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Alphabet Of Lines

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Alphabet Of Lines Introduction to the Alphabet of Lines In order to understand what the drafter or designer is trying to get across, you must be able to understand ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Date added: 28 April 2019
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Title: Alphabet Of Lines


1
Alphabet Of Lines

2
Introduction to the Alphabet of Lines
  • In order to understand what the drafter or
    designer is trying to get across, you must be
    able to understand the symbols and lines he uses.
  • Each line has a definite form and line weight.
  • The standard thick line weight varies from .030
    to .038 of an inch.
  • The standard thin line weight varies from .015 to
    .022 of an inch.

3
11 Main Line Types
  • Object
  • Hidden
  • Center
  • Dimension
  • Extension
  • Leader
  • Section
  • Cutting Plane
  • Phantom
  • Viewing Plane
  • Break

4
Object Lines
  • Dark, heavy lines.
  • Show the outline and shape of an object.
  • Define features you can see in a particular view.

5
Hidden Lines
  • Light, narrow, short, dashed lines.
  • Shows the outline of a feature that can not be
    seen in a particular view.
  • Used to help clarify a feature, but can be
    omitted if they clutter a drawing.

6
Section Lines
  • Thin line usually drawn at a 45 degree angle.
  • Indicates the material that has been cut through
    in a sectional view.

7
Center Lines
  • Thin line consisting of long and short dashes.
  • Shows the center of holes, slots, paths of
    rotation, and symmetrical objects.

8
Dimension Lines
  • Dark, heavy lines.
  • Show the length, width, and height of the
    features of an object.
  • Terminated with arrowheads at the end.

9
Extension Lines
  • Used to show the starting and stopping points of
    a dimension.
  • Must have at least a 1/16th space between the
    object and the extension line.

10
Leader Lines
  • Thin lines.
  • Used to show the dimension of a feature or a note
    that is too large to be placed beside the feature
    itself.

11
Cutting Plane Lines
  • Thick broken line that is terminated with short
    90 degree arrowheads.
  • Shows where a part is mentally cut in half to
    better see the interior detail.

12
Break Lines
  • Used to break out sections for clarity or for
    shortening a part.
  • Three types of break lines with different line
    weights.
  • Short Breaks.
  • Long Breaks.
  • Cylindrical Breaks.

13
Short Break Lines
  • Thick wavy line.
  • Used to break the edge or surface of a part for
    clarity of a hidden surface.

14
Long Break Lines
  • Long, thin lines.
  • Used to show that the middle section of an object
    has been removed so it can be drawn on a smaller
    piece of paper.

15
Cylindrical Break Lines
  • Thin lines.
  • Used to show round parts that are broken in half
    to better clarify the print or to reduce the
    length of the object.

16
Phantom Lines
  • Thin lines made up of long dashes alternating
    with pairs of short dashes.
  • Three purposes in drawings.
  • 1. To show the alternate position of
  • moving parts.
  • 2. To show the relationship of parts
  • that fit together.
  • 3. To show repeated detail.

17
Alternate Position
  • Phantom lines can show where a part is moving to
    and from.
  • Eliminates the confusion of thinking there may be
    2 parts instead of just 1.

18
Relationship of Mating Parts
  • Phantom lines can also show how two or more parts
    go together without having to draw and dimension
    both parts.

19
Repeated Detail
  • Phantom lines can show repeated detail of an
    object.
  • Saves the drafter time and the company money.
  • Less chance of drafter error.

20
Summary
  • Now that we have discussed the 11 main line
    types, you should be able to do the following
  • 1. Identify the alphabet of lines.
  • 2. Identify where the line types are
    used.
  • 3. Produce the lines with various
  • line weights.
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