
    relevant to the original text, whereas
    text-based schemata result from previous
    experience of similar text types or genres. Both
    these types of schemata or background knowledge
    affect the reader's comprehension of a text.
  • Winskel H.

35
  • ..I have not yet learned to see an Indian village
    or a bazaar my eyes arent trained, and I
    couldnt describe one to save my life. I love
    them and am endlessly fascinated but all I can
    make out is a wild surrealist confusion of men
    and animals and many kinds of inanimate objects,
    arranged in completely implausible patterns.
  • Edmund Taylor, Richer by Asia

36
Cultural Differences
37
A HEFCE View
  • What emerges clearly from the case studies is
    how adjusting methods of learning, teaching and
    assessment to meet the needs of a very wide range
    of students including mature students and
    disabled students in practice benefits all
    students.
  • HEFCE 2002 Successful student diversity Case
    studies of practice in learning and teaching and
    widening participation (Nov 2002/48)
    http//www.hefce.ac.uk/pubs/hefce/2002/02_48.htm

38
Power lt gt Education lt gt Cultures
About PowerShow.com