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Influential Americans

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Title: Influential Americans


1
  • Influential Americans Math
  • Notes on this PowerPoint Jeopardy game
  • Each question page leads to an answer page.
    Each answer page leads back to the main choice
    board.
  • There is bonus type question in italics on
    almost every answer page to engage the thinkers
    even more. Use the on the keyboard to
    see the previous slide, if needed.
  • The answers to the bonus question will be shown
    in the notes section of on each page. To have a
    printed copy, select print and choose to print
    Notes Pages.
  • Each page is laid out such that clicking
    anywhere on the page will advance the slide
    except for the bottom ½ inch or so, which will
    always be a citation link to the Library of
    Congress pages where the images can be found.

2
Influential Americans
Math
3
Post-War U.S. History
Reconstruction to WWII
Colonial
Revolutionary
Antebellum
100
100
100
100
100
200
200
200
200
200
300
300
300
300
300
400
400
400
400
400
500
500
500
500
500
4
Post-War U.S. History
Reconstruction to WWII
Colonial
Revolutionary
Antebellum
100
100
100
100
100
200
200
200
200
200
300
300
300
300
300
400
400
400
400
400
500
500
500
500
500
5
Colonial 100
During Colonial times the English tried to
convince the natives to join their side by
promising them protection against the neighboring
tribes. Place the appropriate greater than/less
than symbol between the two tribes to show how
they compare in number.
Bry, T. (1591). Outina defeats Pontanou with the
aid of the French. Library of Congress Prints
Photographs
6
Colonial 100
lt If we could see more of the picture, what
could make another symbol the right one to use?
Bry, T. (1591). Outina defeats Pontanou with the
aid of the French. Library of Congress Prints
Photographs
7
Colonial 200
This image shows a meeting between
Metacomet (King Phillip) and colonists from the
Massachusetts Bay Colony. Which group had more
people at the meeting the colonists or the
Wampanoug?
Wood, S. N. (c.1911). King (Metacomet) Philip,
Sachem of the Wampanoags, d. 1676, full length,
standing at treaty table with white men. Library
of Congress Prints Photographs
8
Colonial 200
Answer colonists What was the ratio
of Wampanoug to colonists?
Wood, S. N. (c.1911). King (Metacomet) Philip,
Sachem of the Wampanoags, d. 1676, full length,
standing at treaty table with white men. Library
of Congress Prints Photographs
9
Colonial 300
As the colonies grew, the colonists began taking
over more and more native land. Indian Chiefs
such as Massasoit began organizing
attacks on the colonists for
disobeying the treaties they
had set. During this time
there were 15,000 natives and more
than 35,000 colonists living in America. How
many more colonists were there than natives?
Chegeree. (ca. 1755). Map of the country about
the Mississippi. Library of Congress Exhibitions,
 American Treasures of the Library of Congress
10
Colonial 300
Answer approximately 20,000 Approximately
how many times more colonists than natives were
there?
Chegeree. (ca. 1755). Map of the country about
the Mississippi. Library of Congress Exhibitions,
 American Treasures of the Library of Congress
11
Colonial 400
John Smith claims that Pocahontas saved him from
captivity in 1607. However, he did not publish a
book about this event until 1616. A) How
many years are between the event and the
publication of the book? B) This
painting was made in 1870. How many years
are there between when the event
happened and when the painting was made?
New England Chromo. Lith. Co. (c1870). Pocahontas
saving the life of Capt. John Smith / New England
Chromo. Lith. Co. (bw film copy neg). Library of
Congress Prints Photographs, Popular Graphic
Arts
12
Colonial 400
Answers A) 9 years. B) 263 years.
Is this picture a primary or secondary
source?
New England Chromo. Lith. Co. (c1870). Pocahontas
saving the life of Capt. John Smith / New England
Chromo. Lith. Co. (bw film copy neg). Library of
Congress Prints Photographs, Popular Graphic
Arts
13
Colonial 500
During the 1700s, South Carolinas
economy was heavily based on growing
rice. Slaves from the rice-growing
regions of Africa, known as the Rice
Coast and the Windward Coast, were
therefore especially attractive to the
planters, who were willing to pay
higher prices for slaves with experience
with the crop. This was a deadly
assignment for slaves, however,
since up to a third of them died within
a year of their arrival. If 250 Africans
arrived in Charleston, South Carolina, in 1780,
how many of them would still be alive one year
later?
Unknown. (1940-1960). To be sold, on board the
ship Bance Island, ... negroes, just arrived from
the Windward Rice Coast. Library of
Congress American Memory, African American
Odyssey
14
Colonial 500
Answer 166 Based on
this document, how many of the surviving
people would you expect to have had
small-pox already?
Unknown. (1940-1960). To be sold, on board the
ship Bance Island, ... negroes, just arrived from
the Windward Rice Coast. Library of
Congress American Memory, African American
Odyssey
15
Revolutionary 100
This image depicts Pontiac meeting with
British colonists. Given what you
already know about the relationship
among Native Americans and British
colonists, what chance do you think
there is for peace? Is it certain,
unlikely, or impossible? What percent would you
give to the chance?
Melchers, G. (1921). Conspiracy of
Pontiac. Library of Congress Prints
Photographs, Detroit Publishing Company Collection
16
Revolutionary 100
Answer The chances for peace are
probably unlikelywhy? What would a percent be
if the
chance was very likely?
What if there was no chance?
Melchers, G. (1921). Conspiracy of
Pontiac. Library of Congress Prints
Photographs, Detroit Publishing Company Collection
17
Revolutionary 200
There are 15 total lines in this poem
by Phyllis Wheatley. If there are 3 stanzas
in the poem, how many lines are there
per stanza?
Unknown. (n.d.). Poems on various subjects,
religious and moral. (Image 19). Library of
Congress American Memory, African American
Odyssey
18
Revolutionary 200
Answer 5 lines per stanza What is
the name for this type of stanza?
Unknown. (n.d.). Poems on various subjects,
religious and moral. (Image 19). Library of
Congress American Memory, African American
Odyssey
19
Revolutionary 300
When Benjamin Bannecker and others first drew
the plans for Washington, D.C., the city was
intended to be built on exactly 100 square miles
of land donated by other states. In 1846,
Congress voted to give back to the state of
Virginia all the land they had donated. Now,
Washington, D.C. is 68 square miles. How much
land did Congress give back to Virginia?
King, R. (1818). A map of the city of Washington
in the District of Columbia established as the
permanent seat of the government of the United
States of America. City map with depiction of
"East front of the Capitol of the United States"
/ by Rt. King, surveyor of the City of
Washington. Library of Congress Prints
Photographs
20
Revolutionary 300
Answer 32 square miles of land. If this
land was rectangular, what could be its
dimensions?
King, R. (1818). A map of the city of Washington
in the District of Columbia established as the
permanent seat of the government of the United
States of America. City map with depiction of
"East front of the Capitol of the United States"
/ by Rt. King, surveyor of the City of
Washington. Library of Congress Prints
Photographs
21
Revolutionary 400
On Thursday, December 16, 1773, the Sons of
Liberty left a massive protest meeting and
headed toward Griffins Wharf where three
English ships carrying tea were docked. The men
quickly unloaded the cargo and dumped the tea
overboard. By dawn, 45 tons had been
dumped into the harbor. An eyewitness account
published in the Boston Gazette a few days later
reported that the entire event took less than
four hours. If this is true, how many tons of
tea were dumped each hour?
Berger, D. (1784). Die einwohner von Boston
wersen den englisch-ostindischen thee ins meer am
18, December 1773 / D. Chodowiecki inv. et del.
D. Berger sculpsit 1784. Library of
Congress Prints Photographs, Popular Graphic
Arts
22
Revolutionary 400
Answer a little more than 11.25 tons
per hour If there are 2,000 pounds in a
ton, how many pounds of tea were wasted?
How much do you weigh?
Berger, D. (1784). Die einwohner von Boston
wersen den englisch-ostindischen thee ins meer am
18, December 1773 / D. Chodowiecki inv. et del.
D. Berger sculpsit 1784. Library of
Congress Prints Photographs, Popular Graphic
Arts
23
Revolutionary 500
Thomas Paine was
born in 1737. He was known for
pamphlets
that helped bring
attention to the

Revolution. What year would this flyer
have been made?
Unknown. (n.d.). Programme. Paine's ode to
America. Air-"Rule Britannia.". Library of
Congress American Memory, America Singing
Nineteenth-Century Song Sheets
24
Revolutionary 500
Answer Thomas Paine would have been 133
years old in 1870 . How old would Paine be
today? Which other peoples birthdays
do we
celebrate still? Will we
celebrate yours?
Unknown. (n.d.). Programme. Paine's ode to
America. Air-"Rule Britannia.". Library of
Congress American Memory, America Singing
Nineteenth-Century Song Sheets
25
Antebellum 100
Many of the periodicals published before the
Civil War that were devoted to the abolition of
slavery were short-lived. Frederick Douglass
North Star, founded in Rochester, New York, in
1847 was an exception. The North Star remained
in publication until 1861. How many years did
it last?
Douglass, F. (1849). The North Star. Library of
Congress Exhibitions, American Treasures of the
Library of Congress
26
Antebellum 100
The North Star remained in publication for 14
years The North Star's slogan, "Right is of no
Sex--Truth is of no Color--God is the Father of
us all, and we are all Brethren," testifies to
the broad scope of the newspaper's coverage,
including not only emancipation but also women's
suffrage and education.
Douglass, F. (1849). The North Star. Library of
Congress Exhibitions, American Treasures of the
Library of Congress
27
Antebellum 200
David Walker was a
pamphleteer who used his position as a
free black to spread the word that
revolution was possible. He would sew
pamphlets like this into the clothing
of sailors who would deliver them to
slaves in the south. If
one copy of his pamphlet was read by 25
people and he sewed 10 copies into the
sailors clothes, how many total people
could he expect to read his pamphlet?
American Anti-Slavery Society Anti-Slavery
Office (New York). (1837). Am I not a man and a
brother?. Library of Congress Prints
Photographs, Cartoon Prints, American
28
Antebellum 200
David Walker could
expect 250 people to read his
pamphlet. The pamphlet says to costs 2
cents per single copy or 1.00
per hundred. It also says there were
2,250,000 slaves in the U.S. How much
would it cost to buy enough
pamphlets so that all slaves got to read
one?
American Anti-Slavery Society Anti-Slavery
Office (New York). (1837). Am I not a man and a
brother?. Library of Congress Prints
Photographs, Cartoon Prints, American
29
Antebellum 300
This image shows slaves
sorting through cotton
on a S.C. plantation in 1862. Around this time,
cotton was the biggest cash crop in the South.
1.8 million of the 2.5 million slaves in the
U.S. worked with cotton. How many slaves were
involved in growing other cash crops like
tobacco and indigo?
O'Sullivan, T. H. (1862). Port Royal Island,
S.C. African Americans preparing cotton for the
gin on Smith's plantation. Library of
Congress Prints Photographs, Selected Civil
War Photographs
30
Antebellum 300
Approximately 0.7 million slaves

were working with other
crops. How do you write out 0.7
million? What percent was that of the
total slaves?
O'Sullivan, T. H. (1862). Port Royal Island,
S.C. African Americans preparing cotton for the
gin on Smith's plantation. Library of
Congress Prints Photographs, Selected Civil
War Photographs
31
Antebellum 400
In her work Summer on the Lakes, Margaret
Fuller discusses the role of women in Westward
Migration. She identifies specific hardships
that women faced on the trip West and speaks
from her experience visiting the Wisconsin
Territory. Women were in charge of cooking for
their family. If they ate 3 meals a day and
each meal took 4 hours to prepare, what
percentage of their day was spent cooking?
Unknown. (1840-1880). Margaret Fuller. Library of
Congress Prints Photographs
32
Antebellum 400
The women spent 50 of their day
cooking. What percentage of the day do you
think women today spend cooking?
Unknown. (1840-1880). Margaret Fuller. Library of
Congress Prints Photographs
33
Antebellum 500
During the battle of Thames, the British joined
Tecumseh and the Indian Confederation in battle
against the United States. As a result of
the Battle, 15 U.S. soldiers were killed. The
British and Indian Confederation lost 3 times
that number. If the British and Indian
Confederation started with 1300 men, how many men
survived the battle?
Drake, B. (1856). Life of Tecumseh, and of his
brother the Prophet with a historical sketch of
the Shawanoe Indians. Library of
Congress American Memory, The First American
West The Ohio River Valley, 1750-1820
34
Antebellum 500
This drawing depicts the death of the famous
Shawnee leader Tecumseh at the Battle of Thames
during the War of 1812.
Answer 1255
Drake, B. (1856). Life of Tecumseh, and of his
brother the Prophet with a historical sketch of
the Shawanoe Indians. Library of
Congress American Memory, The First American
West The Ohio River Valley, 1750-1820
35
Reconstruction to WWII 100
In the 1800s most Chinese Americans settled in
California. San Francisco was the first city to
host a large Chinese population. Most Chinese
lived near each other in the citys
Chinatown. How many streets in Chinatown
are perpendicular to Dupont St.?
San Francisco Board of Supervisors, Special
Committee on Chinatown. (c1885). no.1 From
Miscellaneous Selections San Francisco's
Chinatown - Architectural Space Official map of
"Chinatown" in San Francisco. Library of
Congress American Memory, The Chinese in
California, 1850-1925
36
Reconstruction to WWII 100
Answer 4 What type of angles are formed by
the intersecting streets on this map? Are any
streets parallel to Dupont
St?
San Francisco Board of Supervisors, Special
Committee on Chinatown. (c1885). no.1 From
Miscellaneous Selections San Francisco's
Chinatown - Architectural Space Official map of
"Chinatown" in San Francisco. Library of
Congress American Memory, The Chinese in
California, 1850-1925
37
Reconstruction to WWII 200
In the 1800s advertising started to
become a way of life. Madame C.J. Walker
(also known as Sarah Breedlove) took
advantage of this to sell her hair
products. Sarah Breedlove became one of
the wealthiest African-Americans in the
country. If she earned 50.00 by selling
100 bottles of hair tonic, how much did
each one cost?
Unknown. (1920). Madam C.J. Walker--Preparations. 
Library of Congress American Memory, American
Women A Gateway to Library of Congress Resources
38
Reconstruction to WWII 200
Each one would cost 50
cents. How much would she have earned
if she sold 100 bottles of each type of
toilet preparation shown in the
advertisement?
Unknown. (1920). Madam C.J. Walker--Preparations. 
Library of Congress American Memory, American
Women A Gateway to Library of Congress Resources
39
Reconstruction to WWII 300
In 1920 after many decades of hard work by
suffragettes like Alice Paul, the 19th Amendment
to the constitution was passed giving women the
right to vote. In the 1916 Presidential Election
there were 18,536,585 Americans who cast a
ballot. In 1920, there were 26,765,180.
How many more Americans voted in 1920 than
in 1916?
Burke Atwell. (1916). Suffragists Protest
Woodrow Wilson's Opposition to Woman Suffrage,
October 1916. Library of Congress American
Memory, Women of Protest Photographs from the
Records of the National Woman's Party
40
Reconstruction to WWII 300
8,228,595 more Americans voted in
1920. According to the U.S. Census
statistics, In the 2000 U.S. elections
59,284,000 women and 51,542,000 men
voted.
Burke Atwell. (1916). Suffragists Protest
Woodrow Wilson's Opposition to Woman Suffrage,
October 1916. Library of Congress American
Memory, Women of Protest Photographs from the
Records of the National Woman's Party
41
Reconstruction to WWII 400
John Muir, known as the Father of our
National Parks, was born in Scotland in 1838,
and moved to the United States with his family
when he was 9 years old. He loved to travel, and
even walked from Indianapolis, Indiana, to the
Gulf of Mexico. One of his favorite places was
California. From the Sierra Nevada Mountains,
he wrote, he could see the Central Valley
of California, level and flowery, like a lake of
pure sunshine, forty or fifty miles wide, five
hundred miles long . Today, the Central Valley
is home to many of the nations farms. What is
the perimeter of this region?
Muir, J. (1894). The mountains of California, by
John Muir. Library of Congress American
Memory, "California as I Saw It" First-Person
Narratives of California's Early Years, 1849-1900
42
Reconstruction to WWII 400
The perimeter of the region
could be between 1,080 and
1,100 miles long. What could
the area be?
Muir, J. (1894). The mountains of California, by
John Muir. Library of Congress American
Memory, "California as I Saw It" First-Person
Narratives of California's Early Years, 1849-1900
43
Reconstruction to WWII 500
William Johnson was a famous artist during the
Harlem Renaissance. He lived in France, New
York, and Denmark and his artwork was influenced
by all of the cities he lived in. Based on the
paintings below, what are the odds that all of
William Johnsons paintings used bright colors?
Can you give a ratio?
Follow this link and type in Johnson, William H
to view all these images on the Library of
Congress Web site
44
Reconstruction to WWII 500
The odds are good that a painting by William
Johnson made use of vibrant colors. Answer 5
out of 6 paintings were colorful. (5/6 or
56) Based on these images, what would the
odds be as a ratio?
Follow this link and type in Johnson, William H
to view all these images on the Library of
Congress Web site
45
Post-War U.S. History 100
Dr. Luis Alvarez was a famous scientist during
the 20th century. Although he was a physicist
and helped make the atomic bomb during World War
Two, he was interested in other areas of
science, too. He worked with his son Walter, a
geologist, to prove that asteroids collided with
the Earth more than 60 million years ago and
that this caused a change in the climate that
killed the dinosaurs. We have been able to
learn about the dinosaurs from their bones, which
have been found buried throughout the world.
Scientists recreate skeletons, like this one on
exhibit at the Field Museum in Chicago, to help
us better understand these huge creatures.
Estimate (guess) how many bones make up this
skeleton.
Unknown. (n.d.). Dinosaur exhibit at the Field
Museum, with the tail of the dinosaur at the
right of the image. Library of
Congress American Memory, Photographs from the
Chicago Daily News, 1902-1933
46
Post-War U.S. History 100
If this dinosaur was a T-Rex, a
complete skeleton would have around 200
bones. If the man in the picture
was 6 feet tall, estimate how tall
the skeleton is.
Unknown. (n.d.). Dinosaur exhibit at the Field
Museum, with the tail of the dinosaur at the
right of the image. Library of
Congress American Memory, Photographs from the
Chicago Daily News, 1902-1933
Chicago Daily News, Inc., photographer.
(1908). Professor Elmer S. Riggs standing next
to dinosaur bones at the Field Museum. Library
of Congress American Memory, Photographs from
the Chicago Daily News, 1902-1933
47
Post-War U.S. History 200
Roberto Clemente played right
field for the Pittsburgh Pirates from 1955
to 1972. Clementes batting average and
his fielding were so good that he was
elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame, the
first Hispanic American to achieve
that honor. During his long and
successful career, he had 9454 at bats and
3000 hits. What fraction
represents the relationship between his
hits and his at-bats? (Estimate!)
http//www.umich.edu/ac213/student_projects/spr/b
aseball.html
48
Post-War U.S. History 200
His ratio of hits to at bats is
about 1/3. This number is his batting
average. Clemente had a
batting average of 0.317, meaning
he got a hit 31.7 of the time.
Barry Bonds average today is about 0.299.
http//www.baseball-reference.com/b/bondsba
01.shtml
http//www.umich.edu/ac213/student_projects/spr/b
aseball.html
49
Post-War U.S. History 300
Rachel Carson was an
environmentalist, someone
who wants to protect and preserve nature.
Her activism in the 1950s and 1960s paved
the way for later environmental
groups. One issue that has led to
a lot of conflict is the logging
of old-growth redwood trees.
Environmentalists want to preserve them for
future generations to enjoy, but lumber companies
love them because they are very strong and big.
A typical redwood grows to be 367 feet tall.
How many 6 foot men would need to stand
head-to-toe to be as tall as one of these trees?
Tillson, K. (1985). Falling an old-growth
redwood, 1985. Library of Congress America's
Library, Explore the States
50
Post-War U.S. History 300
Over 61 six-foot tall people standing
head-to-toe would be needed to be as tall as
a Redwood, whose scientific name is
Sequoia. Compare the height of the man
in the photo to the pine tree next to him.
If it takes 61 men to equal the height of
the Sequoia tree, how many pine trees
would it take to equal the Sequoia?
Cooper, W. S. (n.d.). Sequoia sempervirens, Eel
River Valley, California. Library of
Congress American Memory, American Environmental
Photographs, 1891-1936 Images from the
University of Chicago Library
51
Post-War U.S. History 400
Migrant farm workers are people who move from
place to place to pick crops as they are
harvested. Cesar Chavez helped start the
United Farm Workers union to fight for migrant
farm workers rights. His organization won
rights and protections for workers such as
getting paid a decent wage and working in safe
conditions. On a tomato farm in Florida, the
average person works 10 hour days, picks 100
buckets of tomatoes and earns about 50 in one
day. How long would it take to pick one bucket
of tomatoes and how much would the bucket be
worth?
Hemming, R. (1941). "Group of Children Posing
Under Sign That Reads "U.S. Department of
Agriculture Farm Security Administration Farm
Workers Community." . Library of
Congress America's Library, Meet Amazing
Americans
52
Post-War U.S. History 400
It would take 6 minutes to pick one bucket.
The bucket would be worth 0.50 What would
be the workers wage per hour? Today, there
are about 13 million migrant farm workers in the
U.S.
Hemming, R. (1941). "Group of Children Posing
Under Sign That Reads "U.S. Department of
Agriculture Farm Security Administration Farm
Workers Community." . Library of
Congress America's Library, Meet Amazing
Americans
53
Post-War U.S. History 500
In 1917, Fannie Lou Hamer, the youngest
of 20 children, was born to a sharecropping
family in Mississippi. Although she went
on to become a passionate civil rights
leader, she dropped out of school after
sixth grade to work in the fields. This was
not unusual. In the 1930s, only 5 of
black students in Mississippi went to high
school. There were about 1 million African
Americans living in Mississippi in 1930,
and about half of them (500,000) were
below the age of 18. How many of these
children would have gone to high school?
Leffler, W. (1964). Fannie Lou Hamer at the
Democratic National Convention, Atlantic City,
New Jersey, August 1964. Library of
Congress Prints Photographs
54
Post-War U.S. History 500
250,000 of African American children
would have attended high school. If 5
of children went to high school and Fannie
was one of 20 children, how many of the
children in her family would have gone to
high school?
Leffler, W. (1964). Fannie Lou Hamer at the
Democratic National Convention, Atlantic City,
New Jersey, August 1964. Library of
Congress Prints Photographs
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