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How To Prevent a Meltdown

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How To Prevent a Meltdown Or at least make it not so bad – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: How To Prevent a Meltdown


1
How To Prevent a Meltdown
  • Or at least make it not so bad

2
Autism Spectrum Disorders
  • Autism is a neurological or developmental
    disability that impairs a persons sensory
    processing, verbal and nonverbal communication,
    social interaction, problem solving, and
    development.
  • The term spectrum is used because no two people
    have exactly the same symptoms.
  • Symptoms range from mild to severe.

3
Classic Characteristics of ASD
  • Social skills deficits
  • Communication deficits
  • Engagement in repetitive activities
  • Resistance to change
  • Unusual responses to sensory experiences

4
Emotional Disabilities
  • Emotional and/or behavioral problems are
    behaviors exhibited that are deemed
    inappropriate and adversely affect the students
    educational performance over a long period of
    time and to a marked degree.
  • The student may have an inability to learn that
    cannot be explained by intellectual, sensory, or
    health factors
  • The student may have an inability to build or
    maintain interpersonal relationships
  • The student may display inappropriate types of
    behavior under normal circumstances
  • The student may have a general pervasive mood of
    unhappiness or depression

5
EMD may look like this
  • Refusal to follow directions
  • Use of inappropriate language
  • Failure to interact with peers and teachers
  • Unprovoked aggressive behaviors
  • Skewed sense of reality

6
What would you do if this was your student?
7
This wont work!
8
Or this
9
Not this either!
10
How Does It Feel to Have Autism? Emotional
Disability?
Volunteers?
Recite the D_cla_at_ation of Inpendenc3.

How many stone aged are complet a ton? Who
maanddees electricity? What is the Theory of
ddheelvfs jdenc?
11
Share
  • How did you feel emotionally?
  • What did you see?
  • Hear?
  • Feel tactilely?

12
Stages of a Meltdown
  • Anxiety/Starting Out a noticeable change in
    behavior
  • Can be an increase or a decrease
  • Examples

13
Stages of a Meltdown
  • Defensive/Picking Up Steam beginning stage of
    loss of rationality
  • Student may become belligerent
  • Student may challenge authority
  • Examples

14
Stages of a Meltdown
  • Acting-Out/Point of No Return total loss of
    control which results in physical or emotional
    acting out episode
  • Its on!!!!!
  • Flight or fight mechanism is triggered
  • Examples

15
Stages of a Meltdown
  • Tension Reduction/Recovery Period a decrease in
    physical and emotional energy that occurs after
    one has acted out
  • This is your goal
  • Can happen after any stage
  • Examples

16
Your Response
  • Supportive be non-judgemental and empathic to
    attempt to alleviate anxiety
  • Listen
  • Show concern
  • Ask questions
  • Acknowledge the students feelings
  • Understand that students with ASD and EMD
    sometimes do not have automatic sensory
    regulation

17
Your Response
  • Directive an approach to take control of a
    potentially escalating situation
  • Set limits
  • Re-direct
  • Offer choices positive, positive positive,
    negative or negative, positive

18
Your Response
  • CPI techniques all staff members working with
    students prone to meltdowns should be CPI
    certified , especially if the meltdowns tend to
    become physical
  • Remove the audience
  • Allow the student to vent and just listen
  • Silence is ok
  • Do not attempt to touch the student unless he is
    a threat to himself or others

19
Your Response
  • Once the student has reached tension reduction,
    re-establish communication
  • Reassure the student that your relationship is
    not damaged
  • Allow down time

20
Keys to Verbal Intervention and Setting Limits
  • Simple and clear
  • Reasonable
  • Enforceable
  • Stay calm
  • Be aware of body language
  • Give undivided attention

21
Why the Meltdown?
  • Precipitating Factors internal or external
    causes of acting out behavior over which staff
    have little to no control
  • examples poverty, rejection, bullying
  • Sensory Processing Problems the inability to
    filter external sensations or organize sensory
    messages
  • Sensitivity to light, noise, touch, taste, or
    smell
  • Perfumes, crowded areas, scratchy clothing,
    bright lighting

22
Why the Meltdown?
  • Difficulty with Abstract Thinking inability to
    imagine what is not directly perceived by the
    senses
  • If I cant see it, hear it, or touch it, it must
    not be true!
  • Difficulty with Perspective Taking the
    inability to feel empathy (to feel what others
    feel)
  • Inflexibility inability to accept change or
    alter what is expected

23
Video clip
24
What Can You Do?
  • Offer sensory breaks
  • Teach social skills
  • Give specific directions and questions
  • Break tasks into smaller steps
  • Use visual images to teach abstract thoughts
  • Use visual schedules
  • Use timers for transitions
  • Warnings about schedule changes
  • Use video modeling
  • Help peers understand their behavior and ask them
    to be supportive and accepting

25
What can you do?
  • Use rewards, punishment is not as successful with
    EMD students
  • Be consistent
  • Be structured
  • Positive reinforcement
  • Structure the classroom setting to offer a quiet
    place to work
  • Avoid demanding eye contact
  • Implement the use of a safe person for needed
    breaks
  • Avoid a power struggle

26
Your Turn
  • Suggestions, ideas, thoughts???

27
Steven Speilberg
Jean-Claude Van Damme
Jane Pauley
Robert Downey, Jr
Dan Akroyd
Ludwig van Beethoven
28
Courtney Love
Mark Twain
Andy Warhol
Daryl Hannah
Satoshi Tajiri, Pokemon
Albert Einstein
29
Dr.Temple Grandin, Doctor of Animal Science,
Professor at Colorado State University, author,
inventor, advocate and
Autistic
30
My 1 in 88!
  • Zachary Tyler Corley

31
  • The information we shared today can be employed
    with any student that is headed for meltdown
    mode. Students dont act out in a vacuum and we
    need to be able to think on our feet so that we
    act in accordance with what has been proven
    successful and best for the child.

32
  • Bibliography
  • Baker, J. (2008). No More Meltdowns. Arlington,
    TX, USA Future horizons.
  • CPI. Nonviolent Crisis Intervention. Milwaukee,
    WI, USA.
  • Harlan, J. C., Rowland, S. T. (2002). Behavior
    Management Strategies for Teachers (Vol. 2nd
    edition). Springfield, IL, USA Charles C Thomas.

33
Other Resources
  • www.Interventioncentral.org 
  • Behavior Intervention Manual 
  • How to Talk So Kids Can Learn by Adele Faber and
    Elaine Mazlish 
  • The Social Skills Picture Book by Jed Baker,
    Ph.D. 
  • The Out-of-Sync Child by Carol Kranowitz, M.A. 
  • A Treasure Chest of Behavioral Strategies by Beth
    Fouse, Ph.D and Maria Wheeler, M.Ed.
  •  
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